Translate

Tuesday, 22 August 2017

Singapore general cargo ship (ex-Ellensborg 2009, SE Pacifica 2009-) Pacifica



Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 18 August 2017

Singapore-flagged, IMO 9431460, MMSI 565227000 and call sign 9V8831. Built by Sanfu Ship Engineering, Taizhou Jiangsu, China in 2009. Owned and managed by SE Shipping Lines, Singapore or owned by Saphir Shipping Pte. Ltd. Ex-Ellensborg renamed November 2009. According to maritime connector called Se Pacifica. According to www.vesselsvalue.com ex-hull 60106 renamed September 2004, ex-Ellensborg renamed October 2006, SE Pacifica renamed December 2009 and ex-Thorco Dragon renamed December 2015. 

German general cargo ship Baltic Merchant 1997-


Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 18 August 2017

Gibraltar-flagged, IMO 9138202, MMSI 236195000 and call sign ZDFP2. Owned and managed by Baltic Forest Line, Stade, Germany. Built by Onega Shipyard, Petrozavodsk, Russia in 1997. 

German container ship (ex-Contship Aurora 2002-2005, CP Aurora 2005-2006, Maersk Dexter 2006-2007) Liverpool Express 2007-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 18 August 2017

Germany-flagged, homeport Hamburg, Germany, IMO 9232565, MMSI 218025000 and call sign DDSD2. Owned and managed by Hapag Lloyd, Hamburg, Germany. Built by Daewoo Shipbuilding&Marine Engineering, Geoje, South Korea in 2002. Ex-Contship Aurora renamed August 2005, CP Aurora renamed March 2006 and Maersk Dexter renamed September 2007. 

Japanese oil/chemical tanker Chemroad Wing 2005-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 18 August 2017

Panama-flagged, IMO 9309502, MMSI 357740000 and call sign 3EAB8. Owned and managed by Info Maine Services, Tokyo, Japan. Built by Kitanihon Shipbuilding, Hachinohe, Japan in 2005. 

Dutch research/survey vessel Fugro Frontier 2014-


Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 18 August 2017

Bahamas-flagged, homeport Nassau, IMO 9701657, MMSI 311000263, offcial number 7000675, and call sign C6BH4. Built by Damen Shipyard Gorinchem, Gorinchem, Netherlands/Galata, Romania with kaartnummer 556068/1272 in December 2014. Owned and managed by Fugro, Leidschendam, Netherlands. 

German general cargo ship (ex-Georg Luhrs 1985-2003) RMS Laar 2003-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 20 August 2017

Antigua&Barbuda-flagged, homeport Saint John;s, IMO 8508400, MMSI 304511000 and call sign V2OB7. Ex-Georg Luhrs renamed April 2003. Built by Peters Schiffswerft, Wewelsfleth, Germany in 1985. Owned and managed by Rhenus Maritime Services, Duisburg, Germany. 

Greek crude oil tanker (ex-LMZ Nefeli 2005-2007) Polyaigos 2007-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 19 August 2017

Greece-flagged, IMO 9306574, MMSI 240681000 and call sign SXVA. Ex-LMZ Nefeli renamed September 2007. Owned and managed by Eletson, Athens, Greece. Built by Daewoo Mangalia Heavy Industries, Mangalia, Romania in 2005. 

Singapore oil/chemical tanker (ex-Meriom Pride 2004-2008) Maersk Kalea 2008-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 19 August 2017

Singapore-flagged, IMO 9256298, MMSI 565814000 and call sign 9VHF3. Ex-Meriom Pride renamed February 2008. Owned by Maersk Tankers Singapore, Singapore and managed by Maersk Tankers, Copenhagen, Denmark. Built by Guangzhou International Shipyard, Guangzhou, China in 2004. 

American bulk carrier (ex-Balboa 2002-2005, Prabhu Jivesh 2005-2013) Bulk Beothuk 2013-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 18 August 2017

Panama-flagged, IMO 9228083, MMSI 355236000 and call sign 3FWZ6. Ex-Balboa renamed January 2005 and Prabhu Jivesh renamed februari 2013. Owned by Phoenix Bulk Carriers, Middletown, RI, USA and managed by Seamar Management, Athens, Greece. Built by Oshima Shipbuilding, Saikai, Japan in 2002. According to maritime connector Marshall Islands-flagged and MMSI 538005017. 

Dutch landing craft L.C.V.P. no. 019 at Balikpapan, Dutch East in February 1947

In 1946 ordered the Dutch supreme commanding officer in the Far East by order no. 62 to investigate the harbours including shipyards in the Dutch East Indies and Netherlands New Guinea. In those so-called Sitraps (Situation reports) was information collected dealing with the available facilities, personnel and vessels/boats. The Dutch East Indies fell in Japanese hands in the Second World War when the Dutch forces surrendered on 8 March 1942 until Japan surrendered on her turn on 15 August 1945. On 17 August 1945 declared nationalistic leaders like Soekarno and Hadda the independence of what was called the Republik Indonesia. The result was a struggle for years before the Netherlands forced by international pressure accepted the Indonesian independence on 29 December 1949.

Condition hull reasonable and of the Gray Marine engine good. Earlier used by the mooring service but at the moment as minesweeper. LCVP=Landing Craft Vehicle Personnel.

Source
Archive Dutch Marinestaf (1942) 1945-1948 inventory number 189, National Archive, The Hague.

Dutch landing craft L.C.V.P. no. 017 at Balikpapan, Dutch East in February 1947

In 1946 ordered the Dutch supreme commanding officer in the Far East by order no. 62 to investigate the harbours including shipyards in the Dutch East Indies and Netherlands New Guinea. In those so-called Sitraps (Situation reports) was information collected dealing with the available facilities, personnel and vessels/boats. The Dutch East Indies fell in Japanese hands in the Second World War when the Dutch forces surrendered on 8 March 1942 until Japan surrendered on her turn on 15 August 1945. On 17 August 1945 declared nationalistic leaders like Soekarno and Hadda the independence of what was called the Republik Indonesia. The result was a struggle for years before the Netherlands forced by international pressure accepted the Indonesian independence on 29 December 1949.

Condition of hull reasonable. Lacking engine. Being repaired. LCVP=Landing Craft Vehicle Personnel.

Source
Archive Dutch Marinestaf (1942) 1945-1948 inventory number 189, National Archive, The Hague. 

Dutch landing craft L.C.V.P. no. 916 at Balikpapan, Dutch East in February 1947

In 1946 ordered the Dutch supreme commanding officer in the Far East by order no. 62 to investigate the harbours including shipyards in the Dutch East Indies and Netherlands New Guinea. In those so-called Sitraps (Situation reports) was information collected dealing with the available facilities, personnel and vessels/boats. The Dutch East Indies fell in Japanese hands in the Second World War when the Dutch forces surrendered on 8 March 1942 until Japan surrendered on her turn on 15 August 1945. On 17 August 1945 declared nationalistic leaders like Soekarno and Hadda the independence of what was called the Republik Indonesia. The result was a struggle for years before the Netherlands forced by international pressure accepted the Indonesian independence on 29 December 1949.

