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Tuesday, 24 May 2022

Nordic sails - History & development of working sail in North & Northwest-Europe


The intention behind creation of this book was to present the reader with a broad outline of the history and development of working sail in Northern and North-western Europe. The vessels depicted represent hundreds of years of evolution in merchant and fishing ship design and construction. Although many tend to believe that the "age of sail" is long gone and destined never to return, it has in fact never faded completely away, merely decreased in presence and, remarkably enough, some of the technologies and inventions of the past are now revealing their potential to become more important in the future.

 


Throughout human history, ship propulsion has become more and more advanced. In the earliest days it was provided mostly by paddles/oars, followed by sails. Only after the Industrial Revolution did things start to change more and ship propulsion became increasingly diverse over the years that followed, first with the introduction of steam engines, followed by steam turbines, gasoline and diesel engines, electrical motors, nuclear power and even hydrogen-fueled systems, but the development of wind-based methods never stopped. Sailing merchant ships are making a quite unexpected comeback, and their numbers are increasing. These days the family of commercially active sailing ships is becoming more diverse once again, as the vessels carrying 'classic' canvas sails are being joined by ones carrying the so-called mechanical sails, such as rotor sails, dyna sails, wing sails, wind turbines and various other wind powered mechanisms.

 


The 1973 oil crisis gave birth to many initiatives towards sailing cargo ship revival, but few of them actually came to fruition. Some examples from this "forgotten decade" of ship design are included here, to an extent permitted by the size constraints of this publication and an unfortunate limitation stemming from a limited source base for these often extremely imaginative projects. Yet, many engineers dared to take the challenge of pushing the bounds of sail technology to wholly new levels and they will all be honoured in this publication as a result

The focus is on ships built (or intended to be built) in countries located in Northern & North-western Europe, as well as those vessels built elsewhere but for clients from the aforementioned areas. As mentioned, obvious practical considerations allowed us to present only a limited selection from an immense multitude of ships that potentially could be included, and some tough choices had to be made in order to find a proper balance between the various categories of vessels while keeping this publishing project manageable. The categories of all kinds of sailing merchant and fishing ships were eligible to be included in this book, on the condition that they were originally built for these purposes, even if not necessarily "sailing" ships from the start, merely converted from motor vessels at some point in their service lives:

Each ship has been presented in a number of detailed technical drawings depicting them during key moments of their history, and supported by detailed write-ups of the ship's service record, technical specifications and sail plans. Starting with their original appearance, followed by the modifications made, changes of ownership, changes in purpose and in some cases their change back to a nearly original state.

Countries that will be represented: Åland, Belgium, Denmark, Estonia, Faroe Islands, France , Germany, Ireland, Iceland, Latvia, Lithuania, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Russia/Soviet Union, Sweden, United Kingdom.

Belgian pilot boat Wulpen 2019-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 25 March 2022

Belgium-flagged, IMO 9852353, MMSI 295758000 and call sign OCRL. Built by Baltic Workboats AS, Saare, Estonia in 2019. Sister ship Schooneveld.

American whaler Erie visited Lahaina, Hawaii according to the newspaper The Polynesian dated 29 March 1851

 The New Pictorial and Illustrated Family Magazine established for the diffusion of useful knowledge, vol. III. Robert Sears editor, New York 1846

An item reported the arrival at Lahaina, Hawaii on 18 March of the American whaler Erie master Blackmer 5½ months out 80 barrels whale oil 700 lbs bone.

American whaler Gideon Howland visited Lahaina, Hawaii according to the newspaper The Polynesian dated 29 March 1851

An item reported the arrival at Lahaina, Hawaii on 15 March of the American whaler Gideon Howland master Jermegan of New Bedford 6 months out 220 barrels sperm oil.

French whaler Le Tour du pin visited Lahaina, Hawaii according to the newspaper The Polynesian dated 29 March 1851

 The New Pictorial and Illustrated Family Magazine established for the diffusion of useful knowledge, vol. III. Robert Sears editor, New York 1846

An item reported the arrival at Lahaina, Hawaii on 28 February of the French whaler Le Tour du pin of Le Havre, France 9 months out 200 barrels whale oil 300lbs bone.

