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Monday, 16 October 2017

American aircraft carrier USS Intrepid 1941-





New York, USA 2 October 2017

Laid down as part of the Essex-class aircraft carriers by Newport New Shipbuilding, Virginia, USA on 1 December 1941, launched on 26 April 1943, commissioned on 16 August 1943, reclassified as attack carrier (VCA-11) on 1 October 1952, reclassified as anti submarine warfare carrier (CVS-11) on 8 December 1962, decommissioned on 15 March 1974, stricken on 23 February 1982 and nowadays museum ship [Intrepid Sea, Air&Space Museum] at New York, USA. Nicknames Fighting I and Dry I.

Original technical specifications.
Displacement 27.100 (standard)-36.380 (full load) tons and as dimension 250 (waterline)-266 (overall) x 28 (waterline)-45 (over all) x 8,66 (light)-10,41 (full load) metres or 820-872 x 93-147.6 x 28.5-34.2 feet. Had 3 decks. The designed machinery consisted of 4 Westinghouse geared steam turbines and 8 boilers supplying via the 4 shafts 150.000shp allowing a speed of 33 knots. With a peed of 15 knots was her range 20.000 nautical miles. Crew numbered 2.600 persons. Carried with her 90-100 aircraft for which 1 deck-edge elevator and 2 centerline elevators were available. The armour consisted of a 6cm/2.5”-10cm/4” thick belt, 10cm/4” thick bulkheads while the pilothouse and top steering gear were protected by respectively 4cm/1.5” and 6cm/2.5”. The armament consisted of 4x2&4x1-12,7cm/5” 38 cal guns, 8x4-4cm 56 cal guns, and 46x102cm 78 cal guns. 

Japanese cruisers Iwati and Asama visited Tandjong Priok, Dutch East Indies in 1932

Iwate

Asama

An item reported that the Japanese cruisers Iwati (1) and Asama (2) visited Tandjong Priok, Dutch East Indies between 8-10 April 1932.

Notes
1. Building ordered on 19 July 1898, Part of the Izumo-class armoured cruisers consisting of the Izum0 and Iwate, preceded by the Asama-class and succeeded by the Yakumo. Designed by Sir Philip Watts. Laid down by Armstrong Whitworth&Co., Elswick, England on 11 November 1898, launched on 29 March 1900, completed on 18 March 1901, reclassified 1st class coastal defence ship on 1 September 1921, reclassified 1st class cruiser on 1 July 1942, reclassified training ship in 1943, sunk due to an American air attack at Kure on 25 July 1945, stricken on 30 November 1945 and broken up by Harima Dock Company between 1946-1947.
2. Of the Asama-class armoured cruisers, consisting of the Asama and Tokiwa, succeeded by the Izumo class. Built under the 1896 Naval Expansion Plan. Contract signed not earlier as on 6 July 1897, laid down at Armstrong Whitworth, United Kingdom at own risk on 20 October 1896, launched on 21 March 1898, completed on 18 March 1899, reclassified as a 1st coastal defence ship on 1 September 1921, training ship since 1922, stationary training ship since 5 July 1938, decommissioned on 30 November 1945 and broken up at the Innoshima shipyard, Hitachi Zosen Corporation between 15 August 1946-25 March 1947.

Source
Jaarboek van de Koninklijke Nederlandsche Zeemacht 1931-1932. 

French cruiser Primauguet visited Sabang, Dutch East Indies in 1932


An item reported that the French cruiser Primauguet visited Sabang, Dutch East Indies between 13-15 May 1932.(1)

Note
1. Part of the Duguay-Trouin class light cruisers consisting of the Duguay-Trouin, Laomoot-Picguet and Primauguet, succeeded by the Jeanne d’Arc. Laid down by the Arsenal de Brest, France on 16 August 1923, launched on 21 May 1924, commissioned on 1 April 1927, refitted since 8 November 1941 at Casablanca, Morocco, heavily damaged still lying at Casablanca in a gun battle with the battleship USS Massachusetts and the cruiser USS Wichita resulting in 45 men killed and over the 200 wounded, that night was she burned out despite she was be beached on a reef  was she some days later complete destroyed by the tides.

Source
Jaarboek van de Koninklijke Nederlandsche Zeemacht 1931-1932. 

