Translate

Thursday, 31 May 2018

What will happen with the Australian monitor HMAS Cerberus in the near future? Help to save her!


In Australia the hull of the monitor HMAS Cerberus still exists, sadly enough her future is threatened. There is a website of the Friends of the Cerberus with the clear intention of saving her. I asked John Toogood to supply more information what he did. See the text below. In the 19th Century was also the Royal Netherlands Navy interested in this ship. A Dutch naval officer received an order from the minister of navy to supply more details. He even made a sketch drawing of her. Why?, should someone ask. In that period was suggested in Dutch newspapers that Australia seemed to want her own colonial empire and the Dutch East Indies were nearby. Nonsense may be, but we have now a fine sketch of her. At the same time was the Roral Netherlands Navy interested in naval shipbuilding abroad especially for the pratical use of innovations. Let's hope that except for the sketch she herself also keeps existing as one of the few remaining 19th Century warships!

Cerberus in 2006. The entire ship and guns in the sea towards the bottom of the photo are visible. Photo with kind permission of Lindsay Stepanow. Source

The following have been used variously with Fb shares linking back to our primary FACEBOOK. which is a shared link to our main website’s 9 April ’18 news item.

Is this the 'last gasp' for Cerberus? Let's hope not!
Bayside Council recently lodged a formal application with Heritage Victoria to fill our former HMVS/HMAS Cerberus with concrete under the guise of Heritage preservation despite clearly being at odds with the "Burra Charter" which is accepted nationally as the standard for heritage conservation.

Monitor at Risk Down-under!
Cerberus is not an 'American' Civil War survivor but a British built forerunner of the next generation Monitors. Launched in 1868, the same decade as USS Monitor and H.L. Hunley, she now rests relatively intact (albeit tenuously) right where she was 'parked' in 1926 ... about 200 metres off-shore at a bay-side Melbourne (Australia) beach. Time is fast running out for supporters to make a submission opposing Bayside Council's application to fill the monitor, former HMVS/HMAS Cerberus with concrete. These must be in writing (hard-copy) mailed to Heritage Victoria as indicated by the original news item to arrive no later than 24 April '18. If you live outside Australia and wish to make a submission feel free to do so by email to “Friends of the Cerberus Inc.” making sure you allow a few days for us to print and forward by conventional mail on your behalf.
Hard-copy submissions are essential and required by Heritage Victoria no later than their stated deadline in order to be considered regarding the defeat of Bayside Council's permit application but emails may still be sent as well. They certainly won't do any harm, just make sure the snail-mail is sent to arrive in time.

All are urged to share this post on your timelines, any relevant Fb pages you manage and groups to which you belong. Every share, like and (favourable) comment helps to spread our message and encourage others to 'join the fray'. 

John Toogood FACEBOOKPOST share dated 11 April 2018:
This is a disgraceful prospect coming as it does during centenary celebrations and threatening the sole substantive remains of Australia's Great War Fleet (albeit in an auxiliary role), our only pre-federation war ship and the last of Victoria's colonial 'battle' fleet. If our responsible politicians and bureaucrats think that irreversibly filling Cerberus with concrete is a real preservation option and not simply what it appears to everyone else, a crass attempt to 'make it go away' whilst releasing heritage funds to mitigate local government risk, then clearly they have no right to claim heritage credentials and I for one will be carefully reviewing my life-long voting habits in the future.
Even if it is accepted that 'fill-and-forget' is currently the only short/medium term prospect there are far superior alternatives to concrete available that are affordable, reversible, environmentally neutral and won't increase the weight of Cerberus' footprint (4,000 tonnes of concrete is estimated to result in a net weight increase to the ship's sea-bed footprint of about 137% after allowing for water displacement).

This Fb post published by The heritage Network and shared widely during Feb-Mar of 2015 isn’t directly related to the current issue of stopping Bayside Council from filling the ship with concrete but nevertheless does provide some background.

The Heritage network Published by John Toogood·26 February 2015

HMAS (formerly HMVS) Cerberus:
As the Great War loomed, despite her already advanced age (launched 1868 - commissioned 1871 with the Victorian Colonial Navy) and with 43 years of service to three Australian Navies behind her, the Monitor Cerberus was 'drafted' and recommissioned as a Port Guard and Ammunition Store-Ship after being briefly decommissioned during the pre-war period. HMAS Cerberus is photographed here at her third mooring location, near the mouth of the Yarra River off Williamstown in Victoria's Hobson's Bay, circa 1914. After the war (in April 1921) she was re-named HMAS Platypus II and tasked as 'secondary tender' for the J-Class Submarine fleet based in Corio Bay.
Cerberus currently rests in 3 meters of water just 200 metres off-shore at Half Moon Bay where she was essentially run aground and scuttled to form a breakwater in 1926. The ship remains largely intact although a partial collapse of the lower hull during severe storms in 1993 has hastened its subsidence in the interim.