Dutch pilot boat Mira 2020-


Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 25 March 2022

Netherlands-flagged, MMSI 244407000 and call sign PDSA. Built by Next Generation Shipyards, Lauwersoog, Netherlands in 2020. Of Loodswezen [pilotage service] at Hoek van Holland. 

British whaler Coquette active in 1829 according to the newspaper The Sydney Monitor dated Saturday 27 March 1830

An item reported the British whaler Coquette 450 tons active in the sperm whaling on 5 January 1829.

British whaler Emma active in 1829 according to the newspaper The Sydney Monitor dated Saturday 27 March 1830

An item reported the British whaler Emma 466 tons active in the sperm whaling on 5 January 1829.

British whaler Ratcliff active in 1829 according to the newspaper The Sydney Monitor dated Saturday 27 March 1830

An item reported the British whaler Ratcliff 305 tons active in the sperm whaling on 5 January 1829. 

Dutch pilot boat Zeemeeuw 1970-


Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 25 March 2022

Netherlands-flagged, IMO 8434128, MMSI 244769000 and call sign PIWX. Built by Le Comte Holland, Vianen, Netherlands in 1970.

Worse catch results for Greenland seal hunting according tot he Dutch newspaper Noordhollandsche courant dated 4 July 1781

An item reported the arrival at Bergen, Norway of a seal hunter returning from Greenland with 40 barrels seal blubber reporting that the catch results of the seal hunting were very worse.

Most of Davis Strait whalers and Greenland seal hunters left Hamburg, Germany to hunting fields according to the Dutch newspaper Rotterdamse courant dated 20 March 1770

An item reported the departure on the 6th from the river Elbe 4 Davis Strait whalers of Hamburg followed on 10 and 11 March by the Greenland seal hunters except for 3 ships.

German container ship (ex-Vega Mercury 2009) Sag Good Timing 2009-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 25 February 2022

Marshall Islands-flagged, homeport Majuro, IMO 9403463, MMSI 538090602 and call sign V7A4896. Built by Kouan Shipbuilding, Taizhou Jiangsu, China in 2009. Owned and managed by Vega Reederei, Hamburg, Germany. Earlier Liberia-flagged, homeport Monrovia and call sign A8PT9.

German Greenland seal hunter P. Michels returned home according to the Dutch newspaper Rotterdamse courant dated 4 June 1772

An item dated Hamburg, Germany 29 May reported the arrival of commandeur Lammers with a list of catch results of the German Greenland seal hunter P. Michels of Hamburg 41 quardelen seal blubber.(1)

Note

1. The Vrouw Agata, owner Johann A. Willink&Co. Wanda Oesau, Hamburgs Grönlandfahrt auf Walfischfang und Robbenschlag vom 17.-19. Jahrhundert, 1955.

German Greenland seal hunter P.A. Leest returned home according to the Dutch newspaper Rotterdamse courant dated 4 June 1772

An item dated Hamburg, Germany 29 May reported the arrival of commandeur Lammers with a list of catch results of the German Greenland seal hunter P.A. Leest of Hamburg 130 quardelen seal blubber.(1)

Note

1. The 2 j. Hermans, owner Johann A. Willink&Co. Wanda Oesau, Hamburgs Grönlandfahrt auf Walfischfang und Robbenschlag vom 17.-19. Jahrhundert, 1955

German Greenland seal hunter J. Swen returned home according to the Dutch newspaper Rotterdamse courant dated 4 June 1772

An item dated Hamburg, Germany 29 May reported the arrival of commandeur Lammers with a list of catch results of the German Greenland seal hunter J. Swen of Hamburg 140 quardelen seal blubber .(1)

Note

1. J. Zween, the Bloyende Hoop owned by Johann A. Willink&Co. Wanda Oesau, Hamburgs Grönlandfahrt auf Walfischfang und Robbenschlag vom 17.-19. Jahrhundert, 1955.