Condition of hull good, engine being revised. Used by the mooring service. LCVP=Landing Craft Vehicle Personnel.

Source
Archive Dutch Marinestaf (1942) 1945-1948 inventory number 189, National Archive, The Hague.

Dutch landing craft L.V.C.P. no. 015 at Balikpapan, Dutch East in February 1947

In 1946 ordered the Dutch supreme commanding officer in the Far East by order no. 62 to investigate the harbours including shipyards in the Dutch East Indies and Netherlands New Guinea. In those so-called Sitraps (Situation reports) was information collected dealing with the available facilities, personnel and vessels/boats. The Dutch East Indies fell in Japanese hands in the Second World War when the Dutch forces surrendered on 8 March 1942 until Japan surrendered on her turn on 15 August 1945. On 17 August 1945 declared nationalistic leaders like Soekarno and Hadda the independence of what was called the Republik Indonesia. The result was a struggle for years before the Netherlands forced by international pressure accepted the Indonesian independence on 29 December 1949.

Condition of the hull good, The Gray Marine engine was to be replaced while her clutch was disable due to her being used as a minesweeper. She was also regularly used by the mooring service. LCVP=Landing Craft Vehicle Personnel.

Source
Archive Dutch Marinestaf (1942) 1945-1948 inventory number 189, National Archive, The Hague.

Dutch landing craft L.C.V.P. no. 014 at Balikpapan, Dutch East in February 1947

In 1946 ordered the Dutch supreme commanding officer in the Far East by order no. 62 to investigate the harbours including shipyards in the Dutch East Indies and Netherlands New Guinea. In those so-called Sitraps (Situation reports) was information collected dealing with the available facilities, personnel and vessels/boats. The Dutch East Indies fell in Japanese hands in the Second World War when the Dutch forces surrendered on 8 March 1942 until Japan surrendered on her turn on 15 August 1945. On 17 August 1945 declared nationalistic leaders like Soekarno and Hadda the independence of what was called the Republik Indonesia. The result was a struggle for years before the Netherlands forced by international pressure accepted the Indonesian independence on 29 December 1949.

Condition of hull and Gray Marine engine good. Was to be sent towards Macassar with as destination Paloppo. LCVP=Landing Craft Vehicle Personnel.

Source
Archive Dutch Marinestaf (1942) 1945-1948 inventory number 189, National Archive, The Hague.

Dutch landing craft L.C.M. no. 018 at Balikpapan, Dutch East in February 1947

In 1946 ordered the Dutch supreme commanding officer in the Far East by order no. 62 to investigate the harbours including shipyards in the Dutch East Indies and Netherlands New Guinea. In those so-called Sitraps (Situation reports) was information collected dealing with the available facilities, personnel and vessels/boats. The Dutch East Indies fell in Japanese hands in the Second World War when the Dutch forces surrendered on 8 March 1942 until Japan surrendered on her turn on 15 August 1945. On 17 August 1945 declared nationalistic leaders like Soekarno and Hadda the independence of what was called the Republik Indonesia. The result was a struggle for years before the Netherlands forced by international pressure accepted the Indonesian independence on 29 December 1949. Condition hull reasonable. The Grey Marine engines were in good condition. Constantly used for special tasks. LCM=Landing Craft Mechanized.

Source
Archive Dutch Marinestaf (1942) 1945-1948 inventory number 189, National Archive, The Hague.

Dutch landing craft L.C.M. no. 012 at Balikpapan, Dutch East in February 1947

In 1946 ordered the Dutch supreme commanding officer in the Far East by order no. 62 to investigate the harbours including shipyards in the Dutch East Indies and Netherlands New Guinea. In those so-called Sitraps (Situation reports) was information collected dealing with the available facilities, personnel and vessels/boats. The Dutch East Indies fell in Japanese hands in the Second World War when the Dutch forces surrendered on 8 March 1942 until Japan surrendered on her turn on 15 August 1945. On 17 August 1945 declared nationalistic leaders like Soekarno and Hadda the independence of what was called the Republik Indonesia. The result was a struggle for years before the Netherlands forced by international pressure accepted the Indonesian independence on 29 December 1949.

Being repaired at Samarinda. Condition of hull and machinery unknown. LCM=Landing Craft Mechanized.

Source
Archive Dutch Marinestaf (1942) 1945-1948 inventory number 189, National Archive, The Hague.

Dutch landing craft L.C.M. no. 011 at Balikpapan, Dutch East in February 1947

In 1946 ordered the Dutch supreme commanding officer in the Far East by order no. 62 to investigate the harbours including shipyards in the Dutch East Indies and Netherlands New Guinea. In those so-called Sitraps (Situation reports) was information collected dealing with the available facilities, personnel and vessels/boats. The Dutch East Indies fell in Japanese hands in the Second World War when the Dutch forces surrendered on 8 March 1942 until Japan surrendered on her turn on 15 August 1945. On 17 August 1945 declared nationalistic leaders like Soekarno and Hadda the independence of what was called the Republik Indonesia. The result was a struggle for years before the Netherlands forced by international pressure accepted the Indonesian independence on 29 December 1949. Lacking engines. Hull useless. Lying half-submerged on the beach near the harbour office. LCM=Landing Craft Mechanized.

Source
Archive Dutch Marinestaf (1942) 1945-1948 inventory number 189, National Archive, The Hague.

Dutch landing craft L.C.M. no. 010 at Balikpapan, Dutch East in February 1947

In 1946 ordered the Dutch supreme commanding officer in the Far East by order no. 62 to investigate the harbours including shipyards in the Dutch East Indies and Netherlands New Guinea. In those so-called Sitraps (Situation reports) was information collected dealing with the available facilities, personnel and vessels/boats. The Dutch East Indies fell in Japanese hands in the Second World War when the Dutch forces surrendered on 8 March 1942 until Japan surrendered on her turn on 15 August 1945. On 17 August 1945 declared nationalistic leaders like Soekarno and Hadda the independence of what was called the Republik Indonesia. The result was a struggle for years before the Netherlands forced by international pressure accepted the Indonesian independence on 29 December 1949.

Hull in worse condition. Lacking engines and now beached to be repaired to be used as lighter for the forestry service. LCM=Landing Craft Mechanized.

Source
Archive Dutch Marinestaf (1942) 1945-1948 inventory number 189, National Archive, The Hague.

Dutch landing craft L.C.M. no. 09 at Balikpapan, Dutch East in February 1947

In 1946 ordered the Dutch supreme commanding officer in the Far East by order no. 62 to investigate the harbours including shipyards in the Dutch East Indies and Netherlands New Guinea. In those so-called Sitraps (Situation reports) was information collected dealing with the available facilities, personnel and vessels/boats. The Dutch East Indies fell in Japanese hands in the Second World War when the Dutch forces surrendered on 8 March 1942 until Japan surrendered on her turn on 15 August 1945. On 17 August 1945 declared nationalistic leaders like Soekarno and Hadda the independence of what was called the Republik Indonesia. The result was a struggle for years before the Netherlands forced by international pressure accepted the Indonesian independence on 29 December 1949.