Australian cruiser HMAS Canberra visited the Dutch East Indies harbours in 1932

Sister ship HMAS Australia

An item reported that the Australian cruiser HMAS Canberra visited the Dutch East Indies harbours Surabaya 22-27 September 1932 and Tandjong Priok 29 September-4 October 1932.(1)

Note
1. County-class Kent sub class heavy cruiser consisting of the Berwick, Cornwall, Cumberland, Kent, Suffolk, Australia and Canberra, preceded by the Hawkins-class and succeeded by the York-class, laid down by John Brown&Company, Clydebank, Scotland with yard number 513 on 9 September 1925, launched on 31 May 1927, commissioned on 9 July 1928, completed on 19 July 1928 and heavily damaged during the battle off Savo Islands against Japanese forces on 9 August 1942 was she to be scuttled.

Source
Jaarboek van de Koninklijke Nederlandsche Zeemacht 1931-1932. 

French anti-aircraft cruiser De Grasse 1939-1974

Drawing by G.J.F. Naerebout in Van Zee tot Zee

Laid down at Arsenal de Orient, Brest, France in 1939, captured still just 28% complete by the German forces in June 1940, conversion into a light aircraft carrier temporarily called II planned in April 1942, conversion ordered on 3 December 1942, conversion however ended in February 1943, launched on 11 September 1946, works topped and redesigned as anti-aircraft cruiser, commissioned on 10 September 1956, modernized May 1964-February 1966, used for nuclear tests in French Polynesia, decommissioned in 1973, stricken on 25 January 1974 and the same year broken up. The building of her sister ships Chateaurenault and Guichen was cancelled.

Original technical specifications according to the 1930 design/ Displacement 8.000 9standard)-11.431 (full load) tons and as dimensions 180,4 (waterline) x 18,6 x 5,5 metres. The machinery was to consist of steam turbines and 4 boilers delivering via 2 shafts 110.000 hp allowing a speed of 35 knots. The crew was to number 691 men. The armour consisted of a 10cm thick belt, 3,8cm thick deck with the gun turrets and conning tower protected by respectively 10cm and 9,5cm. The armament consisted of 3x3-15,2cm guns, 3x2-10cm guns, 8-3,7cm gun, 8-13,2mm machineguns, 6-55cm torpedo tubes and 2 seaplanes for which she was fitted out with 2 catapults.

Technical specifications after her completion as anti aircraft-cruiser.
Displacement 9.389 (standard)-12.350 I(full load) tons and as dimensions 199,3 x 18,6 (waterline)-21,5 x 5,54 metres or 653.10 x 61.0-70.6 x 18.2 feet. The machinery consisted of 2 x52.500hp Rateau turbine sets and 4 boilers allowing a speed o 33m8 knots. The crew numbered 560 (after 1966)750 men. The armour consisted of a 10cm/3.9” thick belt, a 3,8cm/1.5” thick deck, 2cm/0.70” thick torpedo bulkheads and 2cm/0.70”-6cm/2.36” thick bulkheads. The armament consisted of 8x-12,7cm anti aircraft guns and in advance, 10x2-57cm Bofors guns. 

French armoured cruiser Kléber 1898-1917


Part of the Dupleix-class armoured cruisers consisting of the Dupliex, Kléber and Desaix, preceded by the Gueydon-class and succeeded by the Gloire-classs. Ordered on 28 December 1897. Laid down by Forges&Chantiers de la Gironde, Bordeaux, France in April 1898, launched on 20 September 1902, commissioned in 1904 and sunk after striking a mine laid by the German submarine UC 61 off Brest on 27 June 1917.

Displacement 7.700 tons and as dimensions 130 x 17,87 x 7,4 metres or 426.6 x 58.5 x 24.3” feet. Machinery consisted of 3 triple expansion steam engines and 24 Belleville boilers supplying via 3 shafts 17.800 ihp allowing a speed of 20 knots. With a coal bunker capacity of 1.180 tons and a speed of 10 knots was the range 7.600 nautical miles, Crew numbered 531 men. The armament consisted of 4x2-16,4cm/6.5” quick firing guns, 4x1-10cm/3.9” guns, 10x1-4,7cm/1.9” guns and 2-45cm/17.7” surfaced torpedo tubes. Armour consisted of a 4cm/1.6”-10cm/3.9” thick deck, a 5cm/2.0”-7cm/2.8” thick deck, 9cm/3.5” thick bulkheads with the gun turrets, barbettes and conning tower protected by restively 12cm/4.7”-16cm/6.3”, 4cm/1,6”-12cm/4.7” and 8cm/3.1” thick armour. 