The 1860s Monitor, former HMVS/HMAS Cerberus is Australia's only warship from the pre-1918 era that has survived into the 21st century, albeit tenuously. As we plot a course through the Great War's (1914-18) centenary we bear witness to major projects from around the world undertaken by Countries with a commitment to restore their few surviving 1914-18 warships in time for significant anniversary celebrations. Not so however in 'the land of Oz' where successive Australian governments at all levels continue to procrastinate whilst their only such opportunity slips further away.
Image sourced from Friends of the Cerberus Inc.'s main website 
Courtesy of the "State Library of South Australia."

Bayside Council recently lodged a formal application with Heritage Victoria to fill our former HMVS/HMAS Cerberus with concrete under the guise of Heritage preservation despite clearly being at odds with the "Burra Charter" which is accepted nationally as the standard for heritage conservation. The current status of Cerberus, being included on Australia's "National Heritage List", doesn't seem to matter when bureaucratic antagonism and political indifference are allied against valid community concerns for our vanishing heritage. Our supporters can still help to convince Heritage Victoria that a positive heritage outcome remains an option only if they deny Bayside Council's application. Check out the following extract ("Submissions") from our recently published Newsletter 198. Help to 'scuttle' this destructive and unacceptable proposal. Send your individual protest as indicated, to Heritage Victoria by conventional (hard-copy) mail today and make sure you beat their 24 Apr '18 deadline. If lost for words feel free to copy and paste the form letter provided on our "HELP" page.
'Submissions.

Naturally we will be making a submission to Heritage Victoria. Anyone wishing to do likewise should be aware that submissions should be posted, and NOT emailed, to Heritage Victoria, PO Box 500, Melbourne 8002.

Any overseas supporters wishing to make submissions can email them to us via john.rogers@cerberus.com.au and we will post them to Heritage Victoria.

It cannot be emphasised enough that Heritage Victoria will decide later this month whether to fill Cerberus with concrete. All indications are that the application will be approved.
By my reckoning, 1,700 cubic metres of concrete will require over 200 concrete trucks to fill Cerberus. A horrifying thought. What a way to treat a place on the National Heritage List.'
Follow the link, read  Newsletter 198 in full and update yourself with Friends of the Cerberus' position regarding these latest developments.

Thursday, 10 May 2018

Singapore bulk carrier (ex-Doric Challenge 2006-2007, Prem Varsha 2007-2012, Sri Prem Varsha 2012-2016, Bcolas XL 2016-2017, Ikolasohl 2017) Nikolas XL 2017-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 4 April 2018

Marshall Islands-flagged, homeport Majuro, IMO 9311165, MMSI 538007280 and call sign V7FI7. As the Sri Prem Varsha Panama-flagged and owned and managed by Mercator Lines Singapore, Singapore. Ex-Doric Challenge renamed 12 January 2007 and Prem Varsha renamed May 2012. Also ex-Eleni 2010? Built by Tsuneishi Tadotsu Factory, Tadotsu, Japan in 2006. Still owned  and managed by Mercator Lines Singapore, Singapore

Wednesday, 9 May 2018

Polish general cargo ship (ex-Leysand 1993-1999) Bienville 1999-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 15-4-2018

Poland-flagged, homeport Gdansk, IMO 9073854, MMSI 261510000 and call sign SNDK. Ex-Leysand renamed March 1999. Owned and managed by Gdanska Zegluga, Gdansk, Poland. Built by Damen Shipyard Gorinchem, Gorinchem, Netherlands in 1993. 

Tuesday, 8 May 2018

Dutch oil/chemical tanker (ex-Astrid Terkol 1993-1996) Stolt Kittiwake 1996-


Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 15-4-2018

United Kingdom-flagged, homeport Cardiff, IMO 8920579, MMSI 235050032 and call sign MAIT. Owned and managed by Stolt Tankers, Rotterdam, Netherlands. Ex-Astrid Terkol renamed January 1996. Built by Euroflex Marine, Aarhus, Denmark in 1993. 

Monday, 7 May 2018

Norwegian oil/chemical tanker Liv Knutsen 2009-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 15-4-2018

United Kingdom-flagged, homeport Aberdeen, IMO 9409273, MMSI 235073404 and call sign 2CJU3. Built by Jiangnan Shipyard Group, Shanghai, China in 2009. Owned and managed by Knutsen Gas Shipping, Haugesund, Norway. 