In reasonable condition. Fitted out with Gray Marine engines and continuously used for special assignments and to maintain the connection with T. Grogot. LCM=Landing Craft Mechanized.

Source
Archive Dutch Marinestaf (1942) 1945-1948 inventory number 189, National Archive, The Hague.

Dutch landing craft L.C.M. no. 8 at Balikpapan, Dutch East in February 1947

In 1946 ordered the Dutch supreme commanding officer in the Far East by order no. 62 to investigate the harbours including shipyards in the Dutch East Indies and Netherlands New Guinea. In those so-called Sitraps (Situation reports) was information collected dealing with the available facilities, personnel and vessels/boats. The Dutch East Indies fell in Japanese hands in the Second World War when the Dutch forces surrendered on 8 March 1942 until Japan surrendered on her turn on 15 August 1945. On 17 August 1945 declared nationalistic leaders like Soekarno and Hadda the independence of what was called the Republik Indonesia. The result was a struggle for years before the Netherlands forced by international pressure accepted the Indonesian independence on 29 December 1949.

In very worse condition. After she was loaded by the K.N.I.L. (Royal Dutch East Indies Army) with ammunition was she stranded. The Dienst van Scheepvaart refloated her but she was heavy leaking with a complete rotten aft ship. The engines were in the workshop for revision. LCM=Landing Craft Mechanized.

Source
Archive Dutch Marinestaf (1942) 1945-1948 inventory number 189, National Archive, The Hague.

Dutch tug T 101 at Balikpapan, Dutch East in February 1947

In 1946 ordered the Dutch supreme commanding officer in the Far East by order no. 62 to investigate the harbours including shipyards in the Dutch East Indies and Netherlands New Guinea. In those so-called Sitraps (Situation reports) was information collected dealing with the available facilities, personnel and vessels/boats. The Dutch East Indies fell in Japanese hands in the Second World War when the Dutch forces surrendered on 8 March 1942 until Japan surrendered on her turn on 15 August 1945. On 17 August 1945 declared nationalistic leaders like Soekarno and Hadda the independence of what was called the Republik Indonesia. The result was a struggle for years before the Netherlands forced by international pressure accepted the Indonesian independence on 29 December 1949.

Repaired and docked at Samarinda and in reasonable condition. Fitted out with steam engine. Used by the forestry service until 31 December 1946 and since 11 February 1947 by the B.P.M. (Bataafsche Petroleum Maatschappij).

Source
Archive Dutch Marinestaf (1942) 1945-1948 inventory number 189, National Archive, The Hague

Dutch tug T 102 at Balikpapan, Dutch East in February 1947

In 1946 ordered the Dutch supreme commanding officer in the Far East by order no. 62 to investigate the harbours including shipyards in the Dutch East Indies and Netherlands New Guinea. In those so-called Sitraps (Situation reports) was information collected dealing with the available facilities, personnel and vessels/boats. The Dutch East Indies fell in Japanese hands in the Second World War when the Dutch forces surrendered on 8 March 1942 until Japan surrendered on her turn on 15 August 1945. On 17 August 1945 declared nationalistic leaders like Soekarno and Hadda the independence of what was called the Republik Indonesia. The result was a struggle for years before the Netherlands forced by international pressure accepted the Indonesian independence on 29 December 1949.

Hull in moderate condition but the diesel engine was in good condition. Constantly used by the forestry service but needed to be docked and repaired on short notice.

Source
Archive Dutch Marinestaf (1942) 1945-1948 inventory number 189, National Archive, The Hague

Monday, 21 August 2017

Italian oil/chemical tanker Electa 2009-

Schelde off Vlissingen-Oost, Netherlands 18 August 2017

Italy-flagged, homeport Bari, Italy, IMO 9416824, MMSI 247284500 and call sign ICBQ. Owned and managed by Morifini, Bari, Italy. Built by Shinasb Yard, Tongyoung, South Korea in 2009. 

Chinese bulk carrier Dynasty Shang 2013-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 17 August 2017

Marshall Islands-flagged, homeport Majuro, IMO 9603087, MMSI 538004496 and call sign V7XJ6. Owned and managed by AHT Shipping, Qingdao, China. Built by Huatai Heavy Industry, Nantong, China in 2013. 

Danish oil/chemical tanker (ex-Kansas 2006-2008) Torm Kansas 2008-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 17 August 2017

Denmark-flagged, homeport Copenhagen Denmark, IMO 9290646, MMSI 229565000 and call sign OYNA2. Ex-Kansas renamed April 2008. Owned and managed by Torm, Hellerup, Denmark. Built by Hyundai Mipo Dockyard, Ulsan, South Korea in 2006. 

American passenger ship Marina 2011-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 16 August 2017

Marshall Islands-flagged, homeport Majuro, IMO 9438066, MMSI 538003668 and call sign V7SK2. Built by Fincantieri Sestri, Genova, Italy in 2011. Owned by Oceania Cruisers, Doral, Florida, USA and managed by Prestige Cruise Services, Doral, Florida, USA. 

Norwegian LPG tanker Clipper Jupiter 2015-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 15 August 2017

Norway-flagged, IMO 9699505, MMSI 257694000 and call sign LATV7. Owned by PR Clipper Jupiter DA, managed by Solvang ASA. Built with yard number 2708 by Hyundai Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., South Korea in 2015. 

French landing platform dock or amphibious ship l’Orage (L9022) 1966-2007 (2017)

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands underway to Ghent, Belgium to be broken up on 20 August 2017

Building authorized on 22 July 1965, laid down at Brest, France in June 1966, launched on 22 April 1967, commissioned in February 1968 and decommissioned in June 2007. Displacement 5.800 tons and as dimensions 144,50 (between perpendiculars)-149 (over all0 x 21.50 x 4,90-8,70 (maximum load) metres. Armament consisted of 6-4cm anti aircraft guns, 2-12cm mortars and landing area sufficient for 4 helicopters. Crew numbered 10 officers, 46 petty officers and 145 men. Assigned to the Pacific Experimental Center. Transport capacity 349-470 (for a short period) military. 

Dutch landing craft LT N-207 at Belawan, Dutch East Indies on 1 August 1946

In 1946 ordered the Dutch supreme commanding officer in the Far East by order no. 62 to investigate the harbours including shipyards in the Dutch East Indies and Netherlands New Guinea. In those so-called Sitraps (Situation reports) was information collected dealing with the available facilities, personnel and vessels/boats. In good condition just like the 2-500hp Gray Marine diesel engines. Not armed.

Source
Archive Dutch Marinestaf (1942) 1945-1948 inventory number 191, National Archive, The Hague. 

Dutch landing craft LT N-208 at Belawan, Dutch East Indies on 1 August 1946

In 1946 ordered the Dutch supreme commanding officer in the Far East by order no. 62 to investigate the harbours including shipyards in the Dutch East Indies and Netherlands New Guinea. In those so-called Sitraps (Situation reports) was information collected dealing with the available facilities, personnel and vessels/boats. In good condition just like the 2-500hp Gray Marine diesel engines. Not armed.

Source
Archive Dutch Marinestaf (1942) 1945-1948 inventory number 191, National Archive, The Hague. 

