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Wednesday, 29 June 2016

Moroccan patrol vessel OPV-70 Bir Anzarane (P341) 2010-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 29 June 2016

Morocco-flagged, MMSI 242050000 and call sign CNKE. Steel made hull with aluminium superstructures. Ocean patrol vessel-70 designed byRaidco Marine Lorient, France and launched at STX France SA on 25 August 2010 and commissioned on 23 June 2011. Primarily build for patrolling in the Moroccan exclusive economic zone and fishery controlling in the Atlantic Ocean. Displacement 800 tons and as dimensions 70 x 11 x 3,35 metres. Horsepower 8,17 MW delivered by 2 Wärtsilä 12V26 diesel engines allowing a speed of 20 knots and with a speed of 12 knots a range of 4.200 nautical miles and able to stay during 15 days on sea. Crew numbers 64 men. The armament consists of 1-7,6cm Otobreda gun, 1-4cm Bofors gun, 2-14,5mm machineguns and 2-12,7mm machineguns.

Polish reefer (ex-Del Monte Trader 1990-1993, Tundra Trader 1993-2004) Avila Star 2004-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 29 June 2016

Liberia-flagged, homeport Monrovia, IMO 8713550, MMSI 636013070 and call sign A8KJ9. Ex-Del Monte Trader renamed December 1993 and Tundra Trader renamed June 2004. Gross tonnage 11.590 (international)-11.833,65 (Suez)-11.857,93 (Panama) tons, net tonnage 6.230 (international)-8.824,33 (Suez)-8.931,78 (Panama) tons, summer deadweight 12.519 tons with a draft of 9,01 metres and as dimensions 158,50 (over all) x 23 x7 metres. In 1990 built by Navantia Carenas Puerto Real, Puerto Real, Spain. Owned and managed by Star Reefers Poland, Gdynia, Poland.

Italian oil/chemical tanker Valle Bianca 2007-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 28 June 2016

Italy-flagged, homeport Trieste, IMO 9387580, MMSI 247218600 and call sign ICEF. Owned and managed by Montanari Navigazione, Fano, Italy. Built by SPP Shipbuilding Tongyoung Shipyard, Tongyoung, South Korea in 2007.

Dutch handyzize dry bulkcarrier Hanze Genua 2015-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 29 June 2016

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Groningen, Netherlands. IMO 9746970, MMSI 244830401 and call sign PCZB. Built for account of and operated by Vlootfonds Hanzevast 3-ms Hanze Genua.

Russia congratulated England with the victory at the Battle of Jutland according to the Dutch newspaper Het nieuws van den dag voor Nederlandsch-Indië dated 9 June 1916

An item reported that the Russian minister Sazonoff send a telegram to the British minister of foreign affairs Earl Grey stating that he admired the bravery of the British fleet and condoled with the losses. The victory again proved the maritime superiority of England while the German fleet just fled without fighting back. Grey answered to be flattered with this words and remarked that the lives of the British sailors were not sacrificed in vain. Despite all efforts to conceal were the heavy losses of Germany well known.(1)

Note
1. Battle of Jutland or Skagerrak between the British and German navies 31 May-1 June 1916. British losses 6.094 men killed, 674 men wounded, l3 battle cruisers, 3 armoured cruisers, 8 destroyers total tonnage lost 113.300 tons and German losses 2.551 men killed, 507 wounded, 1 battle cruiser, 1 pre-dreadnought, 4 light cruisers, total tonnage 62.300 tons.

American naval shipbuilding program reduced according to the Dutch newspaper Het nieuws van den dag voor Nederlandsch-Indië dated 19 April 1919

Lexington-class

An item reported that the number of capital ships tot be built under the US 3 years naval program was reduced from 16 tot 10 ships caused by disagreeing experts about the value of battle cruisers.(1)  The naval commission in the House of Representatives approved the annual budget of 750 million including 169 million for new building. The costs of each of the 10 planned  battleships was 21 million and each of the 10 cruisers 8 million. A proposal dealing with the building of 130 smaller ships was yet not accepted until the department of navy decided with types were needed regarded the war experiences. The commission accepted the proposal of Daniels (2) to stop the building by the president of international treaties secured a world wide disarmament. (3)

Notes
1. Lexington-class consisting of the Lexington, Ranger, Constellation, Saratoga, Constitution and United States. Never completed as battle cruisers due to the limitations of the Naval Treaty of Washington of 1922. The Lexington and Saratoga were converted into aircraft carriers/ Designed as a response on the Japanese Kongo-class battle cruisers. General technical specifications. With a displacement of 44.200 tons/43.500 long tons-45.354 tons/44.638 long tons (deep load) were the dimensions 266,4 (over all) x 32,1 x 9,4 metres or 874 x 105.4 x 31 feet. The turbines and 16 water tube boilers supplied via 4 shafts 180.000 ship allowing a speed of 33 knots and with a speed of 10 knots a range of 10.000 nautical miles. The crew was to number 1.297-1.326 (when used as flagship). The armour consisted of a 12,7-17,8cm/5-7” thick belt, a deck of 3,8-5,7cm/1.5-2,25”, with the barbettes, gun turrets and coning tower protected by respectively 12,7-22,9cm/5-7‘, 16,2cm/6” (sides)-27,9cm/11” (front) and 30,5cm/12”. The armament was to consist pf 4x2-40,6cm/16” guns, 14x1-15,2cm/6” guns, 4x1-7,6cm/3” anti aircraft guns (to be increased with another 4) and 8-53,3cm/21” torpedo tubes.
2. Josephus Daniels (18 May 1862 Washington, North Carolina, USA-15 January 1948 Raleigh, North Carolina, USA). Secretary of navy 5 March 1913-4 March 1921, in 1933-1941 ambassador to Mexico.
3. The Washington Naval Treaty ratified 17 August 1923 signed between the five major naval powers at that moment (USA, United Kingdom, France, Italy and Japan) limited the numbers and displacement of battleships, battle cruisers and aircraft carriers to be kept and for the other ships like cruisers a maximum displacement of 10.000 tons and a maximum calibre of 8”. The London Naval Treaties of 1930 and 1936 modified the Washington Naval Treaty.

US House of Representatives approved large naval shipbuilding program according to the Dutch newspaper De Tribune dated 5 June 1916

An item reported that the US House of Representatives approved a bill for the building of 5 battle cruisers, 4 scout cruisers, 10 destroyers, 50 submarines and 130 aircraft.