Monday, 23 May 2022

Australian training ship (ex-Australian Trader 1969-1977) HMAS Jervis Bay (GT 203) 1977-1995 (Agios Andreas 1995-2003, Ajman Leader 2003-2004, Ajman City 2004)

Sutherland Dock, Cockatoo Island Dockyard, Australia 9 August 1980

Photographer Rob Rouse with our thanks for allowing us to publish

Laid down by State Dockyard, Newcastle, Australia on 18 August 1967, launched on 17 February 1969, acquired by the Royal Australian Navy on 28 January 1977, commissioned on 25 August, decommissioned on 18 April 1994, sold tot he Liberian company Voyager Marine, homeport Kingstown, Saint Vincent on 23 December 1984 and became a ferry between Greece and Turkey, sold to Marwan Shipping and Trading of Comoros in November 2003, since February 2004 of Marwan Shipping and Trading, Sjarjah, United Arab States, Jordan-flagged and finally sold to be broken up at Alang India in September 2004. IMO 6910427.  Gross tonnage 7,005-11,109 (after 1995) tons, deadweight3,250 tons, displacement 8,915 tons and as dimensions 135,6 x 21,5 x 6,09 metres or 445 x 71 x 20.0 feet, Speed 19,5 knots. In naval service numbered her crew 14 officers, 163 sailors and maximum 76 trainers. Armament consisted of just small arms and she had a strengthened flight deck for a Westland Sea King helicopter. Roll-on/roll off carrier

Russian transport annex training ship Okean visited the Dutch East Indies in December 1903

Appearance as the planned aircraft carrier Komsomolets


The Dutch newspaper Soerabijasch handelsblad dated 11 December 1903 reporting the arrival of the Russian transport annex training ship Ocean at Sabang for coal and fresh water. De locomotief dated 11 December confirmed in an item dated Sabang 10 December this arrival. The edition dated 9 September 1903 referred to her (now called Okean) visiting Colombo, Ceylon. A correspondent of the Times of Ceylon went on board and wondered afterwards that almost none of the officers spoke English while at the contrary most of them spoke French fluently and German quite well.

Note

1. Part of the Baltic Fleet, built by Howaldtswerke, Kiel, Germany between 1901-1902 especially for training naval engineers, for this purpose fitted out with a range of several types of boilers, renamed Komsomolets on 15 October 1922 and PKZ-72 on 20 November 1956. Was as Komsomolets in 1927 to be converted into an aircraft carrier resembling the British HMS Hermes.

Italian cruiser Calabria visited the Dutch East Indies in December 1903

The Jaarboek van de Koninklijke Nederlandsche Zeemacht 1903-1904 reported that the Italian cruiser Calabria visited in the Dutch East Indies the harbours Oleh-leh and Sabang on 7 December 1903. The Dutch newspaper Soerabijasch handelsblad dated 11 December 1903 reporting her arrival at Sabang for coal and fresh water. The Bataviaasch nieuwsblad dated 10 February 1904 reported her arrival on 6 February 1904 at Oeleh Lheue wtih a tombstone for the in September 1903 died petty officer.(1)

Note

1.  Protected cruiser laid down at la Spezia, Italy in February 1892, launched on 20 September 1894, commissioned on 12 July 1897, reclassified as gunboat in 1921, gunners training ship in 1924 and sold to be broken up on 13 November 1924. Designed to serve in the Italian overseas empire.

French protected cruiser d’Assas visited the Dutch East Indies in April-May 1904



The Jaarboek van de Koninklijke Nederlandsche Zeemacht 1903-1904 reported that the French cruiser d’Assas visited Sabang, Dutch East Indies between 19 April-1 May 1904. The Dutch newspaper locomotief dated 6 May 1904 reported that on Sunday afternoon 4 French destroyers arrived at Sabang followed on Tuesday 19 April by the d’Assas. The destroyers departed after loading coal and water directly for Saigon leaving the cruiser behind. She had to undergo repairs by the Sabangmaatschappij.

Note

1. Part of the D’Assas-class protected cruisers, preceded by Descartes-class, succeeded by Catinat-class, laid down by Ateliers en Chantiers de la Lore, Saint-Nazaire, France in 1894, launched on 28 March 1896, completed in March 1898 and stricken and sold to be up in 1914

Belgian frigate (former Dutch Karel Doorman 1985-2006) BNS Leopold I (F930) 2005-



Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 23 May 2022

Belgium-flagged, MMSI 205203000 and call sign ORJP. Prededed by Kortenaer and Roofdier-classes, Laid at the shipyard Kon.Mij. De Schelde, Vlissingen, Netherlands as the Dutch multi purpose frigate Karel Doorman (F827) with yard number 364 on 26 February 1985, launched on 20 April 1988, commissioned on 31 May 1991, sold to Belgium on 22 December 2005, decommissioned in the Royal Netherlands Navy in 2006 and handed over to Belgium on 29 March 2007. Based at Zeebrugge, Belgium. General specifications of the Dutch Karel Doorman-class frigates are a displacement of 2.800 tonnes and as dimensions 122,325 x 14,37 x 6,2 metres or 40.3 x 47.1 x 20 feet. With a speed of 30 knots


Spanish Ostend privateer St. Catharina-Ste. Catherine 1693

Captain Michiel Mansvelt. Departed Ostend 6 May 1693, returned at Ostend 19 June 1693. Snow.