Dutch lighter K.P.M.-301 at Belawan, Dutch East Indies on 1 August 1946

In 1946 ordered the Dutch supreme commanding officer in the Far East by order no. 62 to investigate the harbours including shipyards in the Dutch East Indies and Netherlands New Guinea. In those so-called Sitraps (Situation reports) was information collected dealing with the available facilities, personnel and vessels/boats. Steel built. In a good condition. None propulsion and armament. KPM probably stands for Koninklijke Paketvaart Maatschappij.

Source
Archive Dutch Marinestaf (1942) 1945-1948 inventory number 191, National Archive, The Hague.

Japanese cargo ship Nankai Maru no. 6 at Belawan, Dutch East Indies on 1 August 1946

In 1946 ordered the Dutch supreme commanding officer in the Far East by order no. 62 to investigate the harbours including shipyards in the Dutch East Indies and Netherlands New Guinea. In those so-called Sitraps (Situation reports) was information collected dealing with the available facilities, personnel and vessels/boats. Wood-built motor cargo ship of around 150 ton. Condition of the hull and the Japanese hot-bulb engines was good.

Source
Archive Dutch Marinestaf (1942) 1945-1948 inventory number 191, National Archive, The Hague.

Japanese mother ship for fishing vessels Akita Maru at Belawan, Dutch East Indies on 1 August 1946

In 1946 ordered the Dutch supreme commanding officer in the Far East by order no. 62 to investigate the harbours including shipyards in the Dutch East Indies and Netherlands New Guinea. In those so-called Sitraps (Situation reports) was information collected dealing with the available facilities, personnel and vessels/boats. Steel-built of around 160 ton. The hull was neglected but the Japanese Airless diesel engine was in good condition.

Source
Archive Dutch Marinestaf (1942) 1945-1948 inventory number 191, National Archive, The Hague. 

Dutch motorboat Senembah at Belawan, Dutch East Indies on 1 August 1946

In 1946 ordered the Dutch supreme commanding officer in the Far East by order no. 62 to investigate the harbours including shipyards in the Dutch East Indies and Netherlands New Guinea. In those so-called Sitraps (Situation reports) was information collected dealing with the available facilities, personnel and vessels/boats. Measured around 15 ton. Both hull and the 4 cylinder diesel engine were in a worse condition. Wood-built. She was unarmed.

Source
Archive Dutch Marinestaf (1942) 1945-1948 inventory number 191, National Archive, The Hague. 

Dutch motorboat A-033 at Belawan, Dutch East Indies on 1 August 1946

In 1946 ordered the Dutch supreme commanding officer in the Far East by order no. 62 to investigate the harbours including shipyards in the Dutch East Indies and Netherlands New Guinea. In those so-called Sitraps (Situation reports) was information collected dealing with the available facilities, personnel and vessels/boats. Both hull and the Kromhout engine were in a worse condition and useless. Steel built.

Source
Archive Dutch Marinestaf (1942) 1945-1948 inventory number 191, National Archive, The Hague. 

Dutch motorboat H-103 at Belawan, Dutch East Indies on 1 August 1946

In 1946 ordered the Dutch supreme commanding officer in the Far East by order no. 62 to investigate the harbours including shipyards in the Dutch East Indies and Netherlands New Guinea. In those so-called Sitraps (Situation reports) was information collected dealing with the available facilities, personnel and vessels/boats. Fitted out with a 4 cylinder Gardner engine. Both hull and engine were in a worse condition and useless. Wood-built.

Source
Archive Dutch Marinestaf (1942) 1945-1948 inventory number 191, National Archive, The Hague. 

Dutch ramped cargo lighter (RCL) N-041 at Belawan, Dutch East Indies on 1 August 1946

In 1946 ordered the Dutch supreme commanding officer in the Far East by order no. 62 to investigate the harbours including shipyards in the Dutch East Indies and Netherlands New Guinea. In those so-called Sitraps (Situation reports) was information collected dealing with the available facilities, personnel and vessels/boats. The machinery consisted of 2-6 clyinder 135 hp Chrysler Marine engines which were in good condition. The bottom was leaking caused by decay by the teredo. She was unarmed.

Source
Archive Dutch Marinestaf (1942) 1945-1948 inventory number 191, National Archive, The Hague. 

Dutch ramped cargo lighter (RCL) N-040 at Belawan, Dutch East Indies on 1 August 1946

In 1946 ordered the Dutch supreme commanding officer in the Far East by order no. 62 to investigate the harbours including shipyards in the Dutch East Indies and Netherlands New Guinea. In those so-called Sitraps (Situation reports) was information collected dealing with the available facilities, personnel and vessels/boats. The machinery consisted of 2-6 cylinder 135 hp Chrysler Marine engines which were in good condition. The bottom was leaking caused by decay by the teredo. She was unarmed.

Source
Archive Dutch Marinestaf (1942) 1945-1948 inventory number 191, National Archive, The Hague.

Dutch pilot boat P-005 at Belawan, Dutch East Indies on 1 August 1946

In 1946 ordered the Dutch supreme commanding officer in the Far East by order no. 62 to investigate the harbours including shipyards in the Dutch East Indies and Netherlands New Guinea. In those so-called Sitraps (Situation reports) was information collected dealing with the available facilities, personnel and vessels/boats. The condition of the boat and her 5 cylinder Carterpillar engine was good. She was unarmed.

Source
Archive Dutch Marinestaf (1942) 1945-1948 inventory number 191, National Archive, The Hague.

Dutch inland tug XT-563 at Belawan, Dutch East Indies on 1 August 1946

In 1946 ordered the Dutch supreme commanding officer in the Far East by order no. 62 to investigate the harbours including shipyards in the Dutch East Indies and Netherlands New Guinea. In those so-called Sitraps (Situation reports) was information collected dealing with the available facilities, personnel and vessels/boats. Condition of the ship was worse. The 50hp compound engine was in quite well condition. She was unarmed.

Source
Archive Dutch Marinestaf (1942) 1945-1948 inventory number 191, National Archive, The Hague. 

Harbour facilities at Belawan, Dutch East Indies on 1 August 1946

In 1946 ordered the Dutch supreme commanding officer in the Far East by order no. 62 to investigate the harbours including shipyards in the Dutch East Indies and Netherlands New Guinea. In those so-called Sitraps (Situation reports) was information collected dealing with the available facilities, personnel and vessels/boats. The Dutch East Indies fell in Japanese hands in the Second World War when the Dutch forces surrendered on 8 March 1942 until Japan surrendered on her turn on 15 August 1945. On 17 August 1945 declared nationalistic leaders like Soekarno and Hadda the independence of what was called the Republik Indonesia. The result was a struggle for years before the Netherlands forced by international pressure accepted the Indonesian independence on 29 December 1949.

The available quay length in the Nieuwe Haven (New Harbour) was 3.100 feet and in good condition. The depth alongside the quay was between 17-21 feet. The quay on the Oude Haven (Old Harbour) was controlled by the Indonesians. The loading and unloading capacity was daily around 500 tons. There were none floating cranes just 2 driving motor cranes with a lift capacity of around 5 ton. The covered goedang capacity was around 100.000 ton. For loading and unloading were Japanese used except for private cargo. That was done by Chinese and British Indies coolies against a daily payment of 2 guilders.