British troop transport Manitou attacked by Turkish torpedo boat according to the Dutch newspaper Bataviaasch nieuwsblad dated 19 April 1915

An item dated London, England 17th referred to a statement of the British Admiralty that the British troop transport Manitou was attacked that day by a Turkish torpedo boat in the Aegian Sea. The three torpedoes fired by the torpedo boat all missed and she fled chased by the cruiser Minerva and destroyers. Finally the torpedo boat stranded on the coast of Chios and was destroyed. Her crew was taken prisoner. Around 100 men on board of the transport drowned. A day later stated the admiralty that 24 men were drowned and 27 missing, probably due to two boats capsizing. The Manitou herself was undamaged.

German minelayer cruiser SMS Albatross interned in Sweden after stranding according to the Dutch newspaper Bataviaasch nieuwsblad dated 5 July 1915

An item reported that after a fight with Russian cruisers the German minelayer Albatros stranded of Astorgearn. Of her crew were 21 men killed and 27 wounded who were interned in Sweden.(1)

Note
1. Minelayer cruiser of the Nautilus-class laid down at AG Weser, Bremen, Germany on 24 May 1907, launched on 23 October 1907, commissioned on 19 May 1908, deliberately stranded on the island of Gotland, Sweden, heavily damaged after a fight with Russian cruisers after lying a minefield of the Aland Islands on  2 July 1915, salvaged and interned the same month by the Swedish, returned to Germany in January 1919, stricken on 21 March 1921 and broken the same year.

German destroyer lost off Ostend, Belgium according to the Dutch newspaper Bataviaasch nieuwsblad dated 25 August 1915

An item reported that the Germans conformed the loss of a destroyer off Ostend, Belgium. Part of her crew was rescued.

German submarine torpedoed Russian auxiliary cruiser according to the Dutch newspaper Bataviaasch nieuwsblad dated 25 August 1915

An item reported that in the Finnish Gulf a German submarine torpedoed a Russian auxiliary cruiser.

German batteries damaged Russian torpedo boat in the Gulf of Riga according to the Dutch newspaper De Telegraaf dated 8 October 1915

An item dated Berlin, Germany 7th reported that German batteries in the Gulf of Riga damaged a Russian torpedo boat heavily.

Danish cabinet limited sale of merchant ships abroad according to the Dutch newspaper De Telegraaf dated 8 October 1915

An item dated Copenhagen, Denmark 7th reported that the Danish cabinet on the 6th announced that it was immediately forbidden to sale registered ships and ships with a temporarily Danish nationality certificate abroad.

Russia denied German version of the naval actions in the Baltic Sea according to the Dutch newspaper De Telegraaf dated 8 November 1915

An item dated Petrograd, Russia 7th responded on an article published by vice admiral Kirchhoff (1) in an American magazine dealing with the German Baltic squadron. Although Kirchhof was considered to be a naval expert in and outside Germany the Russians had remarks with the article. He claimed that after the fight between the Albatross (2) and Russian warships off the east coast of Gotland, Sweden the Russians despite being stronger in advance, fled when the German battleships which were far more powerful as their Russian equivalents entered the scene. This was far from the truth according to the Russian version while it was just the battleship Roon which arrived and refused the fight with the stronger Russian squadron. The Russians confirmed that German armoured cruisers were much powerful compared with the Russian, about 4 times stronger. In the beginning of the war were all German cruisers weaker as the Russian ones which as result concluded the Russian that they sent large cruisers and dreadnoughts to the Baltic Sea. This reinforcement was yet not arrived during the fight with the Albatros.

Notes
1. Hermann Kirchhoff (22 February 1851 Hanerau-25 August 1932, Strub, Oberbayern, Germany), naval officer and military historian. Author of the essay Einfluss der Seemacht auf der Geschichte der Ostseestaaten.
2. Minelayer cruiser of the Nautilus-class laid down at AG Weser, Bremen, Germany on 24 May 1907, launched on 23 October 1907, commissioned on 19 May 1908, deliberately stranded on the island of Gotland, Sweden, heavily damaged after a fight with Russian cruisers after lying a minefield of the Aland Islands on  2 July 1915, salvaged and interned the same month by the Swedish, returned to Germany in January 1919, stricken on 21 March 1921 and broken the same year.

Tuesday, 28 June 2016

Chinese car carrier Galveston Highway 2014-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 19 June 2016

Panama-flagged, IMO 9675573, MMSI 353100000 and call sign 3FAJ5. Built at the Imabari Shipbuilding Marugame Yard, Marugame, Japan in 2014. Owned and managed by Northstar Shipmanagement, Hong Kong, China.

General cargo ship Marielle Bolten 1997-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 19 June 2016

Liberia-flagged, homeport Monrovia, Liberia, IMO 9149653, MMSI 636090499 and call sign ELZH9. Owned and managed by Aug. Bolten Wm. Miller’s Nachfolger, Hamburg, Germany. Built at the Dalian Shipyard, Dalian, China in 1997.

Turkish oil/chemical tanker STI Comandante 2014-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 19 June 2016

Marshall Islands-flagged, IMO 9686857, MMSI 538005398 and call sign V7DL6. owned and managed by Scorpio Commercial Management, Istanbul, Turkey. Built at the Hyundai Mipo Dockyard, Ulsan, South Korea in 2014.

Singapore oil/chemical tanker Alpine Meadow 2010-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 19 June 2016

Marshall Islands-flagged, IMO 9478688, MMSI 538003845 and call sign V7TO5. Owned by ST Shipping&Transport, Singapore and managed by Sea World Management&Trading, Athens, Greece, Built by SPP Shipbuilding Tongyoung Shipyard, Tongyoung, South Korea.

Polish reefer (ex-Costa Rican Star 1998, Hornwind 1998-2002) Costa Rican Star 2002-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 19 June 2016

Liberia-flagged, homeport Monrovia, Liberia, IMO 9150822, MMSI 636013073 and call sign A8KK4. Owned by Star Reefers Poland, Gdynia, Poland and managed by Star Reefers UK, London, England. Built at the Shikoku Dockyard, Takamatsu, Japan in 1998.

Dutch steam fishing vessel Zaanstroom IV released by Germans according to the Dutch newspaper Algemeen Handelsblad dated 15 December 1916

An item reported that the owners at Ijmuiden, Netherlands of the seized Dutch steam fishing vessel Zaanstroom IV a telegram received that she on Thursday morning at Cuxhaven, Germany was released and departed towards sea.