Sunday, 6 May 2018

Greek bulk carrier (ex-KN Arcadia 2001-2005. Libre 2005-2012) Bulk Juliana 2012-




Schelde off Vlisingen, Neherlands 16 April 2018

Panama-flagged, IMO 9235854, MMSI 352486000 and call sign H9PF. Ex-KN Arcadia renamed July 2005 and Libre renamed May 2012. Built by Shin Kurushima Toyohashi Shipbuilding, Toyohashi, Japan in 2001. Owned and managed by Seamar Management, Athens, Greece. 

Saturday, 5 May 2018

Dutch inland pusher tug (ex-Elly 1989-1995, Ilda Do Corisco 1995-1998, Betsie-G 1998-2004, Britt 2004-2006, Hendrik 6 2006-2008, Diablo 2008-2011) Catharina 5 2011-


Inner harbour of Vlissingen, Netherlands 21 April 2018

ENI 0238246, EU 2318855, MMSI 244650935 and call sign PD2324. Built with yard number 8672 by Damen Shipyard, Gorinchem, Netherlands in 1989/ Tonnage 29 tons and as dimensions 16,50 x 6,54 x 2,00 metres. Machinery consists of 2-548hp Caterpillar. Ex-Elly of Graan Elevator Maatschappij BV, Rotterdam, Netherlands, since 1994 of European Bulk Service BV, Rotterdam, renamed Ilda Do Corisco and since 1995 of Wijsmuller Bulk Lease CV, Montevideo, Uruguay, renamed Betsie-G and since 1998 of G. van Doorn Beheer, Wormer, Netherlands, renamed Britt in 2004 of Silver Side Shipping SA, Luxembourg, renamed Hendrik 6 in 2006 of van Aerde Sleepdienst. Sas van Gent, Netherlands, Diablo renamed 2008 of Vof. Diablo(P. Hoefnagel), Tolebeek, Netherlands and renamed Catharina 5 in 2011 of Hebo Maritime Service BV, Zwartsluis, Netherlands.

Friday, 4 May 2018

Chinese general cargo ship Da Ji 2016-



Outer harbour Vlissingen, Netherlands 20 April 2018

China-flagged, IMO 9768538, MMSI 413490410 and call sign BOUF. Also called a heavy lift ship. Owned and operated by Cosco Shipping Specialised Carriers, subsidiary of Cosco. Built in 2016. 

Thursday, 3 May 2018

Dutch former sailing cargo ship Anna Jobke 1908

Historical Harbour, Schiedam, Netherlands 21 April 2018

A so-called Hagenaar. Nowadays an inland pleasure craft annex floating house.

Wednesday, 2 May 2018

Dutch former sailing cargo ship Linquenda

Historical Harbour, Schiedam, Netherlands 21 April 2018

Netherlands-flagged, ENI 03050371, MMSI 244710339 and call sign PF8905.
Dimensions 22,1 x 4,7 metres. Nowadays an inland pleasure craft. 

Tuesday, 1 May 2018

Dutch former sailing cargo ship Nooit Gedacht

Historical Harbour, Schiedam, Netherlands 21 April 2018

Netherlands-flagged, ENI 02206262, MMSI 244710168 and call sign PC8926.
Dimensions 20,8 x 4,6 metres. Nowadays an inland pleasure craft. 

Monday, 30 April 2018

Polish stern trawler TR-30 Cold War design


Dimensions 28,50 (waterline)-30,35 (over all) x 7,90 (moulded) x 4,10 (moulded depth) x 3,10 (moulded) metres, hold capacity 175 cubic metres, fuel bunker capacity 45 cubic metres/38 tons, fresh water bunker capacity 15 tons. Crew accommodation for 14 persons. Horsepower 850hp. Cruising range 15 days and speed 3 (bottom trawling with tower power of around 5,7 tons)-4 (pelagic trawling with towing power 5,2 tons)-11 knots. Designed for the bottom or pelagic fishing methods to a maximum depth of around 275 metres. 

Sunday, 29 April 2018

German general cargo ship Paula Anna 2012-


Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 2 April 2018

Cyprus-flagged, homeport Limassol, IMO 9507142, MMSI 212211000 and call sign 5BRM4. Earlier Antigua&Barnuda-flagged, homeport Saint John’s and MMSI 305863000. Owned and managed by Eicke Schiffahrt, Heide-Holst, Germany. Built by Bodewes Shipyard, Hoogezand, Netherlands in 2012. 

Saturday, 28 April 2018

Danish oil/chemical tanker Hafnia Soya 2015-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 7 April 2018

Singapore-flagged, IMO 9729271, MMSI 566583000 and call sign 9V3282. Built by Hyundai Mipo Dockyard, Ulsan, South Korea as the Hyundai Mipo 2573 in 2015. Owned and managed by Hafnia Tankers, Hellerup, Denmark. 