The old government slipway was in good condition but all was manual handled. At the moment she was usable for ships of maximum 30 ton. There were also 4 by the Japanese constructed slipways usable for small barges. The old Government workshop still existed but lacked almost all tools and materials.

Source
Archive Dutch Marinestaf (1942) 1945-1948 inventory number 191, National Archive, The Hague. 

Sunday, 20 August 2017

German general cargo ship (ex-FCC Glory 2006) Glory 2006-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 20 August 2017

Antigua&Barbuda-flagged, homeport Saint John’s, IMO 9378254, MMSI 304902000 and call sign V2BR3. Ex-FCC Glory renamed March 2006. Owned and managed by Candler Schiffahrt, Bremen, Germany. Built by Dongfeng Ship Industry, Chongquing, China in 2006. 

The Bremen cog dated 1380s




German Maritime Museum, Germany August 2017

On 8 October 1962 was in Bremen the wreck of a cog dating from 1380 discovered and between 1962-1965 salvaged. The one-masted square-rigged carvel or clinker-built cog had a tonnage of 90 tons, displacement of 55 tons and as dimensions 23,27 x 7,62 x 4 (hold) metres although the figures are estimated using exhibition notes. There were later three almost dental replicas constructed named Ubena von Bremen, Hansekogge and Roland von Bremen.

Cogs or cog-built vessels are known of existing since the 10th century although becoming popular since the 12th century and built of oak. In first instance it were open ships which also could be rowed but since the 13th century the vessels were decked. In 948 was for the first time a cog mentioned in the Dutch town Muiden probably using the Norwegian trade vessel of the Knarr type developing into a sea going ship even with fore and aft castles for defence or war purposes. Around the 14th century reached the design the limits of further improving and increasing and needed to be replaced by a new designed ship. 

Japanese naval shipbuilding program sufficient according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1937 no. 6

An item referred to the Jap. Chr. dated 17 June 1937 reporting that the Japanese naval command thought that a naval arms race yet had not started and that there were no reasons for increasing the third naval building program which was now executed. 

The Japanese naval budget for 1938 according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1937 no. 6

An item referred to the Jap. Chr. dated 22 July 1938 reporting that the Japanese naval budget 1930 numbered 850.000.000 yen. The naval command desired hegemony in the western pacific and safety in the Far East. 

Japanese officers asked cabinet to eliminate Chinese military strength according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1937 no. 6

An item reported that the board of the Merinkai, an organisation mainly consisting of former army and navy officers with as chairman general Tanaka (1) discussed what was going on in North China. In a statement was the Japanese cabinet urgently asked to stop negotiations with China but instead do anything needed to destroy the Chinese military strength in such a manner that China never would attack Japan again.

Note
1. Shuzuichi Tanaka (1 October 1867 Tatsuno, Hyogo, Japan-24 August 1945 Tokyo, Japan)?

The American submarines stationed at Manila, Philippines as observed by the Dutch submarine personnel in 1926

The Chief of the Dutch naval staff at The Hague, Netherlands after being informed that Dutch submarine officers had contact with the US Navy at Manila, Philippines asked on 12 June 1926 the chef naval staff in the Dutch East Indies for more details if available.(1) From Surabaya, Dutch East Indies was a letter dated 29 July sent confirming the contact between both navies but without requiring information of any importance. Some Dutch officers including the division commanding officer were allowed to go on board of an American submarine. Efforts to get more information about a submerged wireless connection were fruitless. The impression however was that the Dutch submarine service was superior compared with the American submarine service. Seldom was dived with the mother ship the USS Baevar (2) playing a very important roll during the voyages. If the division of 6 submarines left the harbour even for 2 days, the mother ship always went alone. On the other hand was during the building of the American submarines much attention paid on the issue personnel welfare versus accommodation.

Notes
1. In the Dutch East Indies were at that moment 13 Dutch submarines available namely the Hr. Ms. KI-K XIII, launched between 1913-1924, with a displacement varying between 320/380 and670/820 tons. Furthermore the depot ship Hr. Ms. Pelikaan. The Dutch division submarines commanded by lieutenant 1st class J.G. van den Berg consisting of the Hr. Ms. K II, KVII, KVIII and KIX stayed at Manila between 1-8 April for flag representation. Division commanding officer Jacobus Gerardus van den Berg became later commanding officer of the submarine service at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies later at Willemsoord, Netherlands.
2. The USS Beaver (AS-5), submarine tender, built by Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company for account of the Union Pacific Railroad Company in 1910, bought from the San Francisco&Portland Steamship Company on 1 July 1918, commissioned on 1 October 1918, decommissioned on 17 July 1946, stricken on 15 August 1946 and sold to be broken up on 28 August 1950. She arrived on 12 July 1925 with 6 submarines of SubDiv16 and served in the Philippine and Chinese waters until leaving Manila on 1 May 1932.

Source
Archive Dutch naval staff 1886-1942 (National Atchive The Hague) inventory number 291. 

Luxembourg cable layer Isaac Newton 2015-





Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 20 August 2017

Luxembourg, IMO 9707297, MMSI 253134000 and call sign LXND. Gross tonnage 16.255 tons, net tonnage 4.877 tons, deadweight 13.433 tons and as dimensions 120,0 (between perpendiculars)-140,77 (over all)x 34,04 x 7,0 (maximum) x 11,0 (height sides) metres. Bollard pull 100 ton. Built by Uljanik Brodogradiliste/Shipyard, Pula, Croatia in 2015. Owned and managed by Dredging&Maritime Management or Vasco, Luxembourg. Speed 12,5 knots. 

Singapore LNG tanker Norgas Unikum 2011-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 20 August 2017

Singapore-flagged IMO 9468437, MMSI 565465000 and call sign 9V8563. Owned and managed by Norgas Carriers, Singapore. Built by AVIC Dingheng Shipbuilding, Yangzhou, China in 2011. 

German tug (ex-Atlantic Spruce 1995-1997, Felix 1997-2017) Carl 2017-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 20 August 2017

Germany-flagged, IMO 9112739, MMSI 211749880 and call sign DKEY. As the Felix owned by Bugsertjeneste II c/o Ostensjo Rederi AS and managed by Ostensjo Rederi AS, both of Haugesund, Norway, Norway-flag, homeport Haugesund, MMSI 259415000, call sign LIQK and built by East Isle Shipyard, Georgetown, Canada with yard number 62in 1995. Ex-Atlantic Spruce of Atlantic Towing Ltd./J.D. Irving Ltd, Charlottetown renamed August 1997. Gross tonnage 397 tons, net tonnage 110 tons, deadweight 580 tons and as dimensions 30,80 x 11,10 x 3,722 metres. Renamed Carl in 2017 and now owned bt J. Johannsen&Sohn, Luebeck, Germany. 