Venetian galley Espiritu Santo in 1572

Part of the Holy League fleet commanded by Don Juan de Austria gathered off Gumenizas on 9 September 1572. Part of the linker wing commanded by Soranzo. Commanding officer Marco Cimera.

Source
Armada española desde la union de los reinos de castilla y aragon. C. Fernandez Duro, volume 2, 1896, 176-180. 

Venetian galley Ninfa in 1572

Part of the Holy League fleet commanded by Don Juan de Austria gathered off Gumenizas on 9 September 1572. Part of the linker wing commanded by Soranzo. Commanding officer Daniel Tron.

Source
Armada española desde la union de los reinos de castilla y aragon. C. Fernandez Duro, volume 2, 1896, 176-180. 

Venetian galley Cristo Resucitado in 1572

Part of the Holy League fleet commanded by Don Juan de Austria gathered off Gumenizas on 9 September 1572. Part of the linker wing commanded by Soranzo. Commanding officer Sebastian Priuli.

Source
Armada española desde la union de los reinos de castilla y aragon. C. Fernandez Duro, volume 2, 1896, 176-180. 

Venetian galley Cristo in 1572

Part of the Holy League fleet commanded by Don Juan de Austria gathered off Gumenizas on 9 September 1572. Part of the linker wing commanded by Soranzo. Commanding officer Juan baptista Quirini.

Source
Armada española desde la union de los reinos de castilla y aragon. C. Fernandez Duro, volume 2, 1896, 176-180. 

Venetian galley Galera in 1572

Part of the Holy League fleet commanded by Don Juan de Austria gathered off Gumenizas on 9 September 1572. Part of the linker wing commanded by Soranzo. Commanding officer Vicencio Benedetto.

Source
Armada española desde la union de los reinos de castilla y aragon. C. Fernandez Duro, volume 2, 1896, 176-180. 

Sunday, 15 October 2017

USA for the time being not building new battleships according to the Dutch newspaper Algemeen Handelsblad dated 12 July 1934

An item referred to a statement of the American secretary for navy that the USA intended not to lay down a battleship before the Naval Conference of 1935/ At that moment were just cruisers and smaller ships under construction. 

British battleship HMS Nelson finally underway towards the Antilles according to the Dutch newspaper Algemeen Handelsblad dated Saturday 20 January 1934


An item dated London, England 19th reported that the British battleship Nelson on the Friday before finally left Portsmouth, England towards the Antilles while it was since last Sunday due to the worse weather conditions not possible to leave the harbour.(1)

Note
1. Sister ship Rodney. Pennant 28. A simplified design of the N-3 battleships which was cancelled by the British Royal navy as a result of the Washing Naval Treaty of 1922. She was to able to compete with the USS Colorado and the Japanese Nagato battleship classes. Her building was ordered in 1922, laid down on 28 December at Armstrong-Whitworth, Newcastle launched on 3 September 1925, commissioned on 15 August 1927, 1941-1942 extensively repairs needed as a result of an Italian torpedo, decommissioned in February 1948 and on 15 March a year begun her breaking up. 

German pocket battleship Admiral Scheer replaced aged battleship Hessen according to the Dutch newspaper De Telegraaf dated 13 November 1934

Sister ship Admiral Graf Spee of the Deutschland-class

Braunschweig-class
Hessen after conversion into target

An item dated Wilhelmshafen, Germany 12th reported that on the navy yard the German armoured ship Admiral Scheer was commissioned and at the same time the old battleship Hessen decommissioned.