Friday, 27 April 2018

German oil/chemical tanker Georg Essberger 2004-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 7 April 2018

Madeira/Portugal-flagged, IMO 9191175, MMSI 255735000 and call sign CQSW.
Built by Baltic Shipyard, St. Petersburg, Russia in 2004. Owned and managed by Essberger, Hamburg, Germany. 

Thursday, 26 April 2018

Italian tug (ex-Wolf 2006-2007, BB Ocean 2007-2015) Multratug 14 2015-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 7 April 2018

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Terneuzen, Netherlands, IMO 9360594, MMSI 244850959 and call sign PBIJ. Gross tonnage 407 tons, net tonnage 149 tons and dimensions 31,59 (between perpendiculars)-34,50 (over all) x 11,60 (over all) x 6,50 (maximum) metres. Speed 13,9 knots. Bollard pull 75 tons. As the BB Ocean, Denmark International Register-flagged, homeport Copenhagen, MMSI 220535000 and owned and managed by Bukser&Bjerging, Oslo, Norway. Built by Astilleros Armon, Navia, Spain in 2006. Ex-Wolf of Ocean S.r.l, Trieste, Italy renamed June 2007 BB Ocean of Bjergning Danmark A/S, Copenhagen, Denmark chartered from Ocean S.r.l. and renamed Multatug 14 on 9 June 2015 chartered by Multarship B.V., Terneuzen from Ocean s.r.l. 

Wednesday, 25 April 2018

Saudi Arabian ro-ro cargo ship Bahri Jazan 2013-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 7 April 2018

Saudi Arabia-flagged, homeport Dammam, IMO 9620970, MMSI 403533001 and call sign HZFI. Owned by NSCSA. Riyadh, Saudi Arabia and managed by Mideast Shipmanagement, Dubai, United Arab Emirates. Built by Hyundai Mipo Dockyard, Ulsan, South Korea in 2013. 

Dutch 1st charter Keurvorst van Saksen 1688-1712



Of the admiralty Amsterdam, 3-decker, built by Jan van Rheenen at Amsterdam, Netherlands in 1688, stricken between 1711-1712, dimensions (Amsterdam foot) 170 (prow) x 43 x 16 and an armament of 92 guns (1711: 28-24pd guns, 28-18pd guns, 28-12pd guns and 8-6pd guns).

Dutch inland tug (ex-Krammer 1954-1968, RHD IV 1968-1985) Assistent 1985-



Maassluis, Netherlands 21 April 2018

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Rotterdam, ENI 02334721, MMSI 244650236 and call sign PI2231. Tonnage 12 tons and as dimensions 16,90 x 4,35 x 1,95 metres. Built with yard number 483 by Bodewes BV, Millingen a/d Rijn, Netherlands in 1954. Owned by Nederlandse Stoombootsleepdienst v/h Piet Smit Jr. NV, Rotterdam, Netherlands as Krammer since 1954, since 1965 of Maatschappij Holland NV, Rotterdam, as RHD IV since 1968 owned by Rijkshavendienst, Rotterdam, renamed Assistant in 1985 and owned by M. Laarman, Leidschendam, Netherlands and since 2011 by M.L.M. Laarman, Leidschendam. 

Dutch motor tug Taurus II launched at Vlaardingen, Netherlands according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 17 January 1930

An item reported the launching of the Dutch steel built motor tug Taurus II by Fa. A. de Jong, Vlaardingen, Netherlands for account of B. Suring, Arnhem, Netherlands and J.F. Garnier, Amsterdam, Netherlands. Dimensions 20 x 4,80 x 2,20 metres. Fitted out with 1-200hp Deutz diesel engine. 

Italy wanted to built a nuclear tanker according to the Dutch newspaper Gereformeerd gezinsblad dated 20 August 1958

An item reported that in Italy was examined if and under which conditions a 70.000 tons nuclear propelled tanker and a nuclear propelled cargo submarine could be built.

British intended to start on short notice with building nuclear tanker according to the Dutch newspaper Trouw dated 25 July 1957

An item reported that the shipbuilders of the Queen Mary and the Queen Elizabeth announced that on short notice at the Clyde would be started with building the first 65.000 tons measuring nuclear propelled tanker with as building costs 11,5 million pound sterling including 4 million for the hull, 6 million for the kern reactor and 1,5 million for the fuel. Shortly afterwards announced a second British shipyard also to start with building a nuclear tanker.(1)

Note
1. Not realized. 