Dutch inland pusher tug (ex-Panta Rhei 1981-1988, Elmar 198801998, Salvé 1998-2998) Alany 2008-2011 (Arend 2011-)

Merwede off Gorinchem, Netherlands 9 May 2017

Netherlands-flagged, ENI 2316425. Ex-Panta Rhei of P. Hevelman, Krimpen a/d Ijssel, Netherlands, renamed 1988 Elmar of same owner, renamed Salvé in 1998 of D.H.W.J. Rensen, Poortugaal, Netherlands, renamed Alany in 2008 of P. Hoefnagel, Tollebeek, Netherlands and Arend in 2011 of Adelaar Duwvaart BV, Rotterdam, Netherlands. Built by van Gelder, Gorinchem, Netherlands with yard number 8614 in 1980. 

Swiss inland tanker (ex-Campania 2000-2005) Piz K2 2005-2014) K2 2014-)

Merwede off Gorinchem, Netherlands 9 May 2017

ENI 2324587. Built by Centromost Stocznia Rzeczna, Plock, Poland and completed by Joh. Van Duijvendijk BV, Krimpen a/d Ijssel, Netherlands in 2000. Ex-Campania of Vopak Berging Europe BV, Rotterdam, Netherlands, since 2005 Piz K2 of Fluvia AG, Basel, Switzerland and since 2014 renamed K2 of Fluvia AG or Interstream Barging Vegoil AG, Zug, Switzerland, Switzerland-flagged, ENI 07001827, MMSI 269057228 and call sign HE7228. 

Belgian inland tanker Tarsis 2004-

Merwede off Gorinchem, Netherlands 9 May 2017

Belgium-flagged, ENI 06004050, MMSI 205442290 and call sign OT4422. Built by Giurgiu Shipyard, Giurgiu, Romania and completed by Asto, Raamsdonksveer, Netherlands for account of R, Verdoodt, Schoten, Belgium in 2004. 

German inland cargo ship Esslingen 1988-2015 (Stellenbosch 2015-)

Merwede off Gorinchem, Netherlands 9 May 2017

Germany-flagged, EU 5501900. Built by Arminiuswerft, Bodenwerder, Germany with yard number 10506 in 1988 for account of Dettmer&Co. reederei GmbH, Bremen, Germany and renamed Stellenbosch in 2015 of Imperial Shipping Group, Duisburg-Ruhrort, Germany. 

German inland tanker (ex-Va-Banque 1993-2004, Franken 2004-2006) Main-Spessart 2006-

Merwede off Gorinchem, Netherlands 9 May 2017

Germany-flagged, ENI 04801410, MMSI 211535300 and call sign DC9855. Ex-Va-Banque of Vof. Va-Banque, Nieuwegein, Netherlands, renamed Franken of Stahl Schiffahrt, Schollbrunn, Germany in 2004 and renamed Main-Spessart of Gebr. Stahl, Aschaffenburg, Germany in 2006. Built by Neue Oderwerft, Eisenhüttenstadt, Germany and completed by Dolderman, Dordrecht, Netherlands in 1993. 

Dutch inland tanker (ex-Dordrecht 27 1975-1993, Dordrecht 37 1993-2000, Vopak. Celsius 2000-2008) Celsius 2008-

Merwede off Gorinchem, Netherlands 9 May 2017

Netherlands-flagged, IMO 7383839, ENI 02314364, MMSI 244660301 and call sihn PH4976. Ex-Dordrecht 27 of Gebr. Broere BV, Dordrecht, Netherlands, renamed Dordrecht 37 of Gebr. Broer BV in 1993, renamed in 2000 Vopak. Celsius of Frisia BV, Dordrecht, since 2006 of R. Otter, Heerenveen who renamed her Celsius in 2008. 

Dutch inland tanker Blizzard 1983-

Merwede off Gorinchem, Netherlands 9 May 2017

Netherlands-flagged, EU/ENI 2316967, MMSI 244660413 and call sign PH8343. Built by De Kaap, Meppel, Netherlands for account of Chemgas BV, Rotterdam, Netherlands with yard number 199 in 1983. Since 2003 of Chemgas Shipping BV, Rotterdam. 

British Dido-class cruisers also responsible for the air defence of the fleet according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1937 no. 6

An item referred to the magazine U.S.R. dated 24 June 1937 reporting that of the main tasks of the cruisers of the Dido-class was to be responsible for the air defence of the fleet.(1)

Note
1 Of the Dido-class, preceded by the Town-class and succeeded by the Crown Colony-class, totally were 16 built. The design armament consisted of 5x2-13,3cm/5.25” quick firing guns, 2x4-12,7mm/0.5” Vickers machine guns, 24x-4cm/2pd quick firing guns pom-poms and 2x3-53,3cm/21” torpedo tubes. 

Japanese cruiser Ashigara visited Berlin, Germany according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1937 no. 6

An item reported that the commanding officer of the Japanese cruiser Ashigara (10 rear admiral Kobayashi (2) was very impressed during his visit at Berlin, Germany of the German progress. He stated after his return in Japan tow witness his enthusiasm for the Japanese people and the naval command

Notes
1. Heavy cruiser of the Myoko-class, laid down by Kawasaki Shipyards, Kobe, Japan on 11 April 1925, launched on 2 April 1928, commissioned on 20 August 1929 and sunk by the British submarine HMS Trenchant on 8 June 1945 while used to transport troops in the Bangka Strait.
2. Sonosuke Koboyashi (2 October 1886-17 March 1975). 

Japanese firm exploiting iron mines on French New Caledonia according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1937 no. 6

An item referred to the magazine Jap.Chr. dated 19 August 1937 reported that the Japan Steel Pipe Company was allowed by the government of French New Caledonia to establish a firm to exploit the ore mines eat that moment French property. The estimated capacity was 20 million tons of ore of 50-60% purity. 

Japanese Trocal shells fishery along coasts of French New Caledonia according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1937 no. 6

An item referred to the le Yacht dated 10 July 1937 reporting that Japanese fishermen now were involved in the Troca shells fishery along the coasts of French New Caledonia. Already was one32 tons  motor boat seized after breaking the fishery rules. 

Saturday, 19 August 2017

Russian coastal defence ship General Admiral Graf Apraksin 1894-1905 and Japanese coastal defence ship 2nd class Okinoshima 1905-1939


Laid down by New Admiralty Works, St. Petersburg, Russia on 24 October 1894, launched on 12 May 1896, commissioned in 1899, captured by Japan on 28 May 1905, commissioned in Japanese navy as Okinoshima on 6 June 1905, decommissioned and reclassified as submarine tender on 1 April 1922 and broken up in September 1939.