Notes
1. Later classified as heavy cruiser. Laid down by Kriegsmarinewerft Wilhelmshaven, Germany on 25 June 1931, launched on 1 April 1933, commissioned on 12 November 1934 and sunk by British air attack on 9 April 1945.
2. Laid down with the contract name “L” at the Germaniawerft, Kiel with yard number 100 in April 1902, launched by princess Irene von Hessen-Darmstadt on 18 September 1903, commissioned on 19 September 1905,  target in the Baltic Sea in December 1916, decommissioned on 18 January 1917, disarmed and converted into an accommodation for submarine crews at Brunsbüttel, Germany nicknamed SMS Kleinste Fahrt, modernized in 1924, decommissioned on 5 January 1925, replaced by the pocket battleship Admiral Scheer decommissioned on 12 November 1934, converted into a radio-controlled target decommissioned on 1 April 1937, used as target and as icebreaker in the Baltic and North Sea between 1939-1945, ceded to Russia at Libau, Latvia in January 1946, renamed Tsel and finally broken up in 1960. Of the Braunschweig-class consisting of the Braunschweig, Elsass, Hessen, Lotharingen and Preussen. Preceded by the Wittelsbach-class and succeeded by the Deutschland-class. 

British battleship HMS Nelson temporarily grounded according to the Dutch newspaper Algemeen Handelbslad dated 12 January 1934


An item reported that the same morning the British battleship Nelson was stranded when leaving the harbour of Portsmouth, England. It was feared that she could be refloated before midnight.(1)

Note
1. Sister ship Rodney. Pennant 28. A simplified design of the N-3 battleships which was cancelled by the British Royal navy as a result of the Washing Naval Treaty of 1922. She was to able to compete with the USS Colorado and the Japanese Nagato battleship classes. Her building was ordered in 1922, laid down on 28 December at Armstrong-Whitworth, Newcastle launched on 3 September 1925, commissioned on 15 August 1927, 1941-1942 extensively repairs needed as a result of an Italian torpedo, decommissioned in February 1948 and on 15 March a year begun her breaking up. 

Torpedo boat by Messrs. John I. Thornycroft&Co. launched for British Royal Navy according to the British magazine The Engineering dated 5 July 1901

An item reported that Messrs. John I. Thornycroft&Co. Limited launched on Tuesday 2nd the third of the four torpedo boats built for account of the British Royal Navy. Dimensions were 160 x 17 feet and measuring 42 tons. Speed was 25 knots. The armament consisted of 2-45,72cm/18” torpedo tubes and 3-3pd quick firing guns. 

German 3-mast bark (ex-Elisabeth Bandi 1919-1931, Bandi 1931-1938, Seute Deern 1938-1954, Pieter Albrecht Koerts 1954-1964) Seute Deern 1964-


Bremerhaven, Germany 3 March 2017

Launched by Gulfport Shipbuilding Co., Gulfport, USA in 1919 as the 4 mast gaff schooner Elisabeth Bandi for account of the Marine Coal Company, New Orleand, USA, since 1925 of Water E. Reid, 1931 William Uskanen, 1935 Yrjänen&Kumpp/Laiva Bandi, 1938 John T. Essberger, 1954 Stichting Pieter Albrecht Koerts (Delfzijl, Netherlands), 1964 Ena Hardisty, 1965 Hans Richartsz and since 1972 of the Deutsches Schiffahrtsmuseum Bremerhaven. Marsh pine-built but not coppered. Sold in 1931 to William Uskanen, Sotkoma, Finland in 1931, renamed Bandi used in timber trade between Finland, Denmark en England. Sold on 7 November 1938 to John T. Essberger, Hamburg, Germany and converted by Blohm&Voss into a 3-mast bark steel rigged between 16 December 1938-15 June 1939 and renamed Seute Deern. Dimensions 75,7 (over all) x 11,3 x 4 (maximum) metres and a gross register tonnage of 813,57 tons. 

Venetian galley Cristo Resucitado in 1572

Part of the Holy League fleet commanded by Don Juan de Austria gathered off Gumenizas on 9 September 1572. Part of the linker wing commanded by Soranzo. Commanding officer Ludovico Cicuta.

Source
Armada española desde la union de los reinos de castilla y aragon. C. Fernandez Duro, volume 2, 1896, 176-180. 

Venetian galley Santa Catalina in 1572

Part of the Holy League fleet commanded by Don Juan de Austria gathered off Gumenizas on 9 September 1572. Part of the linker wing commanded by Soranzo. Commanding officer Francisco Bono.