Source

The Belgian Shiplover No. 80, March-April 1961, Shipslist 148. O. Lemaître. Liste des Corsaires Ostendais.

Spanish Ostend privateer St. Pijetter-St. Pierre 1693

Captain Pieter de Wijmmeer. Departed Ostend 20 April 1693, returned at Ostend 0 May 1693. Snow, fitted out as warship.

Source

The Belgian Shiplover No. 80, March-April 1961, Shipslist 148. O. Lemaître. Liste des Corsaires Ostendais.

Danish row gunboat/skjaerbat Scharven 1702-1740

Built at Christiansand in 1702, last mentioned, dimensions 50 (prow) x 11.3 x 3.6 feet, an armament of 4-5 guns and a crew numbering 22+36 men. The No. 4.

Sources

H.G. Garde. Efterretninger om den dankse of norske seemagt. Copenhagen, 1835.

B.E. Thomsen. “Danish Oared gunboat 1700-1850”, magazine Marineshistorisk Tideskrift November 1977.

Belgian minehunter Narcis (M923) 1990-

Schelde offf Vlissingen, Netherlands 23 May 2022

Belgium-flagged, MMSI 205211000 and call sign ORGN. Of the Tripartite-class. Laid down by Mercantile-Belyard Shipyard, Rupelmonde, Belgium on 30 March 1990, launched on 27 September 1990, christened on 14 March 1991 and commissioned on 30 March 1991.

Danish gun chaloupe No.5 1852-1871

Built by E. Dreyer in 1852, sold in 1867, length 74.9 feet.

Source

A. E. Thomsen. “Danish Oared gunboat 1700-1850”, magazine Marineshistorisk Tideskrift November 1977

Danish gun chaloupe No. 4 1852-1871

Built by E. Dreyer in 1852, broken up in 1871, length 74.5 feet.

Source

A. E. Thomsen. “Danish Oared gunboat 1700-1850”, magazine Marineshistorisk Tideskrift November 1977

Danish gun chaloupe No. 2 1852-1871

Built by E. Dreyer in 1852, broken up in 1871, length 74.9 feet.

Source

A. E. Thomsen. “Danish Oared gunboat 1700-1850”, magazine Marineshistorisk Tideskrift November 1977

Greek bulk carrier Seaharmony 2015-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 25 February 2022

Malta-flagged, homeport Valletta, IMO 9688635, MMSI 229902000 and call sign 9HA3703. Registered owner Myrtian Maritime Co., Athens, Greece or owned/managed by Thenamaris, Athens, Greece. Built by Dayang Shipbuilding, Yangzhou, China in 2015. 

American seal hunter Huntress departed to sea in 1820

Of Nantucket, master Burdick, departed in 1820 to the Southern Ocean for seal skins, schooner. 

Source

Catalogue of Nantucket Whalers and their voyages from 1815 to 1870. Hussey&Robinson, Nantucket, 1876.

American seal hunter Diana departed to sea in 1820

Of Nantucket, master Calvin Bunker, departed in 1820 to the Southern Ocean fo seal skins, brig.  

Source

Catalogue of Nantucket Whalers and their voyages from 1815 to 1870. Hussey&Robinson, Nantucket, 1876.

American whaler Galem departed to sea in 1820

Of Nantucket, master Seth Plukham, departed to the Atlantic Ocean and returned on 24 March 1822 100 barrels sperm oil 255 barrels whale oil.

Source

Catalogue of Nantucket Whalers and their voyages from 1815 to 1870. Hussey&Robinson, Nantucket, 1876.