Many wounded German marines left Zeebrugge seeking refugee at Brugge, Belgium according to the Dutch newspaper Bataviaasch nieuwsblad dated 29 March 1916

An item dated Amsterdam, Netherlands 22nd reported that numerous wounded German marines coming from Zeebrugge, Belgium arrived at Brugge, Belgium escaping from the Allied bombardment, Some patrol vessels and destroyers also left Zeebruggge. Later towed one destroyer another into the harbour of Zeebrugge. A German submarine was sighted close under the Dutch coast.

German auxiliary cruiser Hermann attacked by Russian destroyers according to the Dutch newspaper Bataviaasch nieuwsblad dated 16 June 1916

An item dated London, England 15th reported that south east of Stockholm, Sweden four Russian destroyers destroyed an auxiliary cruiser. A second item dated The Hague, Netherlands 14h reported that this was the German auxiliary cruiser Hermann but that her own crew scuttled her off Norrköping, Sweden. The major part of her crew included her commanding officer was rescued.

Wreckage belonging to a German warship washed up on the island Refshalem according to the Dutch newspaper Bataviaasch nieuwsblad dated 30 October 1916

An item dated Copenhagen, Denmark 28th referred to the Danish magazine Ekstrabladet reporting that a large quantity of wreckage belonging to a German warship washed up on the beach of the island Refshalem.

Dutch government organized convoy system towards England according to the Dutch newspaper Bataviaasch nieuwsblad dated 29 March 1916

An item dated Amsterdam, Netherlands 28th referred to an official statement of the Dutch cabinet reporting that as a service for the Dutch merchant shipping a vessel fitted with a wireless telegraphy device was stationed near the light ship Noord-Hinder and that the ships in convoys were to be escorted by tugs and minehunters to the British waters.

German torpedo boat sunk off Falster, Denmark according to the Dutch newspaper Rotterdamsch nieuwsblad dated 20 May 1916

An item Copenhagen, Denmark 18th referred to tidings received from Malmö reporting that a German torpedo boat off Falster entered a minefield and sunk. Except for one sailor was her crew rescued by another torpedo boat.

Russian torpedo boat sunk south of Varna, Bulgaria according to the Dutch newspaper Algemeen Handelsblad 12 March 1916

An item dated Sofia, Bulgaria 10th reported that the day before a Russian torpedo boat hit a mine south of Varna and sunk. Bulgarian military rescued 4 officers and 11 sailors.

Monday, 27 June 2016

British armoured cruiser HMS Kent 1900-1920

Drake-class

Monmouth-class

Devonshire-class

Laid down at Portsmouth Dockyard on 12 February 1900, launched on 6 March 1901, completed on 1 October 1903, destroyed in the Battle of the Falklands the German light cruiser SMS Nürnberg (1) on 8 December 1914, attacked with the HMS Glasgow (2) the German light cruiser SMS Dresden (3) in the Battle of the Chilean island Más a Tierra ending in her being scuttled in the Cumberland Bay (Robinso Crusoe Island, begin 1919 ordered to support at Vladivostok, Russia the so-called  Siberian Intervention during the civil war going on in Russia and at Hong Kong in March 1920 for sale to be broken up and finally sold on 20 June 1920. Building costs 700.283-733.940 pond sterling.

Notes
1. Königsberg-light cruiser, laid down at Howaldtswerke, Kiel, Germany in 1906, launched on 28 April 1906 and commissioned on 10 Aril 1908. Armament consisted of 10-10,5cm/4.1” quick firing guns and 2-45cm/18” torpedo tubes.
2. Dresden-class light cruiser, Laid down by Fairfield Shipbuilding&Engineering, Govan, Scotland on 25 March 1909, launched on 30 September 1909, commissioned in September 1910 and sold to be broken up in 29 April 1927. Armament consisted of 2x1-15,2cm/6” breech loading Mk XI guns, 10x1-10,2cm/4” breech loading Mk VII guns, 4-4,7cm/1.9”/3pd quick firing guns and 2-45,7cm/18” torpedo tubes.
3. Laid down at Blohm&Voss, Hamburg, Germany in 1906, launched on 15 October 1907 and commissioned on 14 November 1908.Armament consisted of 10-10,4cm/4.1” quick firing L/40 guns, 8-5,2cm/2” quick firing L/55 guns and 2-45cm.17.7” torpedo tubes. 

British armoured cruiser HMS Cornwall 1901-1920

Drake-class

Monmouth-class

Devonshire-class

Laid down at the Pembroke Dockyard on 11 March 1901, launched on 29 October 1902, completed on 1 December 1904, refitted to be used as cadet training ship, participated in the Battle of the Falklands Islands on 8 December 1914, cadet training ship in 1919, paid of on 21 August 1919 and sold to be broken up on 7 June 1920. Building costs 756.274-789.421 pond sterling. Of the Monmouth-class also called County-class, built to act against light cruisers and armed merchant ships consisting of the Monmouth, Bedford, Essex, Kent, Berwick, Cornwall, Cumberland. Donegal, Lancaster and Suffolk. Preceded by the Drake-class and succeeded by the Devonshire-class. General technical specifications. Displacement 10.000 (normal) and as dimensions 141,3 (over all) x 20,1 x 7,6 metres or 463.6 x 66 x 25 feet. Horsepower of 22.000 ihp supplied by 2-4 cylinder triple expansion steam engines and 31 water tube -boilers allowing a speed of 23 knots. Their crew numbered 678 men. The armour consisted of a 5,1-10,2cm/2-4” thick deck, 1,9-5,1cm/0.75-2” thick decks, 12,7cm/5” thick bulkheads with the gun turrets and conning tower protected by respectively 13c,/5” and 25,4cm/10”.  The armament consisted of 2x1+10x1-15,2cm/6” breech loading MkVII guns, 10x1-7,6cm/3”/12pd quick firing 12 cwt guns, 34,7cm/3pd quick firing Hotchkiss guns and 2x1-45cm/18” torpedo tubes. 