Source
Armada española desde la union de los reinos de castilla y aragon. C. Fernandez Duro, volume 2, 1896, 176-180. 

Papal galley Victoria in 1572

Part of the Holy League fleet commanded by Don Juan de Austria gathered off Gumenizas on 9 September 1572. Part of the linker wing commanded by Soranzo. Commanding officer Bachip Guirie de Pisa?

Source
Armada española desde la union de los reinos de castilla y aragon. C. Fernandez Duro, volume 2, 1896, 176-180. 

Neapolitan galley Gitana in 1572

Part of the Holy League fleet commanded by Don Juan de Austria gathered off Gumenizas on 9 September 1572. Part of the linker wing commanded by Soranzo. Commanding officer Gabriel de Medina.

Source
Armada española desde la union de los reinos de castilla y aragon. C. Fernandez Duro, volume 2, 1896, 176-180. 

Neapolitan galley Guzmana in 1572

Part of the Holy League fleet commanded by Don Juan de Austria gathered off Gumenizas on 9 September 1572. Part of the linker wing commanded by Soranzo. Commanding officer Francisco de Ojeda.

Source
Armada española desde la union de los reinos de castilla y aragon. C. Fernandez Duro, volume 2, 1896, 176-180. 

Saturday, 14 October 2017

American aircraft carrier USS Intrepid 1941-




New York, USA 29 September 2017

Laid down as part of the Essex-class aircraft carriers by Newport New Shipbuilding, Virginia, USA on 1 December 1941, launched on 26 April 1943, commissioned on 16 August 1943, reclassified as attack carrier (VCA-11) on 1 October 1952, reclassified as anti submarine warfare carrier (CVS-11) on 8 December 1962, decommissioned on 15 March 1974, stricken on 23 February 1982 and nowadays museum ship [Intrepid Sea, Air&Space Museum] at New York, USA. Nicknames Fighting I and Dry I.

Original technical specifications.
Displacement 27.100 (standard)-36.380 (full load) tons and as dimension 250 (waterline)-266 (overall) x 28 (waterline)-45 (over all) x 8,66 (light)-10,41 (full load) metres or 820-872 x 93-147.6 x 28.5-34.2 feet. Had 3 decks. The designed machinery consisted of 4 Westinghouse geared steam turbines and 8 boilers supplying via the 4 shafts 150.000shop allowing a speed of 33 knots. With a peed of 15 knots was her range 20.000 nautical miles. Crew numbered 2.600 persons. Carried with her 90-100 aircraft for which 1 deck-edge elevator and 2 centerline elevators were available. The armour consisted of a 6cm/2.5”-10cm/4” thick belt, 10cm/4” thick bulkheads while the pilothouse and top steering gear were protected by respectively 4cm/1.5” and 6cm/2.5”. The armament consisted of 4x2&4x1-12,7cm/5” 38 cal guns, 8x4-4cm 56 cal guns, and 46x102cm 78 cal guns. 

Greek bulk carrier Vita Kouan 2013-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 9 October 2017

Cyprus-flagged, homeport Limassol, IMO 9750036, MMSI 212122000 and call sign 5BKT4. Owned by Maduro Shipping Inc. and managed by Grecomar Shipping Agency Ltd., Athens, Greece. Laid down by Yaizhou Kouan Shipbuilding Co. Ltd with yard number TK0806 on 29 November 1913, launched on 30 September 2015 and completed on 16 March 2016. 

Norwegian oil/chemical tanker Klara 2009-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 8 October 2017

Panama-flagged, IMO 9405904, MMSI 372101000 and call sign 3EVM4. Owned and managed by V.Ships Norway, Oslo, Norway. Built by Hyundai Mipo Dockyard, Ulsan, South Korea in 2009. 

Monaco oil/chemical tanker (ex-Antignano 2002-2012) Duke 1 2012-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 8 October 2017

Panama-flagged, IMO 9228784, MMSI 352642000 and call sign 3FBO. Ex-Antignano renamed December 2012. Owned and managed by Sea World Management, Monaco. Built by Hyundai Mipo Dockyard, Ulsan, South Korea in 2002. 