Of the Admiral Ushakov-class consisting of the Admiral Ushakov, General Admiral Apraksin and Admiral Senyavin, preceded by the Gangut which was a smaller version of the Imperator Aleksandr II-class battleships. Displacement 4.232 (normal)-4.339 (maximum) tons and as dimensions 84,6 (waterline) x 15,88 x 5,49 metres or 277.7 x 52.1 x 18.0 feet. The machinery consisted of 2 shaft vertical triple expansion steam engines and 8 boilers supplying 5.250 shp allowing a speed of 16 knots. With a speed of 10 knots and the coal bunker capacity was the range 3.000 nautical miles. Her crew numbered 406 men. Original armament consisted of 1x2&1x1-24,5cm/10” guns, 4x1-12.7cm/4.7” guns, 10-4,7cm/1.9” guns, 12-3,7cm/1.5” guns and 4-45cm/18” torpedo tubes and in Japanese service 3-25,4cm/10” guns, 6-15,2cm/6” guns and 2-4,7cm/1.9” Hotchkiss guns. The armament consisted of a 25cm/9.8” thick belt, 7,5cm/3” thick deck and 20cm/7.9” for the turrets. 

Russian coastal defence ship Admiral Senyavin 1892-1905 and Japanese coastal defence ship 2nd class Mishima 1905-1936


Laid down by Baltic Works, St. Petersburg, Russia on 2 August 1892, launched on 22 August 1894, commissioned in 1896, captured on 28 May 1905, commissioned in the Japanese navy as Mishima on 6 June 1905, reclassified as submarine tender on 1 April 1921, stricken on 10 October 1935 and sunk while used as a target off Kushima, Miyazaki in September 1936.

Of the Admiral Ushakov-class consisting of the Admiral Ushakov, General Admiral Apraksin and Admiral Senyavin, preceded by the Gangut which was a smaller version of the Imperator Aleksandr II-class battleships. Displacement 4.232 (normal)-4.339 (maximum) tons and as dimensions 84,6 (waterline) x 15,88 x 5,49 metres or 277.7 x 52.1 x 18.0 feet. The machinery consisted of 2 shaft vertical triple expansion steam engines and 8 boilers supplying 5.250 shp allowing a speed of 16 knots. With a speed of 10 knots and the coal bunker capacity was the range 3.000 nautical miles. Her crew numbered 406 men. Original armament consisted of 2x2-24,5cm/10” guns, 4x1-12.7cm/4.7” guns, 10-4,7cm/1.9” guns, 12-3,7cm/1.5” guns and 4-45cm/18” torpedo tubes and in Japanese service 4-25,4cm/10” guns, 6-15,2cm/6” guns and 2-4,7cm/1.9” Hotchkiss guns. The armament consisted of a 25cm/9.8” thick belt, 7,5cm/3” thick deck and 20cm/7.9” for the turrets. . 

Russian battleship Poltava 1892-1905 and Japanese Tango 1905-1916 and Russian Chesma 1916-1924

Russian Imperator Nikolai I as the Japanese Iki

Russian Poltava as Japanese Tango

Laid down at the New Admiralty Shipyard, St. Petersburg, Russia on 19 May 1892, launched on 6 November 1894, commissioned in 1899, sunk after hits by Japanese gunfire on 5 December 1904, captured by the Japanese forces at Port Arthur in January 1905, refloated in July 1905, renamed Tango and commissioned in the Japanese navy on 22 August 1905, reclassified as 1st class coast defence ship in 1916, sold back to Russia on ¾ April 1916, renamed Chesma, in hands of the Bolsheviks in October 1917, captured by British forces in March 1919, recaptured by Soviet forces and stricken on 3 July 1924.

Of the Petropavlovsk-class consisting of the Poltava, Sevastopol and Petropavlovsk, preceded by the Imperator Aleksandr II-class and succeeded by the Tri Sviatitelia. Displacement 11.140 9design)-11.685 tons and as dimensions 114,6 (over all) x 21,3 c 8,6 metres or 376 x 70 x 28 feet. The machinery consisted of 14 cylindrical fire-tube boilers and 2 vertical triple expansion engines delivering via 2 shafts 10.600 ihp allowing a speed of 16 knots and with a speed of 10 knots a range of 3.750 nautical miles. Her crew numbered 631-652 men in Russian service and 668 in Japanese service. The Krupp armour consisted of a 25,4cm/10”-36,8cm/14.5” thick waterline belt, a 6,1cm/2”-7,6cm/3” thick deck with the main turrets, secondary turrets and conning tower protected by respectively 24,5cm/10”, 12,7cm/12” and 22,9cm/9”. Originally consisted the armament of 2x2-30,5cm/12” guns, 2x2&4x1-15,2cm/6’ guns, 12x1-4,7cm/1.9” guns, 28x1-3,7cm/1.5” guns, 4-38,1cm/15” surfaced torpedo tubes and 2-45,7c,/18” submerged torpedo tubes. In Japanese service was the armament changed into 2-12” guns, 10-6” guns, 10x1-12pd quick firing guns, 4-18” surfaced torpedo tubes and 50 mines. 

Dutch ocean going minesweeper Hr. Ms. Onverschrokken (1952-1970) and torpedo work ship Mercuur (A856) 1970-1987




Docked at Vlissingen-Oost, Netherlands 18 August 2017

Laid down at the shipyard of the Peterson Builders Incorporation, Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin, USA on 19 February 1952, launched on 17 January 1953 and commissioned on 22 July 1953 as Hr. Ms. Onverschrokken (M886). She and her sister ships were built in the USA and handed over to the Netherlands according to the Mutual Defense Assistance Program. Since 1 January 1969 classified as headquarters-support ship for minesweepers squadrons.

Since 1970 was she no longer used as a minesweeper and was in 1972 rebuilt as a torpedo work ship and at the same time renamed Mercuur. All torpedo works ships serving in the Royal Netherlands Navy since the 1880’s are named Mercuur. She assisted at torpedo launching tests executed by submarines by afterwards picking up the torpedo and taken at board preparing for the next test launching. Further more served she as target during torpedo tests. In 1987 replaced by the Mercuur (A900) built by Damen Schelde Naval Shipbuilding. Temporarily handed over to the Stichting Nautisch Kwartier Amsterdam, however given back to the Royal Netherlands Navy after some time. Then handed over to the Stichting Behoud Maritieme Monumenten and became a museum ship since 1992 at Scheveningen, Netherlands until December 2015 when she was towed back to Den Helder, Netherlands after she was given back to the Royal Netherlands Navy on 15 December. Her final fate was to be broken up there. The Stichting Maritiem Erfgoed Vlissingen succeeded in 2016 to persuade the Royal Netherlands Navy to save her for the time necessary to develop a business-plan as museum ship. On Saturday 16 December 2016 arrived the partly stripped  in Vlissingen-Oost. There is the asbestos to be removed and started with the maintenance and conversion again into a museum ship. On 17th August 2017 she was docked at Vlissingen-Oost, Netherlands with the intention to be undocked on the 25th and the same day to be towed towards Vlissingen where she temporarily will be berthed in the Dokhaven waiting for her final berth in the 17th Century dry dock Dok van Perry. On 1 September 2017 she will be officially handed over by the Royal Netherlands Navy to the foundation Stichting Maritiem Erfgoed Vlissingen which maintain her as a museum ship.

Displacement 790 tons and as dimensions 55,00 x 10,70 x 3,70 metres. Original diesel motors supplying 1.600 hp allowing via 2 screws a speed of 15,5 knots. Her crew numbered 67 men. The armament consisted of 1-4cm machinegun. 