British armoured cruiser HMS Berwick 1901-1920 (1922)

Drake-class

Monmouth-class

Devonshire-class

Laid down by W. Beardmore&Company on 19 April 1901, launched on 20 September 1902, completed on 9 December 1903, refitted in 1908-1909, paid off in 1919, sold to be broken up on 1 July 1920 which was executed in Germany in 1922. Building costs 750,984-776.868 pond sterling. Of the Monmouth-class also called County-class, built to act against light cruisers and armed merchant ships consisting of the Monmouth, Bedford, Essex, Kent, Berwick, Cornwall, Cumberland. Donegal, Lancaster and Suffolk. Preceded by the Drake-class and succeeded by the Devonshire-class. General technical specifications. Displacement 10.000 (normal) and as dimensions 141,3 (over all) x 20,1 x 7,6 metres or 463.6 x 66 x 25 feet. Horsepower of 22.000 ihp supplied by 2-4 cylinder triple expansion steam engines and 31 water tube -boilers allowing a speed of 23 knots. Their crew numbered 678 men. The armour consisted of a 5,1-10,2cm/2-4” thick deck, 1,9-5,1cm/0.75-2” thick decks, 12,7cm/5” thick bulkheads with the gun turrets and conning tower protected by respectively 13c,/5” and 25,4cm/10”.  The armament consisted of 2x1+10x1-15,2cm/6” breech loading MkVII guns, 10x1-7,6cm/3”/12pd quick firing 12 cwt guns, 34,7cm/3pd quick firing Hotchkiss guns and 2x1-45cm/18” torpedo tubes. 

British armoured cruiser HMS Donegal 1901-1920

Drake-class

Monmouth-class

Devonshire-class

Laid down by Fairfield, Govan, Scotland on 14 February 1901, launched on 4 September 1902, commissioned on 5 November 1903 and sol to be broken up on 1 July 1920. Building costs 715.497-752.964 pond sterling. Of the Monmouth-class also called County-class, built to act against light cruisers and armed merchant ships consisting of the Monmouth, Bedford, Essex, Kent, Berwick, Cornwall, Cumberland. Donegal, Lancaster and Suffolk. Preceded by the Drake-class and succeeded by the Devonshire-class. General technical specifications. Displacement 10.000 (normal) and as dimensions 141,3 (over all) x 20,1 x 7,6 metres or 463.6 x 66 x 25 feet. Horsepower of 22.000 ihp supplied by 2-4 cylinder triple expansion steam engines and 31 water tube -boilers allowing a speed of 23 knots. Their crew numbered 678 men. The armour consisted of a 5,1-10,2cm/2-4” thick deck, 1,9-5,1cm/0.75-2” thick decks, 12,7cm/5” thick bulkheads with the gun turrets and conning tower protected by respectively 13c,/5” and 25,4cm/10”.  The armament consisted of 2x1+10x1-15,2cm/6” breech loading MkVII guns, 10x1-7,6cm/3”/12pd quick firing 12 cwt guns, 34,7cm/3pd quick firing Hotchkiss guns and 2x1-45cm/18” torpedo tubes. 

British armoured cruiser HMS Cumberland 1901-1921 (1923)

Drake-class

Monmouth-class

Devonshire-class

Laid down by London&Glasgow Shipping Company, Glasgow, Scotland on 19 February 1901, launched on 16 December 1902, completed on 1 December 1904, refitted in 1907-1908, training ship in 1908, paid off at Queenstown, Ireland in April 1920, sold to be broken up on 9 May 1921 which was executed at Briton Ferry, Wales, England in 1923. Building costs 817.168-751.508 pond sterling. Of the Monmouth-class also called County-class, built to act against light cruisers and armed merchant ships consisting of the Monmouth, Bedford, Essex, Kent, Berwick, Cornwall, Cumberland. Donegal, Lancaster and Suffolk. Preceded by the Drake-class and succeeded by the Devonshire-class. General technical specifications. Displacement 10.000 (normal) and as dimensions 141,3 (over all) x 20,1 x 7,6 metres or 463.6 x 66 x 25 feet. Horsepower of 22.000 ihp supplied by 2-4 cylinder triple expansion steam engines and 31 water tube -boilers allowing a speed of 23 knots. Their crew numbered 678 men. The armour consisted of a 5,1-10,2cm/2-4” thick deck, 1,9-5,1cm/0.75-2” thick decks, 12,7cm/5” thick bulkheads with the gun turrets and conning tower protected by respectively 13c,/5” and 25,4cm/10”.  The armament consisted of 2x1+10x1-15,2cm/6” breech loading MkVII guns, 10x1-7,6cm/3”/12pd quick firing 12 cwt guns, 34,7cm/3pd quick firing Hotchkiss guns and 2x1-45cm/18” torpedo tubes. 

British armoured cruiser HMS Lancaster 1901-1920

Drake-class

Monmouth-class

Devonshire-class

Laid down at Armstrong, Elswick, England on 4 March 1901, launched on 22 March 1903, completed on 5 April 1904, added to the reserve in 1912, recommissioned in 1913, sold to be broken up on 3 March 1920 which was executed at Blyth, England. Building costs 732.858-763,084 pond sterling. Of the Monmouth-class also called County-class, built to act against light cruisers and armed merchant ships consisting of the Monmouth, Bedford, Essex, Kent, Berwick, Cornwall, Cumberland. Donegal, Lancaster and Suffolk. Preceded by the Drake-class and succeeded by the Devonshire-class. General technical specifications. Displacement 10.000 (normal) and as dimensions 141,3 (over all) x 20,1 x 7,6 metres or 463.6 x 66 x 25 feet. Horsepower of 22.000 ihp supplied by 2-4 cylinder triple expansion steam engines and 31 water tube -boilers allowing a speed of 23 knots. Their crew numbered 678 men. The armour consisted of a 5,1-10,2cm/2-4” thick deck, 1,9-5,1cm/0.75-2” thick decks, 12,7cm/5” thick bulkheads with the gun turrets and conning tower protected by respectively 13c,/5” and 25,4cm/10”.  The armament consisted of 2x1+10x1-15,2cm/6” breech loading MkVII guns, 10x1-7,6cm/3”/12pd quick firing 12 cwt guns, 34,7cm/3pd quick firing Hotchkiss guns and 2x1-45cm/18” torpedo tubes. 

British armoured cruiser HMS Suffolk 1901-1920 (1922)

Drake-class

Monmouth-class

Devonshire-class

Laid down at Portsmouth Dockyard on 25 March 1901, launched on 15 January 1903, completed on 21 May 1904, refitted in 1909, refitted in 1912, cadet training ship in 1919, on the sale list in April 1920, sold to be broken up on 1 July 1920 which was executed in Germany in 1922. Building costs 722,-681-783.054 pond sterling. Of the Monmouth-class also called County-class, built to act against light cruisers and armed merchant ships consisting of the Monmouth, Bedford, Essex, Kent, Berwick, Cornwall, Cumberland. Donegal, Lancaster and Suffolk. Preceded by the Drake-class and succeeded by the Devonshire-class. General technical specifications. Displacement 10.000 (normal) and as dimensions 141,3 (over all) x 20,1 x 7,6 metres or 463.6 x 66 x 25 feet. Horsepower of 22.000 ihp supplied by 2-4 cylinder triple expansion steam engines and 31 water tube -boilers allowing a speed of 23 knots. Their crew numbered 678 men. The armour consisted of a 5,1-10,2cm/2-4” thick deck, 1,9-5,1cm/0.75-2” thick decks, 12,7cm/5” thick bulkheads with the gun turrets and conning tower protected by respectively 13c,/5” and 25,4cm/10”.  The armament consisted of 2x1+10x1-15,2cm/6” breech loading MkVII guns, 10x1-7,6cm/3”/12pd quick firing 12 cwt guns, 34,7cm/3pd quick firing Hotchkiss guns and 2x1-45cm/18” torpedo tubes. 