Dutch utility vessel Yvonne W 2011-




Inner harbour of Vlissingen, Netherlands 9 October 2017

Netherlands-flagged, IMO 9631498, MMSI 246690000 and call sign PCMG. Built by Neptune Shipyard, Hardinxveld-Giessendam, Netherlands in 2011. Owned by Stemat B.V., Rotterdam, Netherlands. Ex-NP 396

Italian oil/chemical tanker (ex-Global Taurus 2011-2014) Caroline A 2014-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 10 October 2017

Italy-flagged, IMO 9570565, MMSI 247353200 and call sign IBGF. Ex-Global Taurus renamed April 2014. Owned and managed by Marittima Emiliana, Parma, Italy. Built by Yangzi Shipbuilding, Yizheng, China in 2011

Dutch research/survey vessel Geo Focus 2012-


Inner harbour of Vlissingen, Netherlands 9 October 2017

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Eemshaven, Netherlands, IMO 9628855, MMSI 246836000 and call sign PCOS. Built by De Haas Scheepswerf, Maassluis, Netherlands in 2012. Operated by Geo Tender IV BV (Geo Plus), Scheemda, Netherlands. 

Dutch deck cargo ship Bigroll Barentsz 2016-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 10 October 2017

Netherlands-flagged. IMO 9710464, MMSI 244830430 and call sign PCPC. Owned and managed by Bigroll Shipping, Amsterdam, Netherlands. Built by Cosco, Beijing, China in 2016. 

Greek bulk carrier (ex-TPC Timaru 2010-2012, Timaru 2012-2013) Elin 2013-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 9 October 2017

Marshall islands-flagged, homeport Majuro, IMO 9460289, MMSI 538004037 and call sign V7US9. Ex-TPC Timaru renamed May 2012 and Timaru renamed September 2013. Owned and managed by Empire Bulkers, Athens, Greece. Built by Samjin Weihai, Weihai, China on 2010. 

Greek bulk carrier Cape Island 2004-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 7 October 2017

Cyprus-flagged, homeport Limassol, IMO 9277711, MMSI 212054000 and call sign P2QT9. Owned and managed by Seascope Shipping, Athens, Greece. Built by Hyundai Heavy Industries, Ulsan, South Korea in 2004. 

Chinese container ship CSCL Uranus 2012-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 7 October 2017

Hong Kong/China-flagged, homeport Hong Kong, IMO 9467304, MMSI 477423800 and call sign VRKD5. Built by Samsung Shipbuilding&Heavy Industries, Geoje, South Korea in 2012. Owned by China Shipping Container Lines and managed by China International Shipmanagement, both at Shanghai, China. 

Galley Capitana from provedor Canale in 1572

Part of the Holy League fleet commanded by Don Juan de Austria gathered off Gumenizas on 9 September 1572. Part of the linker wing commanded by Soranzo.

Source
Armada española desde la union de los reinos de castilla y aragon. C. Fernandez Duro, volume 2, 1896, 176-180. 

Galley Patrona of David Imperial in 1572

Part of the Holy League fleet commanded by Don Juan de Austria gathered off Gumenizas on 9 September 1572. Part of the linker wing commanded by Soranzo. Commanding officer Nicolo Delio.

Source
Armada española desde la union de los reinos de castilla y aragon. C. Fernandez Duro, volume 2, 1896, 176-180. 

Galley Patrona of Nicolo Doria in 1572

Part of the Holy League fleet commanded by Don Juan de Austria gathered off Gumenizas on 9 September 1572. Part of the linker wing commanded by Soranzo.

Source
Armada española desde la union de los reinos de castilla y aragon. C. Fernandez Duro, volume 2, 1896, 176-180. 

Neapolitan galley Brava in 1572

Part of the Holy League fleet commanded by Don Juan de Austria gathered off Gumenizas on 9 September 1572. Part of the linker wing commanded by Soranzo. Commanding officer Miguel de Quesada.

Source
Armada española desde la union de los reinos de castilla y aragon. C. Fernandez Duro, volume 2, 1896, 176-180. 

Danish boat Grevlingen 1743

Mentioned in 1743, an armament of 6 guns and with a crew numbering 9 men.

Source
H.G. Garde. Efterretninger om den dankse of norske seemagt. Copenhagen, 1835.

Danish boat Windhunden 1743

Mentioned in 1743, an armament of 6 guns and with a crew numbering 9 men.