Dutch and German designs for an European nuclear propelled ship most suitable to realized according to the Dutch newspaper De Telegraaf dated 26 July 1962

An item referred to OESO informants reporting that the in the Netherlands (1) made design for building a European nuclear propelled ship was just like the in Germany (2) with Euratom made design contender for the most suitable project. The Reactor Centrum Nederland, de shipbuilding industry and the Stichting voor Toegepast Natuurwetenschappelijk Onderzoek (T.N.O.) designed a 53.000 nuclear propelled tanker.

Notes
1. Never realized
2. The only German built nuclear propelled merchant ship was the Otto Hahn, ordered on 27 November 1962, laid down by Howaldtswerke, Kiel, Germany with yard number 1103 on 31 august 1963, launched on 13 June 1964, completed on 1 October, commissioned on 11 October 1968 and as the Liberian-flagged Madre sold to be broken up in 2009. IMO 6416770 and call sign A8GI9. 

Luxury yacht Amels 473



Inner harbour, Vlissingen, Netherlands 18 April 2018

The Danish navy budget 1910-1911 and naval multi-annual program according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1909-1910 no. 8

Olfert Fischer

An item reported that in the design Danish navy budget for 1910-1911 6 million Dutch guilders was asked of which 1 million for extra ordinary expenses. The new defence program asked for a fleet of 4-circa 3.500 ton coastal defence ships of the Olfert Fischer type, 24 torpedo boats or submarines of around 200 tons, 2-500 ton minelayers and the necessary mines and other equipment for mine barrages. As reserve for the defence of Copenhagen, Denmark were 2-1.500 ton cruisers and the present aged ships available. The Peder Skram was to be completed within 2 years together with 6 torpedo boats and 1 minelayer. In the three years to follow was the keel to be laid down for 1 coastal defence ships, 4 large torpedo boats and 2 submarines to be completed and started with the building of a large submarine, for the major part by the navy yard at Copenhagen. The winter squadron consisted now of the coastal defence ship Olfert Fischer, the torpedo boats Ormen, Nordkaperen and Makrelen and the submarine Dykkeren. 

French navy needed more money to modernize the artillery according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1909-1910 no. 8

An item referred to the supplementary French navy budget for 1909 which described the large expenses needed to modernize the artillery of the fleet to an up to date level. Needed was 221 million francs over a period of 6 years, meaning around 96 million more as was approved for the artillery in the annual budgets. 

Crude oil tanker Pacific Nafsika 2015-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 16 April 2018

Marshall islands-flagged, homeport Majuro, IMO 9732278, MMSI 538006922 and call sign V7KS4. Built by Daehan Shipbuilding, Hwawonmyun, South Korea with yard number 5008 on 16 November 2015, launched on 26 June 2016 and delivered on 16 November 2016. Owned by Silver No. 34 S.A. and operated by Fleet Management Limited. Earlier Panama-flagged. Other sources claims managed by Sinokor Merchant marine, Seoul, South Korea and sailing for Shell Trading and Shipping Company/STASCo. 

The Russian navy budget for 1910 according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1909-1910 no. 8

An item reported that the Russian navy budget for 1910 amounted 123 million Dutch guilders for the ordinary expenses and another 3 million to solve the expenses of the Russo-Japanese war of 1904-1905. For new building was 19 million available, for the commissioned fleet 22,7 million and for the necessary strengthening of the Baltic fleet 3,9 million. The personnel strength was now 41.800 men. 

Dutch fluyt ship Kievit 1799-1800

Of the department Amsterdam, hired in 1799, returned to owners in 1800, with an armament of 16 guns. Commanding officer H. Bille between 29 October 1799-19 February 1800. 

Dutch 1st charter Keurvorstin van Brandenburg 1688-1701 and Koningin van Pruisen 1701-1713

Of the admiralty Amsterdam, built by Hendrik Cardinaal at naval yard at Amsterdam, Netherlands in 1688-1689, renamed Koningin van Pruisen in 1701, broken up at the navy yard at Amsterdam in 1713, dimensions (Amsterdam foot) 170 (prow) x 43 x 16, an armament of 92 guns (1711: 28-23pd guns, 28-18pd guns, 28-12pd guns,8-6pd guns) and a crew numbering 500 men

Tuesday, 24 April 2018

British surveyor patrol vessel Verifier 1989-

Outer harbour Vlissingen, Netherlands 15 April 2018

United Kingdom-flagged, homeport London, England, IMO 8957716, MMSI 235000932 and call sign MLWN4. Built by Steelships, Truro, United Kindom in 1990. Designed as the WatercraftP2000 design to replace the British Archer-class patrol vessels. Used as test bed for missile deployment. Converted into a survey vessel by Damen Trading using Amgram design parameters in 2001. Dimensions 21,20 x 5,80 x 1,55 metres. 