British armoured cruiser HMS Essex 1900-1921

Drake-class

Monmouth-class

Devonshire-class

Laid down at Pembroke Dockyard on 1 January 1900, launched on 29 August 1901, completed on 22 March 1904, added to the reserve in March 1906, decommissioned in September 1909, refitted in 1913, paid off in August 1916, decommissioned becoming destroyer depot ship at Devonport, England in 1916, accommodation ship in April 1918 at Devonport, training ship 1 December 1918, again accommodation ship around 1 May 1919, paid off in October 1919 and sold to be broken up on 8 November 1921 which was executed in Germany. Building costs 736,557-770,325 pond sterling. Of the Monmouth-class also called County-class, built to act against light cruisers and armed merchant ships consisting of the Monmouth, Bedford, Essex, Kent, Berwick, Cornwall, Cumberland. Donegal, Lancaster and Suffolk. Preceded by the Drake-class and succeeded by the Devonshire-class. General technical specifications. Displacement 10.000 (normal) and as dimensions 141,3 (over all) x 20,1 x 7,6 metres or 463.6 x 66 x 25 feet. Horsepower of 22.000 ihp supplied by 2-4 cylinder triple expansion steam engines and 31 water tube -boilers allowing a speed of 23 knots. Their crew numbered 678 men. The armour consisted of a 5,1-10,2cm/2-4” thick deck, 1,9-5,1cm/0.75-2” thick decks, 12,7cm/5” thick bulkheads with the gun turrets and conning tower protected by respectively 13c,/5” and 25,4cm/10”.  The armament consisted of 2x1+10x1-15,2cm/6” breech loading MkVII guns, 10x1-7,6cm/3”/12pd quick firing 12 cwt guns, 34,7cm/3pd quick firing Hotchkiss guns and 2x1-45cm/18” torpedo tubes.

British armoured cruiser HMS Bedford 1900-1910

Drake-class

Monmouth-class

Devonshire-class

Laid down by Fairfield, Govan, Scotland on 19 February 1900, launched on 31 August 1901, completed on 11 November 1903, added to the reserve in 1906, decommissioned in February 1907 run aground  at Quelpart Island [South Korea], East China Sea on 21 August 1910 and sold to be broken up on 10 October 1910. Building costs 706.020-734.330 pond sterling. Of the Monmouth-class also called County-class, built to act against light cruisers and armed merchant ships consisting of the Monmouth, Bedford, Essex, Kent, Berwick, Cornwall, Cumberland. Donegal, Lancaster and Suffolk. Preceded by the Drake-class and succeeded by the Devonshire-class. General technical specifications. Displacement 10.000 (normal) and as dimensions 141,3 (over all) x 20,1 x 7,6 metres or 463.6 x 66 x 25 feet. Horsepower of 22.000 ihp supplied by 2-4 cylinder triple expansion steam engines and 31 water tube -boilers allowing a speed of 23 knots. Their crew numbered 678 men. The armour consisted of a 5,1-10,2cm/2-4” thick deck, 1,9-5,1cm/0.75-2” thick decks, 12,7cm/5” thick bulkheads with the gun turrets and conning tower protected by respectively 13c,/5” and 25,4cm/10”.  The armament consisted of 2x1+10x1-15,2cm/6” breech loading MkVII guns, 10x1-7,6cm/3”/12pd quick firing 12 cwt guns, 34,7cm/3pd quick firing Hotchkiss guns and 2x1-45cm/18” torpedo tubes.

British armoured cruiser HMS Monmouth 1899-1914

British Drake-class

Britism Monmouth-class


British Devonshire-class

German SMS Gneisenau

Laid down by London and Glasgow Shipping Company. Govan, Scotland on 29 August 1899, launched on 13 November 1901, completed on 2 December 1903 and sunk during the Battle of Coronel against a German squadron on 1 November 1914 with her entire crew of 735 men. She was heavily damaged by the SM Gneisenau (1) and finally capsized after the German light cruiser SMS Nürnberg (2) attacked her. Building costs 709.085-979.591 pond sterling. Of the Monmouth-class also called County-class, built to act against light cruisers and armed merchant ships consisting of the Monmouth, Bedford, Essex, Kent, Berwick, Cornwall, Cumberland. Donegal, Lancaster and Suffolk. Preceded by the Drake-class and succeeded by the Devonshire-class. General technical specifications. Displacement 10.000 (normal) and as dimensions 141,3 (over all) x 20,1 x 7,6 metres or 463.6 x 66 x 25 feet. Horsepower of 22.000 ihp supplied by 2-4 cylinder triple expansion steam engines and 31 water tube -boilers allowing a speed of 23 knots. Their crew numbered 678 men. The armour consisted of a 5,1-10,2cm/2-4” thick deck, 1,9-5,1cm/0.75-2” thick decks, 12,7cm/5” thick bulkheads with the gun turrets and conning tower protected by respectively 13c,/5” and 25,4cm/10”.  The armament consisted of 2x1+10x1-15,2cm/6” breech loading MkVII guns, 10x1-7,6cm/3”/12pd quick firing 12 cwt guns, 34,7cm/3pd quick firing Hotchkiss guns and 2x1-45cm/18” torpedo tubes.