Source
H.G. Garde. Efterretninger om den dankse of norske seemagt. Copenhagen, 1835. 

Danish boat Mynden 1743

Mentioned in 1743, an armament of 6 guns with a crew numbering 9 men.

Source
H.G. Garde. Efterretninger om den dankse of norske seemagt. Copenhagen, 1835.

Danish boat Reven 1743

Mentioned in 1743, an armament of 6 guns and a crew numbering 9 men.

Source
H.G. Garde. Efterretninger om den dankse of norske seemagt. Copenhagen, 1835.

Danish boat Hayen 1743

Mentioned in 1743, an armament of 6 guns and a crew numbering 11 men.

Source
H.G. Garde. Efterretninger om den dankse of norske seemagt. Copenhagen, 1835.

Swedish 1st rate Rutenkrans or Rosenkran 1599-1611

First mentioned in 1599, last mentioned in1611, an armament of 32 guns and a crew numbering 45 men.

Source
Sveriges krig 1611-1632. Stockholm, 1937, bilagsband 1. 

Friday, 13 October 2017

Chinese bulk carrier Tomahawk 2008-2010, Tongli Yamtai 2010-2012) Orient Rise 2012-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 23 September 2017

Panama-flagged, IMO 9427342, MMSI 353400000 and call sign 3FDQ0. Ex-BS20060355 China Changjiang Shipping Group Qingsh renamed 4 February 2008, ex-Tomahawk renamed 30 March 2010 and ex-Tongli Yantai renamed July 2012. Owned and managed by Fortune Ocean Shipmanagement, Yantai, China. Built by Qingshan Shipyard, Wuhan, China in 2010. 

German general cargo ship (ex-North Sea Island 2012) BBC Saphire 2012-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 24 September 2017

Antigua&Barbuda-flagged, homeport Saint John’s, IMO 9504798, MMSI 3058590000 and call sign V2FZ4. Ex-North Sea Island renamed December 2010. Owned and managed by Bockstiegel Reederei, Emden, Germany. Built by Jiangzhou Union Shipbuilding, Rui Chang, China in 2012. 

Bermudian LPG tanker Sansovino 2016-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 3 October 2017

Singapore-flagged, IMO 9734525, MMSI 565960000 and call sign 9V2729. Built by Hyundai Heavy Industries, Ulsan, South Korea in 2016. Managed and owned by Petredec, Hamilton. Bermuda. 

Norwegian LPG tanker Clipper Jupiter 2015-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 24 September 2017

Norway International Register-flagged, IMO 9699505, MMSI 257694000 and call sign LATV7. Owned and managed by Solvang, Stavanger, Norway. Built by Hyundai Heavy Industries, Ulsan, South Koreas as the Hyundai Ulsan 2708 in 2015.

Japanese oil products tanker Marine Express 2009-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 24 September 2017

Panama-flagged, IMO 9403322, MMSI 354715000 and call sign 3FHX2. Owned by Yamamaru Kisen, Onomichi, Japan and managed by Anglo Eastern Shipmanagement Singapore, Singapore. Built by Shin Kurushima Onishi Shipyard, Imabari, Japan in 2009. 

Spain sending squadron towards Tangier, Morocco according to the Dutch newspaper Soerabaijasch handelsblad dated 7 June 1904

Numancia

An item dated London, England 7th reported that a Spanish squadron consisting of the battleships Numancia (1) and Pelayo (2) and the cruiser Cisnewa (3) departed towards Tangier, Morocco.(4)

Notes
1. Armoured frigate. Laid down by Forges et Chantiers de la Méditerranée, La Seyne, France on 22 April 1862, launched on 19 November 1863, completed on 17 December 1864 and finally sunk while towed on 17 December 1916.
2. Building ordered in November 1884, laid down by La Seyne, France in April 1885, launched on 5 February 1887, completed in summer 1888 an finally broken up in 1925.
3. The Cardenal Cisneros of the Princesa Asturias class of armoured cruiser, laid down by the Arsenal del Ferrol, Spain on 1 September 1890, launched on 19 march 1897, completed on 30 March 1903 and wrecked on 28 October 1905.
4. As a result of the First Moroccan Crisis or Tangier Crisis March 1905-May 1906 dealing with the status Morocco, with Germany supporting the sovereignty of the Moroccan sultan Abdelaziz against France and United Kingdom. 