Dutch transport Kogerkerk 1688

Of the admiralty Amsterdam, hired Amsterdam for ƒ 1.360 as part of the fleet which brought king-stadholder Willem III to England in 1688. Master Marten Jacobss, appraised value of ship ƒ 7.800. 

Dutch warship Klok 1571

A so-called seabeggar, owner Lumey and seized by the British crown while lying at Dover, England in November 1571. 

Dutch guard vessel Kijkuit 1781-1783

Of the admiralty Maze, gaff schuyt, a so-called uitlegger, built at Rotterdam, Netherlands in 1781 1781, sold in 1783, dimensions 64 x 21 x 9 feet, an armament of 4 guns and a crew numbering. Commanding officer in 1782 captain Walrave. 

Dutch LPG tanker Sundowner 2016-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 7 April 2018

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Rotterdam, Netherlands, IMO 9715713, MMSI 244830182 and call sign PCTK. Built by Shipyard Constructions Hoogezand, Hoogezand, Netherlands in 2016. Owned and managed by Chemgas Shipping, Rotterdam, Netherlands. 

Russian general cargo ship (Ex-Flinterborg 2003-2008, Flinterbright 2008-2012, Fast Gilles 2012, Flinterbright 2012-2013, Fast Gilles 2013, Flinterbright 2013-2017) Kapitan Kokovin 2017-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 18 April 2018

Russia-flagged, homeport Archangelsk, IMO 9279422, MMSI 273396150 and call sign UAOX. Managed and owned by Northern Shipping Company, Archangelsk, Russia. Ex-Flinterborg renamed February 2008, Flinterbright renamed January 2012, Fast Gilles renamed June 2012, Flinterbright renamed February 2013, Fast Gilles renamed July 2013 and Flinterbright renamed 2017. As the Flinterbright owned and managed by Flinter, Barendrecht, Netherlands, Netherlands-flagged, homeport Rotterdam, Netherlands, call sign PHAN and MMSI 244483000. Keel laid down by Bodewes Shipyard, Hoogezand, Netherlands on 4 November 2003. 

Soviet Union intending to built a nuclear propelled tanker according to the Dutch newspaper Het vrije volk dated 9 May 1964

Van Stoom tot Atoom, 1961. 
Text G.A.J. Bovens-drawings G.J. Frans Naerebout

An item reported that the Soviet Union intended to built a second non-combat ship.(1) It was to be a tanker with a deadweight of around 40.000 tons to be used for bunkering whalers and to be stationed for a longer period in the areas of hunting.

Note
1. The first one was the icebreaker Lenin, laid down in 1957, completed in 1959, decommissioned in 1989 and became a museum ship. IMO 5206087. Displacement 16.000 tons and as dimensions 134 x 27,6 x 16,1 (depth) x 10,5 metres or 440 x 91 x 53 x 34 feet. Fitted out with 2 OK-150 nuclear reactors , since 1970 2 OK-900 and 4 steam turbine generators resulting in a speed of 18 knots. Crew numbered 243 men. 

Japanese Kawasaki Dockyard Company Limited wanted to built nuclear propelled tanker according to the Dutch newspaper Gereformeerd gezinsblad dated 28 August 1957

An item referred to a statement of the Kawasaki Dockyard Company Limited, Kobe, Japan that she intended to built a 40.000 nuclear propelled tanker with a horsepower of about 20.000hp.(1)

Note
1. Japan built just one nuclear ship namely cargo cargo ship Mutsu, laid down by Second Tokyo Factory, Ishikawajima-Harima Hvy Ind on 17 November 1968, launched on 12 June 1970, delivered on 13 July 1970, completed and fully loaded on 4 September 1972, decommissioned 1992 and rebuilt as the still existing research vessel Mirai. IMO 6919423.

Italy wanted to built a nuclear tanker according to the Dutch newspaper De Tijd dated 1 September 1960

An item reported that the Italian Fai concern, the Ansaldo shipyards and the commission for nuclear energy asked the European organisation Euratom (European Atomic Energy Community) for technical and fiscal support during two years for building a 52.000 tons nuclear propelled tanker. Originally was the intention to use a pressurized water type but now was also a boiling water reactor an alternative. The maximum horsepower was to be 23.100hp and the ship would be able to steam non-stop about 7.500 miles.

Dutch container ship (ex-Actuaria 2007-2008, Ara Atlantis 2008-2009, Emily Borchard 2009-2014) Ara Atlantis 2014-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 15-4-2018

Gibraltar-flagged, IMO 9354375, MMSI 236471000 and call sign ZDIO6. Built by JJS Sietas Schiffswerft, Hamburg, Germany in 2007. Owned and managed by Ara Shipmanagement, Werkendam, Netherlands. Ex-Actuaria renamed May 2008, Ara Atlantis renamed May 2009 and Emily Borchard renamed 26 January 2014. 