German general cargo ship (ex-Flinterforest 2004-2011, Forest 2011-2019) Silvamar 2019-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 25 February 2022

Cyprus-flagged, homeport Limassol, IMO 9313773, MMSI 209708000 and call sign 5BJA5. Owned and managed by Flinter, Barendrecht, Netherlands in the past, this company went bankrupt in 2016. As Flinterforest owned by CV Scheepvaartonderneming “Flinterforest”. Ex Flinterforest renamed January 2001 and Forest renamed September 2019. Owned by Hermann Lohmann Schiffahrts GmbH&Co. KG MS “Poseidon”, Germany, managed by Hermann Lohmann Schiffahrtsverwalting GmbH, Haren, Germany and chartered by AtoB@C Shipping, Ystad, Sweden. Built by Ferus Smit Scheepswerf, Hoogezand, Netherlands in 2004. 

American steam tug Gotland (1906) in 1910

Net tonnage 8 tons and as dimensions 29 (tonnage length) x 9 feet. Built in 1906. Owner Oscar Peterson, Frankfort, Michigan.

Source

Beeson’s Marine Directory of the northwestern Lakes American and Canadian. Washington, 1910.

American steam tug Golden (1904) in 1910

Net tonnage 9 tons and as dimensions 34 (tonnage length) x 9 feet. Built in 1904. Gas-fuelled. Owner Urbain Gagnon, Two Rivers, Wisconsin.

Source

Beeson’s Marine Directory of the northwestern Lakes American and Canadian. Washington, 1910.

American steam tug Gifford (1901) in 1910

Net tonnage 63 tons and as dimensions 69 (tonnage length) x 20 feet. Built in 1901. Owner Chicago Lumbering Co., Manistiqye, Michigan.

Source

Beeson’s Marine Directory of the northwestern Lakes American and Canadian. Washington, 1910

Sunday, 22 May 2022

British HMS fast patrol vessel Archer (P264) 1985-



Inner harbour Vlissingen, Netherlands 10 May 2022

United Kingdom-flagged, MMSI 232002840 and call sign GAAQ. Launched by Watercraft Limited, Shoreham-by-Sea on 25 June 1985, homeport Leith. Displacement 54 tons and as dimensions 20.8 x 5.8 x 1.8 metres or 68 x 19 x 5.11 feet. Fitted out with 2 Rolls Royce M800T diesels supplying 1,590 bhp via 2 shafts allowing thanks to the hull design a theoretical speed of 45 knots, but limited to the fitted propulsion. Range 550 nautical miles. Crew numbers 5 (operational)-16 (training purposes) men. Armament 1-2cm Oerlikon to be mounted on forecastle and 3 general purpose guns

Italian coastal torpedo boat 62 S 1885-1907

Schichau type 2nd class, original design with one pole mast. Displacement 80 tons and as dimensions 39.00 x 4.80 x 2.15 metres. Crew numbered 16 men including 2 officers. Range 300 nautical miles/15 knots and 1.000 nautical miles/10 knots. Speed 19-22 knots. Horsepower 1.000 hp. One locomotive boiler. Armament 2-35.6cm torpedo tubes and 2-3.7cm guns. Built by Pattison, Naples, Italy. Laid down on 16 November 1885, launched in 1888, commissioned on 3 September 1888 and stricken on 10 March 1907.

Sources

AMM. Paolo M. Pollina. Le Torpediniere Italiane. Officio Storico della Marina Militare. Rome, 1964.

Several editions of Jane’s Fighting Ships

The Naval Annual 1913

http://warshipsresearch.blogspot.com/

Position of German battleship Tirpitz unknown according to the U.S. Joint Intelligence Committee. Daily summary dated 9 March 1942


Admiral Scheer. Source Werft-Reederei-Hafen 15 April 1933

An item reported that the German battleship Tirpitz (1) recently departing from Trondheim, Norway in northern direction did not return and her position was unknown. The pocket battleship Admiral Scheer (2) and a heavy cruiser of the Hipper-class (presumably the Hipper) (3) were still at Trondheim.

Notes

1. Laid down by Kriegsmarinewerft Wilhelmshaven, Germany on 2 November 1936, launched on 1 April 1939, commissioned on 25 February 1941 and sunk by the Royal Air Force on 12 November 1944 at Tromsø, Norway, with her wreck broken up between 1948-1957. Of the Bismarck-class as answer on the French Richelieu-class battleships.