Notes
1. Laid down at the shipyard of AG Weser, Bremen, Germany with yard number 144 on 28 December 1904, launched on 14 June 1906, building costs more as 19 million goldmarks, commissioned on 6 March 1908 and sunk in a battle with the British fleet during the so-called Battle of the Falkland Islands on 8 December 1914. Of the Schanhorst-class consisting of the Scharnhorst and the Gneisenau. Preceded by the Roon-class and succeeded by the SMS Blücher. General technical specifications of this class. Displacement 11.616 tons/11.433 long tons12.804 short tons (standard)-12.985 tons/12.780 long tons/14.314 short tons (full load) with as dimensions 143.8 (waterline) 144,6 (overall) x 21,6 x 8,37 metres or 472-474.5 x 70.10 x 26.6 feet. The 3 shaft triple expansion engines and 18 water-tube boilers supplied 26.000 ihp (design) allowing a speed of 22,7 knots; during trials 30.396 ihp and a speed of 23,6 knots. Coal bunker capacity 800 tons/880 short tons (standard)-2.000 tons/2.200 short tons (maximum). Range with a cruising speed of 12 knots was 4.800 nautical miles. Their crew numbered 840 men (included 52 officers). The armour consisted of a 15cm/5.9” thick belt, a 3,5-6cm/1.4-2.4” thick deck and with the gun turrets protected by 18c,/7.1” thick armour. The armament consisted of 2x4&4x1-21cm/8.3” L/40 quick firing guns, 6x1-15cm/5.9” L/40 quick firing guns, 18x1-8,8cm/3.5” guns and 4-45cm/18” submerged torpedo tubes (1x bow, 2 sides, 1 stern).
2. Königsberg-light cruiser, laid down at Howaldtswerke, Kiel, Germany in 1906, launched on 28 April 1906 and commissioned on 10 Aril 1908. Armament consisted of 10-10,5cm/4.1” quick firing guns and 2-45cm/18” torpedo tubes.

Russian torpedo boats harassing Black Sea cities according to the Dutch newspaper Het nieuws van den dag voor Nederlandsch-Indië dated 6 April 1918

An item reported that Bolshevist torpedo boats of the Russian Black Sea Fleet bombarding and plundering the cities in the area and afterwards selling the gain.

German navy still using Zeebrugge, Belgium as naval base according to the Dutch newspaper Het volk dated 27 April 1917

An item dated Berlin, Germany 27th reported that on the 24th German torpedo boats and a day later submarines left their base at Zeebrugge, Belgium on the same way as usual.

German navy activities around Dutch island Ameland according to the Dutch newspaper De Telegraaf dated 2 April 1918

An item dated Nes, Ameland, Netherlands 1th reported that 12 large German torpedo boats cruised around the west following 4 planes. Off the coast of Ameland patrolled9 torpedo boats and patrol vessels.

US Navy ordered convoying for coastal shipping according to the Dutch newspaper Algemeen Handelsblad dated 12 June 1918

An item dated London, England 12th referred to the Morning Post reporting that the US Department of Navy decided to introduce a convoy system to protect the coastal shipping against submarine attacks in the future.

Allied warfare against German submarine successful according to the Dutch newspper Bataviaasch nieuwsblad dated 14 June 1918

An item dated Paris, France 11th reported that the British-French warfare against the German submarines became more and more successful. Especially the minefield laid down (by mainly the British) in the North Sea was one of the most successful anti submarine measures.

German naval losses during fight off Dunkirk, France according to the Dutch newspaper De Tribune dated 22 March 1918

An item reported that off Dunkirk, France according a British naval tiding Allied forces fought with German naval units resulting in the loss of 2 German destroyers and 2 torpedo boats.

Allied and German naval activities along French-Belgian coastline according to the Dutch newspaper Nieuwsblad van Friesland dated 19 April 1918

An item dated Berlin, Germany 18th reported that in the night Allied forces fired from sea at Ostend, Belgium although without damaging any military works. German torpedo boats fired in the morning at allied encampments between Dunkirk, France en Nieuwpoort, Belgium firing 600 shots.

British and German battle fleets battling near Jutland according to the Dutch newspaper Het nieuws van den dag voor Nederlandsch-Indië dated 5 June 1916

An item dated London, England 8th reported officially that in the afternoon of 31st May the British and German fleets battled near Jutland.(1) The British battle cruiser squadron supported by some cruisers and small cruisers first contacted the enemy. The battleships suffered heavily. The British admiralty stated that the British lost totally 8 destroyers. One German battleship of the Kaiser-class was destroyed and another of the same-class probably also destroyed.

Note
1. Battle of Jutland or Skagerrak between the British and German navies 31 May-1 June 1916. British losses 6.094 men killed, 674 men wounded, l3 battle cruisers, 3 armoured cruisers, 8 destroyers total tonnage lost 113.300 tons and German losses 2.551 men killed, 507 wounded, 1 battle cruiser, 1 pre-dreadnought, 4 light cruisers, total tonnage 62.300 tons.

Sunday, 26 June 2016

Germany claiming sinking British battleship HMS Warspite according to the Dutch newspaper De Tribune dated 5 June 1916


An item referred to a statement of the British Admiralty reporting that the claim by the German chairman of the Parliament as mentioned in a telegram sent to the German embassy at Washington, USA that the British battleship War spite (1) during the last battle (2) was nonsense. She returned safely in the harbour just like the Alcasta did. The Royal British navy lost 8 destroyers included the until then unknown Nomade (3), Nestor (4) and Shark (5).

Notes
1. Of the Queen-Elizabeth-class consisting of the Queen Elizabeth, Malaya, Warspite, Valiant, Barham, Malaya and the in 1914 cancelled Agincourt. Preceded by the Iron Duke-class and succeeded by the Revenge-class. Pennant 03. Laid down at the HMD Dockyard Devonport, England on 31 October 1912, launched on 26 November 1913, commissioned on 8 March 1915, modernized in 1924 and March 1934-March 1937, decommissioned on 1 February 1945,while underway to be broken up run aground at Prussian Cove around 19 April 1947. Efforts to salvage her in 1950 were not successful and after she was finally beached off St. Michael’s Mount {Marazion, England] and there broken up. Displacement 33.110 (normal)-33.794 (deep load) tons and as dimensions 196,82 (over all) x 27,58 x 10,1 metres or 643.9 x 90.7 x 33 feet. Two sets Brown-Curtiss direct drive steam turbines and 24 Yarrow boilers supplied via 4 shaft 75.000 shp allowing a speed of 24 knots. With a oil bunker capacity of 3.400 ton and a speed of 12 knots was their range 5.000 nautical miles. The crew numbered between 1.025-1.262-1.920 (as flagship) men. The armament consisted of 4x2-38,1cm/15” Mk I guns, 14x1-15,2cm/6” breech loading Mk XII guns, 2x1-3” quick firing anti aircraft guns, 4x1-3pd/4,7cm saluting guns and 4-53cm/21” submerged torpedo tubes. Krupp cemented armour consisted of a 4”(end aft)-6” (end fore)-13” middle thick belt, upper belt 6”, 4 and 6” bulkheads for and aft, gun turrets, barbettes and conning tower protected by respectively 4.25” (top)-11” (sides)-13” (face), 4-6” (below belt)-7-10” (above belt) and 3” (roof)-4” (revolving hood)-11” (sides), 6” guns protected by 6” thick armour and conning tower tube, torpedo conning tower and torpedo conning tower tube by respectively 4-6”, 6“ and 4“.
2. Battle of Jutland or Skagerrak between the British and German navies 31 May-1 June 1916. British losses 6.094 men killed, 674 men wounded, l3 battle cruisers, 3 armoured cruisers, 8 destroyers total tonnage lost 113.300 tons and German losses 2.551 men killed, 507 wounded, 1 battle cruiser, 1 pre-dreadnought, 4 light cruisers, total tonnage 62.300 tons.
3. The Nomad of the M-class, launched by Styephen on 7 February 1916, sunk during the Battle of Jutland.
4. Of the M-class, launched at Swan Hunter on 22 December 1915, sunk during the Battle of Jutland.
5. Launched at Swan Hunter on 30 July 1912 sunk during the Battle of Jutland.