Dutch lighter Louise 1953-

Part of the fleet of the Afdeling Scheepvaart. Commissioned on 1 September 1953 . Stationed at Sorong, Netherlands New Guinea. Steel built. Tonnage 50 tons.

Source
Dutch Parliament session 1954-1955. Budget Netherlands New Guinea 1953-1954. Memory of response. Attachment No. 14. 

Dutch lighter Lise 1952-

Part of the fleet of the Afdeling Scheepvaart. Commissioned on 30 September 1952 . Stationed at Manokwari, Netherlands New Guinea. Steel built. Tonnage 50 tons.

Source
Dutch Parliament session 1954-1955. Budget Netherlands New Guinea 1953-1954. Memory of response. Attachment No. 14. 

Dutch pilot launch Tulp 1954-

Part of the fleet of the Afdeling Scheepvaart. Horsepower 20 hp. Expected end of 1954. Stationed at Steenkool, Netherlands New Guinea.

Source
Dutch Parliament session 1954-1955. Budget Netherlands New Guinea 1953-1954. Memory of response. Attachment No. 14. 

Dubai owned LPG tanker Eships Shamal 2010-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 15-4-2018

Gibraltar-flagged, IMO 9506198, MMSI 236567000 and call sign ZDJT9. Built by STX Shipbuilding Busan, Pusan, South Korea in 2010. Owned by Eships, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates and managed by Anglo eastern Shipmanagement Singapore, Singapore. 

British wanted to built giant nuclear propelled tankers according to the Dutch newspaper Gereformeerd gezinsblad dated 22 February 1957

Van Stoom tot Atoom, 1961. Text G.A.J. Bovens-drawings G.J. Frans Naerebout

An item reported that British nuclear scientists were developing kern reactors suitable for oil tankers as large as the Queen Mary (1) specially designed to round Cape of Good Hope and to have a speed of 25-30 knots. Yet it was unknown if nuclear propulsion would be profitable. The service costs of the American submarine USS Nautilus (2) were six times that of a standard non-nuclear merchant ship. A special commission of the British Shipbuilding Research Association and the Authority for Atomic Energy were studying the practical possibilities for merchant shipping.

Notes
1. Ordered on 3 April 1929m laid down by John Brown and Company, Clydebank, Scotland with yard number 534 on 1 December 1930, launched on 26 September 1934, maiden voyage begun on 27 May 1936 and decommissioned on 9 December 1967. Displacement 81.961 tons, gross register tonnage 81.237 tons and as dimensions 294,1 (between perpendiculars)-319,7 (over all) x 36,0 x 11,9 metres or 965-1.019,4 x 118 x 39 feet.
2. Nautilus (SSN-71), building awarded on 2 August 1951, laid down by General Dynamics on 14 June 1952, launched on 21 January 1954, completed on 22 April 1955, commissioned on 30 September 1954, decommissioned and stricken on 3 March 1980. 

British not to built nuclear propelled merchant ship on short notice according to the Dutch newspaper Het Vrije Volk dated 28 July 1962

The American Savannah
Van Stoom tot Atoom, 1961. Text G.A.J. Bovens-drawings G.J. Frans Naerebout

An item referred to a statement of John Hughes-Hallett (1) on behalf of the British Ministry of Transport that for time being England would not built a nuclear propelled merchant ship despite the strong wish of the parliament.(2) At first was thought of a 20.000-30.000 tons tanker but other countries had already such a ship (the USA had the Savannah) or were developing plans. Hughes-Hallett claimed that the yet available kern reactors were not economic profitable for merchant ships and proposed to wait for the results with the American Savannah.(3)

Notes
1. Vice-admiral John Hughes-Hallett (1 December 1901-5 April 1972), after his naval career officer he became after 1954 Member of Parliament and between 1961-1964 Parliamentary Secretary to the Ministry of Transport for Shipping and Shipbuilding .
2. Never realized. The first British nuclear submarine was HMS Dreadnought (S101), laid down by Vickers Armstrong, Barrow-in-Furness, United Kingdom on 12 June 1859, launched on 21 October 1960, commissioned on 17 April 1963 and decommissioned in 1980.
3. First American nuclear merchant ship was the Savannah, building ordered in 1955, launched by New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Camden, New Jersey, USA with yard number 529 on 21 July 1959, completed in December 1961, maiden voyage begun on 20 August 1962 and decommissioned on 10 January 1972. IMO 5314793, cal sign KSAV. 