Several Russian naval officers accused of Trotski sympathy according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1937 no. 6

An item referred to the magazine le Yacht dated 4 September 1937 reported that 39 naval officers of the Baltic Fleet and 50 of the East Asiatic squadron included admiral Vitkorov (1) were accused of Trotski (2) sympathy. Also the supreme commanding officer admiral Orloff (3) seemed to be compromised.

Notes
1. Mikhail Vladimirovich Viktorov (24 December 1893 Yarislavl, Russia-executed 1 August 1938), commander in chief ofd soviet naval forces between August 1937-January 1938, served in the navy between 1913-1937.
2. Leon Trotsky (26 October 1879 near Yelizavetgrad, Kherson Governorate, nowadays Ukraine-murdered on 21 August 1940 Coyoacán, Mexico), Marxist revolutionary , theorist and Soviet politician, the last stadium of his life living in exile.
3. Vladimir Mitrofanovich Orlov (15 July 1895 Kherson, Ukraine-executed 28 July 1938), commander in chief between July 1931-July 1937, served in the navy between 1916-1937. Arrested on 10 July 1937. Preceded by the Romuald Muklevich and succeeded by the Mikhail Viktorov. 

Royal Canadian Navy modernizing and increasing fleet according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1937 no. 6

An item referred to the magazine Marine Rundschau dated June 1937 reporting that Canada bought for 2 million pound sterling the British destroyers Cygnet (1) and Crescent (2) which were renamed Fraser and St. Laurent. The destroyers Champlain (3) and Vancouver (4) however were stricken. Further more were 4 minesweepers (5) under construction, two for the Atlantic and two for the Pacific fleets. The personnel strength was increased with 375 persons to totally 1.339 persons.

Notes
1. Building ordered on 9 July 1930, laid down by Vickers-Armstrong, Barrow-in Furness, England with yard number 667 on 1 December 1930, launched on 29 September 1931, complete on 1 April 1932, sold to Canada on 1 February 1937, commissioned as the St. Laurent (H83) on 17 February 1937, decommissioned on 10 October 1945 and broken up in 1947. C-class destroyer.
2. Laid down by Vickers-Armstrong, Barrow-in-Furness, England on 1 December 1930, launched on 29 September 1931, completed on 15 April 1932, commissioned to Canada on 20 October 1936, commissioned as the Fraser (H48) on 17 February 1937 and sunk in a collision in the Gironde estuary, France with the British light cruiser HMS Calcutta on 25 June 1940. C-class destroyer.
3. Building ordered in June 1917, launched by Thornycroft as the Torbay on 6 March 1919, transferred to the Royal Canadian Navy on 1 March 1928, renamed Champlain, decommissioned on 25 November 1935 and sold to be broken up in 1937. Thornycroft S-class destroyer.
4. Building ordered in June 1917, laid down as the Toreador by Thornycroft in November 1917, launched on 7 December 1918, completed in April 1919, loaned to the Royal Canadian Navy in 1927, renamed as Vancouver commissioned on 1 March 1928, decommissioned on 25 November 1936 and arrived at Vancouver on 24 April 1937 to be broken up. Thornycroft S-class destroyer.
5. This must be the Fundy-class, succeeded by the Bangor-class consisting of the Comox (J64), Fundy (J88), Gaspe (J94) and Nootka (J35). All four launched and commissioned in 1938. 

Canada strengthening defence of Vancouver and Victoria and increasing nvy harbour Esquimault aaccording to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1937 no. 6

An item referred to the magazine Marine Rundschau dated June 1937 reporting that at Vancouver a large airfield was to be founded and anti aircraft batteries added to the defence. The navy harbour Esquimaut yet of small importance was to be increased and further more were the defence works of Victoria to be renewed and anti aircraft batteries deployed. 

Canada consolidating sovereignty over islands in the arctic zone service according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1937 no. 6

An item referred to the U.S.R. dated 5 August 1937 reporting that a polar expedition left Montreal, Canada to the arctic zone to consolidating the Canadian sovereignty over the larger islands. The expedition was a result of the in creasing Russian interest in the area. 

Canada strengthening defence along coastline of British Columbia service according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1937 no. 6

An item reported that the Canadian parliament approved a budget of 1,4 million pound sterling needed to strengthen the Canadian West coastline (British Columbia) by founding an aircraft station at Prince Rupert and coastal fortress at Straat Johnson [Johnstone Strait] where all ships destined for Vancouver passed. 

Friday, 18 August 2017

Dutch inland plough boat (ex-TV 165 1975-2007) Janneke 2007-

Harbour Vlissingen-Oost, Netherlands 18 August 2017

Dimensions 15,7 x 4,8 x 2,1 x 2,3 (hold) metres. Owned by Dutch Dredging Baggerbedrijf De Boer Holding B.V, Sliedrecht, Netehrlands since 9 May 2007.  Built as the RV 165 for the Koninklijke Marechaussee (royal military police) by Damen, Hardinxveld-Giessendam, Netherlands with yard number 1433 on 17 June 1975. 

Belgian tug Union Emerald 2005-

Harbour Vlissingen-Oost, Netherlands 18 August 2017

Belgium-flagged, homeport Antwerp, Belgium, IMO 9314296, MMSI 205417000 and call sign OROE. Gross tonnage 493 tons, summer deadweight 92 tons and as dimensions 33 x 11 x 5,6 metres. Built in 2005 at Astilleros Armon, Navia, Spain. Owned by URS Belgium, Antwerp, Belgium and managed by Union de Remorquage et de Sauvetage, Antwerp, Belgium. 

Dutch tug Southampton 2017-

Harbour Vlissingen-Oost, Netherlands 18 August 2017

Malta-flagged or St. Vincent-flagged, homeport Valletta, IMO 9816672, MMSI 248381000 and call sign 9HA4635. ASD tug 2913. Displacement (full) 705 tons and as dimensions 29,10 (over all) x 13,23 (over all) x 5,50 (draught aft) x 5,35 (depth at side) metres. Power  2x2525 kW. Bollard pull 80,0 tons. Speed 13,7 knots. Launched by Damen Shipyards Gorinchem, Gorinchem, Netherlands/Galati, Romania with building number 513115 on 31 March 2017 for Kotug Smit Towage and delivered June 2017. 

Norwegian Maltese tug (ex-Boa Njord 2010-2013) SD Salvor 2013-

Harbour Vlissingen-Oost, Netherlands 18 August 2017

Malta-flagged, homeport Valletta, IMO 9551911, MMSI 248465000and callsign 9HA2375. Ex-Boa Njord renamed April 2013. Gross tonnage 490 tons, net tonnage 147 tons and dimensions 30 (between perpendiculars)-32 (over all) x 11,60 x 5,36 x 20 (air draft)metres. Bollard pull 67 ton.Maximum speed 13,5 knots. Main engines 2x1.920 kW. Caterpillar 3516 BHD. Built in 2010 at the Medyilmaz Shipyard, Karadeniz Eregli, Turkey. Owned by Edeisvaag, Haugesund, Norwaycand managed by Kotug International, Rotterdam, Netherlands. In 2014 still owned by Elisabeth, Gzira, Malta.