French destroyers destroyed German destroyer off Ostend, Belgium according to the Dutch newspaper Bataviaasch nieuwsblad dated 25 August 1915

An item dated Paris, France 23rd reported that the same day two French destroyers destroyed after a night a German destroyer off Ostend, Belgium. The hulls of the French destroyers were hardly damaged.

German float plane attacked Russian destroyers in the Gulf of Riga according to the Dutch newspaper De Telegraaf dated 21 June 1916

An item dated Berlin, Germany 20th reported that on the 16th a German float plane bombed in the Gulf of Riga off Arensburg [=Kuressaare, Estonia] two Russian destroyers hitting one.

German losses in actions against Russian warships in the Gulf of Riga according to the Dutch newspaper Bataviaasch nieuwsblad dated 25 August 1915

An item dated Petrograd, Russia 23rd reported that on the 19th and 20th despite the battle was going on German ships still continued with reconnaissance tasks in the Gulf of Riga. The German losses were heavy due to the Russian torpedo boats with the Russians losing the gunboat Sivoutch in battle against a German cruiser. On the 21st retreated the German forces loosing since the 16th 2 cruisers and 8 destroyers or destroyed or heavily damaged.

Dutch naval sailors protesting in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Het nieuws van den dag voor Nederlandsch-Indië dated 5 June 1916

An item reported that Hugenholtz, social democratic member of the Dutch Second Chamber asked the minister of navy for full details about the complaints of the sailors at Surabaya. Dutch East Indies, what caused the riots, what was done to solve the complaints and what ere the results for the involved men.

Questions in Dutch Parliament about sending sea militia towards the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Het nieuws van den dag voor Nederlandsch-Indië dated 5 June 1916

An item reported that De Meester, member of the Dutch Second Chamber asked the Dutch of minister of navy for more details about the sending of 350 men sea militia/conscripts towards the Dutch East Indies. He wanted to know if the men were all volunteers if not how many and the if there were none volunteers, intended the minister to use his empowerment conform article 76 of the Militiewet? De Meester also wanted to know if this was an extra ordinary decision or that it was to become regular policy.

German ferry and torpedo boat collided according to the Dutch newspaper Bredasche courant dated 21 October 1915

An item reported that from Sweden was reported that the German ferry which left on Friday evening Trelleborg, Sweden with none lights on overrun a large German torpedo boat, cutting in to two halves. Of her crew just 5 of the 45 men on board were rescued.

Italian submarine destroyed Austrian torpedo boat in the Gulf of Trieste Het nieuws van den dag voor Nederlandsch-Indië dated 14 June 1915

An item reported that an Austrian torpedo boat which intended to leave the Gulf of Trieste was destroyed by an Italian submarine and that none of her crew survived.

US Navy seizing Dutch merchant ships according to the Dutch newspaper De Tribune dated 22 March 1918

An item reported that at 19.00 o’clock the day before the American minister of navy announced the immediately seizure of the Dutch merchant ships. Some Dutch sailors were engaged on board of these ships, others who want to stay in the USA were paid by the US government and the ones who want to return to the Netherlands were transported as soon as possible.

A second item reported that the US department for shipping intended to use Dutch ships for transport of victuals ordering that all (luxury) cabins and all free space of the passenger ships were to be used for the storage of corn. The remaining space in the casks for storing tin cans was to be filled with corn or rice.

German and British naval forces fighting off Ostend, Belgium according to the Dutch newspaper De Tribune dated 29 June 1918

An item reported that off Ostend, Belgium British destroyers and German torpedo boats battled. According to the German tiding was the fight of little importance.

German sailors fitting out torpedo boats interned at Hellevoetsluis, Netehrlands according to the Dutch newspaper De Telegraaf dated 19 April 1919

An item dated Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands 18th reported that 20 men of the German navy were to be accommodated at the navy yard there to fit out the there lying interned German torpedo boats. Another newspaper Maas- en Scheldebode of the same date reported that the men were accommodate on board of the Hr. Ms. Van Galen.

German minesweepers used for sweeping First World War mines on the North Sea according to the Dutch newspaper Heldersche Courant dated Tuesday 15 July 1919

An item reported that the rough weather in the past days forced German minesweepers to enter the roads of Nieuwediep, Netherlands. The ships were used for sweeping the mines laid in the First World War on the North Sea. It were 14 large mine sweepers and 3 torpedo boats. The ships sighted damaged and somehow in disorder. One of the 3 minesweepers lying in the harbour seemed to have machinery problems. On Monday morning was a short trial made. The cut equipment used for the mines comparable with the one used by the Royal Netherlands Navy was since 1917 used by the German navy. Since then was minesweeping less dangerous. When asked replied the German crew that they had at least work until 1920. The German minesweepers were especially built for minesweeping. Length 50 metres, draught 2,5 metres and a displacement of 500 tons. Total horsepower of the two engines was 1.700 hp. The armament consisted of 1-7,5cm on the poop and 1-8,8cm gun aft. Their crew numbered 50-60 men; the men served original on board several ships within the German navy. The flotilla commanded by oberleutnant Olff had as homeport Wilhemshaven, Germany and usual was fuel and water loaded at Emden, Germany. The torpedo boats were rebuilt and used to accommodate the chiefs of the flotilla’s and the half flotilla’s and further more to transport a storage fuel oil.