German shipyard interested in interested in building nuclear propelled tanker according to the Dutch newspaper Nieuwsblad van het Noorden dated 4 June 1958

An item reported that a shipyard at Hamburg, Germany possessed the designs for a 45.000 tons nuclear propelled tanker with a s building costs 70-80 million mark. A group of engineers studied the applications of nuclear energy for ships. American experience was to be used during the actual building.(1)

Note
1. The only German built nuclear propelled merchant ship was the Otto Hahn, ordered on 27 November 1962, laid down by Howaldtswerke, Kiel, Germany with yard number 1103 on 31 august 1963, launched on 13 June 1964, completed on 1 October, commissioned on 11 October 1968 and as the Liberian-flagged Madre sold to be broken up in 2009. IMO 6416770 and call sign A8GI9. First American nuclear merchant ship was the Savannah, building ordered in 1955, launched by New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Camden, New Jersey, USA with yard number 529 on 21 July 1959, completed in December 1961, maiden voyage begun on 20 August 1962 and decommissioned on 10 January 1972. IMO 5314793, cal sign KSAV. 

Monday, 23 April 2018

Dutch oil/chemical tanker (ex-Brovig Levanto 2011) Stolt Redshank 2011-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 7 April 2018

United Kingdom-flagged, IMO 9566746, MMSI 235089046 and call sign 2EXV5. Ex-Brovig Levanto renamed September 2011. Owned and managed by Stolt Tankers, Rotterdam, Netherlands. Built by Chongqing Chuandong Shipbuilding Industry, Fuling, China in 2011. 

American cabinet asked to built more nuclear propelled merchant ships according to the Dutch newspaper Het vrije volk dated 5 November 1964

Van Stoom tot Atoom, 1961
Text G.A.J. Bovens-drawings G.J. Frans Naerebout

An item reported that the shipping company American Export and Isbrandtsen Lines insisted that the American cabinet built more nuclear propelled merchant ships. The company was really interested and wanted to cooperate in designing, building and exploitation and to start with 4 ships with a service speed of 30  miles. The intention was to found a 14 days line between the USA and the Far East. Four nuclear propelled ships could replace 6 conventional ships they believed. At that moment she exploited the Savannah (1) and wanted to use this ship of the above mentioned line until the four new ships were realized, Her main condition was however that the personnel strength of the Savannah was to be decreased.

Note
1. First American nuclear merchant ship was the Savannah, building ordered in 1955, launched by New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Camden, New Jersey, USA with yard number 529 on 21 July 1959, completed in December 1961, maiden voyage begun on 20 August 1962 and decommissioned on 10 January 1972. IMO 5314793, cal sign KSAV. 

Swedish interested people stopped with developing nuclear propelled cargo ship according to the Dutch newspaper Het vrije volk dated 9 December 1965

An item reported that Swedish interested people finally decided to stop with pre studying the possibilities of building a 60.000 tons nuclear propelled cargo ship. Nuclear propulsion had no future they believed unless this kind of propulsion became considerably cheaper than the conventional power sources.

Dutch towing launch Seleh 1952-

Part of the fleet of the Afdeling Scheepvaart. Horsepower 40 hp. Expected in 1955. Stationed at Merauke, Netherlands New Guinea.

Source
Dutch Parliament session 1954-1955. Budget Netherlands New Guinea 1953-1954. Memory of response. Attachment No. 14. 

Dutch war ship Adam en Eva 1652

Of the admiralty van Amsterdam, first mentioned as a fishery patrol in 1652, captured by British in 1652 and with an armament of 24 guns. One archival source claims she belonged to the admiralty of the Noorderkwartier. 

Dutch warship Achilles 1644-1655

Of the admiralty van Amsterdam, built in 1644, last mentioned in 1655, dimensions 120 x 29 x 13, an armament of 28 guns and a crew numbering 90-120 men. 

Dutch transport Admiraal Tromp 1688

Of the admiralty Amsterdam, ship, hired Amsterdam, Netherlands as part of the fleet which brought king-stadtholder Willem III to England for ƒ 1.425 from Cornelis Admiraal from Uitdam, Netherlands in 1688, appraised value of ship ƒ 6.250, dimensions 101 x 25 x 11½, above 6. 

Swedish navy modernizing her fleet according to the magazine Mitteilungen aus dem Gebiete des Seewesens 1899 no. 1

Jacob Bagge

An item reported that the Swedish monitor Ericsson was rebuilt. The old turret was converted into a barbette turret with the 2-15cm guns protected by steel shields. Also the monitors 3rd class called armoured gunboats were rebuilt. The Berserk and Ulf were already completed with a main armament of 1-12cm quick firing gun. In the coming winter was the main armament of the remaining 3 vessels also to be replaced, The torpedo cruisers Jacob Bagge and Claes Horn were already launched, their sister ships Clas Uggla and Psilander were still lying on stocks.