2. Of the Deutschland-class panzerschiffe later classified as heavy cruisers preceded by the Admiral Hipper-class. Main armament 2x3-28cm/11”guns on fore and aft ship one turret. Laid down by Kriegsmarinewerft Wilhelmshaven, Germany on 25 June 1931, launched on 1 April 1933, commissioned on 12 November 1934, sunk during an air attack at Kiel, Germany on 9 April 1945, partly broken up and the remains used of filling up the inner part of the dockyard.

3. Summary dated 12 March suggested the Prinz Eugen.

Source

Map Room Papers (Roosevelt Administration), 1942 - 1945. U.S. Joint Intelligence Committee. Daily summary No. 89 dated 9 March 1942.


Japanese naval forces leaving Rabaul for Salamaua according to the U.S. Joint Intelligence Committee. Daily summary dated 8 March 1942

An item reported that on 6 March Japanese forces were sighted underway from Rabaul, Papua New Guinea towards Salamaua including 3 heavy cruisers and 5 destroyers. At Rabaul were 25 merchant ships, 3 transports and 5 destroyers seen and a day later there 3 cruisers, 4 transports and 1 hospital ship. The J.I.C. commented that Salamaua with her many airfields would serve the Japanese excellent as operations base for eastern New Guinea.

Source

Map Room Papers (Roosevelt Administration), 1942 - 1945. U.S. Joint Intelligence Committee. Daily summary No. 88 dated 8 March 1942.

Belgian crane ship Orion I 2019-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 22 May 2022

Belgium-flagged, homeport Antwerp, Belgium, IMO 9825453, MMSI 205755000 and call sign ORMB. Panama-registered? Owned by the DEME Group. DP3 offshore installation vessel. Built by China Ocean Shipping Co. Ltd. ,in 2019. Sometimes referred to as Orion I.

American submarine patrolling in the Dutch East Indies disappeared according to the U.S. Joint Intelligence Committee. Daily summary dated 8 March 1942

An item reported that an American submarine patrolling in the Dutch East Indies was missing since 7 February.

Source

Map Room Papers (Roosevelt Administration), 1942 - 1945. U.S. Joint Intelligence Committee. Daily summary No. 88 dated 8 March 1942.

Several Japanese submarines active off Australian western coast according to the U.S. Joint Intelligence Committee. Daily summary dated 8 March 1942

An item reported that it could not be proven that there was more than one Japanese submarine active off Fremantle, Australia. The J.I.C. commented that on 7 March was claimed that 5 Japanese submarines were active along the entire Australian western coast.

Source

Map Room Papers (Roosevelt Administration), 1942 - 1945. U.S. Joint Intelligence Committee. Daily summary No. 88 dated 8 March 1942.

American bulk carrier Crested Eagle 2009-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 21 May 2022

Marshall Islands-flagged, IMO 9478626, MMSI 538003477 and call sign V7RC8. Built by IHI Marine United, Tokyo, Japan in 2009. Registered owner Crested Eagle Sg LLC.-owned/managed Eagle Shipping International USA, New York, USA.

Tasmanian whaling barque Wallaby lying at Hobart, Tasmania according to the Colonial Times dated Friday 18 January 1850

An item reported the presence in the harbour of Hobart, Tasmania of the whaling barque Wallaby of 284 tons agent A. Morrison.

Tasmanian whaling barque Sussex lying at Hobart, Tasmania according to the Colonial Times dated Friday 18 January 1850

An item reported the presence in the harbour of Hobart, Tasmania of the whaling barque Sussex of 360 tons agents Seal and Co. 

Tasmanian whaler Pacific lying at Hobart, Tasmania according to the Colonial Times dated Friday 18 January 1850

An item reported the presence in the harbour of Hobart, Tasmania of the whaling ship Pacific of 350 tons agents Seal and Co.

Japanese bulk carrier Ocean Falcon 2011-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 22 May 2022

Panama-flagged, IMO 9595163, MMSI 357656000 and call sign 3FOS6. Registered owner Dawn Shipping SA., Japan, managed by Setouchi Enterprises, Imabari, Japan. Built Hyundai Mipo Dockyard Co. Ltd., Ulsan, South Korea in 2011. 

British whaler Ann active in 1829 according to the newspaper The Sydney Monitor dated Saturday 27 March 1830

An item reported the British whaler Ann 280 tons active in the sperm whaling on 5 January 1829.