German torpedo boats coming from Antwerp, Belgium interned in the Netherlands according to the Dutch newspaper Heldersche Courant dated Tuesday 19 November 1918

An item reported the arrival at Bath, Netherlands of 11 German torpedo boats fled from Antwerp, Netherlands and which were now interned. The newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated Monday 18th reported that on Saturday afternoon 11 German torpedo boats arrived at Hansweert coming from Antwerp. They were described as small patrol vessels in the past via the canal from Zeebrugge, Belgium steamed towards Antwerp. Three tugs towed the boats to Hansweert. On board were 3 Germanofficers and 2 sailors, all to be interned at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands. The newspaper De Zeeuw dated 18th reported the departure that morning from Wemeldinge, Netherlands of the torpedo boats escorted by a Dutch warship towards Hellevoetsluis to be there interned.  The newspaper Maas- en Scheldebode dated 20th reported the arrival at Hellevoetsluis of 5 torpedo boats coming from Hellevoetsluis and probably to be laid up in the canal.

German torpedo boats to be converted into merchant ships according to the Dutch newspaper Algemeen Handelsblad dated 7 October 1919

An item referred to the shipping magazine Hansa reporting that a shipyard at Danzig bought two large torpedo boats for the German naval yard with the intention to convert these into merchant ships.

Interned German torpedo boats handed over to Belgium according to the Dutch newspaper De Telegraaf dated 26 June 1919

An item dated Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands 25th reported that the German torpedo boats interned at Hellevoetsluis were to be handed over to Belgium. A day earlier arrived a nay officer and a army officer and on the 25th 6 tugs which we to be towed towards Antwerp, Belgium. The German crews replaced by the crews of the tugs would depart next day.

Saturday, 25 June 2016

Russian light cruiser Korniloff in 1923

Being built, displacement 7.600 tons, horsepower 55.000 hp, coal-oil fuelled turbine direct drive machinery and an armament of 15-5.1” guns, 18 smaller and machineguns, 2 submerged torpedo tubes and 100 mines.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

Russian light cruiser Svetlana (1915) in 1923

Launched in 1915, completed in 1923, displacement 6.800 tons, horsepower 50.000 hp, coal-oil fuelled turbine direct drive machinery and an armament of 15-5.1” guns, 18 smaller and machineguns, 2 submerged torpedo tubes and 100 mines.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

German general cargo ship Regine 2009-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 17 June 2016

Antigua&Barbuda-flagged, homeport Saint John’s, IMO 9393242, MMSI 305984000 and call sign V2GL7. Built by JJ Sietas Schiffswerft, Hamburg, Germany in 2009. Owned and managed by SAL Heavy Lift, Hamburg, Germany.

German container ship (ex-Canmar Spirit 2003-2005, CP Spirit 2005-2006) Montreal Express 2006-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 17 June 2016

Bermuda-flagged, IMO 9253741, MMSI 310750000 and call sign MAHG5. Built by Daewoo Shipbuilding&Marine Engineering, Geoje, South Korea in 2003. According to maritime-connector United Kingdom-flagged, homeport London. Owned by Hapag Lloyd, Hamburg, Germany and owned by Anglo Eastern Shipmanagement, Hong Kong, China. Ex-Canmar Spirit renamed July 2005 and CP Spirit renamed May 2006.

Cypriot reefer (ex-Australian Reefer 1984-2000, Rauma Reefer 2000-2006) Ice Runner 2006-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 17 June 2016

Marshall Islands-flagged, IMO 8311120, MMSI 538004732 and call sign V7YT8. . Built by Hyundai Heavy Industries, Ulsan, South Korea in 1984. Owned and managed by Maestro Shipmanagement, Limassol, Cyprus. Ex-Australian Reefer renamed November 2000 and Rauma Reefer renamed June 2006.

German container ship (ex-CPO Baltimore 2009) Cap Harrison 2009-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 17 June 2016

Liberia-flagged, homeport Monrovia, Liberia, IMO 9440796, MMSI 636091990 and call sign A8VD9. Built by Hyundai Heavy Industries, Ulsan, South Korea in 2009. Ex-CPO Baltimore renamed April 2009. Owned and managed by Offen Reederei, Hamburg, Germany

Russian light cruiser Istomin in 1923

Being built, displacement 7.600 tons, horsepower 55.000 hp, coal-oil fuelled turbine direct drive machinery and an armament of 15-5.1” guns, 18 smaller and machineguns, 2 submerged torpedo tubes and 100 mines.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

Russian light cruiser Admiral Spiridov in 1923

Displacement 6.800 tons, horsepower 50.000 hp, coal-oil fuelled turbine direct drive machinery and an armament of 15-5.1” guns, 18 smaller and machineguns, 2 submerged torpedo tubes and 100 mines.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

Russian light cruiser Admiral Butakov in 1923

Displacement 6.800 tons, horsepower 50.000 hp, coal-oil fuelled turbine direct drive machinery and an armament of 15-5.1” guns, 18 smaller and machineguns, 2 submerged torpedo tubes and 100 mines.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

Russian light cruiser Admiral Greig (1916) in 1923

Launched in 1916, completed in 1923, displacement 6.800 tons, horsepower 50.000 hp, coal-oil fuelled turbine direct drive machinery and an armament of 15-5.1” guns, 18 smaller and machineguns, 2 submerged torpedo tubes and 100 mines.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

German oil/chemical tanker (ex-Rio Dawson 2009) Cape Dawson 2009-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 16 June 2016

Marshall Islands-flagged, IMO 9449429, MMSI 538090401 and call sign V7SU5. Ex-Rio Dawson renamed November 2009. Owned and managed by Columbia Shipmanahgement Deutschland, Hamburg, Germany. Built by STX Offshore&Shipbuilding, Inhae, South Korea in 2009.

Greek bulk carrier (ex-Saffron 2004-2011) Chios Trinity 2011-


Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 18 June 2016

Panama-flagged, IMO 9279379, MMSI 356194000 and call sign HPWD. Ex-Saffron renamed March 2011. Built by Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Kobe, Japan in 2004. Owned and managed by Harbor Shipping&Trading, Athens, Greece.

American passengers ship Marina 2011-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 17 June 2016

Marshall Islands-flagged, homeport Majuro, IMO 9438066, MMSI 538003668 and call sign V7SK2. Built by Fincantieri Sestri, Genova, Italy in 2011. Owned by Oceania Cruises, Doral, Florida, USA and managed by Prestige Cruise Services, Doral, Florida, USA.