The Japanese cruisers Kasuga and Nisshin according to the Dutch newspaper Soerabaijasch handelsblad dated 11 February 1904

Kasuga. Source l'Illustration dated 16 January 1904

Nisshin. Source l'Illustration dated 16 January 1904

Crews embarking at Genua, Italy, Source l'Illustration dated 16 January 1904

With our thanks to Enrico

An item referred to the American newspaper New York Herald which supplied more details about the new Japanese cruisers Kasuga (1) and Nisshin.(2) Both ships left Genoa, Italy on 9th January for adjusting their compasses and returned then to the harbour where their complete crews came on board. The crew of the Kasuga consisted for the main part of Italians and of the Nisshin mainly British sailors. The engines were built under supervision of engineers of the firm Ansaldo and Armstrong. In the evening anchored both cruisers in the roads leaving the same night.

Notes
1. Italian Guiseppe Garibaldi-class armoured cruiser. Building ordered by Argentina on 23 December 1901, laid down by Gio. Ansaldo&C., Genoa-Sestri Ponente, Italy as San Mitra on 10 March 1902, launched on 22 October 1902, renamed Bernardino Rivadavia, bought by Japan on 30 December 1903, commissioned as Kasuga on 7 January 1904, training ship since later 1920s, disarmed and hulked becoming a barracks ship in 1942, sunk on 18 July 1945, salvaged and broken up in 1948. Earlier sale negotiations between Argentina and Russia failed because of the asked price.
2. Italian Guiseppe Garibaldi-class armoured cruiser. Building ordered by Argentina on 23 December 1901, laid down by Gio. Ansaldo&C., Genoa-Sestri Ponente, Italy as San Roca On 29 March 1902, launched as Marina Moreno on 9 February 1903, bought on 30 December 1903, commissioned as Nisshin on 7 January 1904, training ship since 1927, stricken on 1 April 1935, sunk while used as target in 1936, salvaged and reused as target on 18 January 1942. Earlier sale negotiations between Argentina and Russia failed because of the asked price. 

More budget available for renewing French fleet according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1897-1898 No. 6

An item referred to the magazine le Yacht reporting that in the meeting of the French Chamber for the 3rd time a supplementary budget of 7.105.750 francs was discussed for new building. The cabinet promised to accord the needed finances for renewing the fleet and the budget of 7 million francs was the first step. The budget consisted of 3.725.750 francs for new building 1.500.000 francs for maintenance and repairs and 1.880.000 francs for works on the Tunisian coast at Bizerte. The French minister of navy was allowed to built new ships by the naval shipyards of elsewhere for around 80 million consisting of 2-9.500 armoured cruisers, 2-7.500 armoured cruisers, 4-300 ton destroyers and 9-85 torpedo boats for the coastal defence. This was extra new building above the ships to be built under the new building program of the law of 1897. 

New design gun turrets for American battleships USS Alabama, Wisconsin and Illinois according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1897-1898 No. 6


An item reported that the US navy department accepted steel made turrets of a new type to be used on board of the battleships Alabama (1), Wisconsin (2) and Illinois.(3) The turrets were designed by naval engineer Dashiell (4) and in which 32,5cm guns were to be mounted. The turret sides consisted of vertical plates and fore and aft by sloping plates under an angle of 42 degrees. The thickness of the plates was 35cm/13.7”. With such an angle it was considered impossible that any shell would penetrate the plate while the vertical plates could resist incoming 30cm shells fired over a distance of 2.000 yards. One of the main advantages of the sloping plates was that shells would bounce.

Notes
1. BB-8. Part of the Illinois-class consisting of the Illinois, Alabama and Wisconsin. Preceded by the Kearsage-class and succeeded by the Maine-class. Laid down by William Cramp&Sons, Philadelphia, USA on 1 December 1896, launched on 18 May 1898, commissioned on 16 October 1900, extensively modernized 17 August 1909-begin 1912, decommissioned on 7 May 1920, handed over to the War Department on 15 September 1921, sunk while used by the Army Air Service on 27 September 1921 and sold to be broken up on 19 March 1924. The main armament consisted of 2x2-33cm/13” .35 cal guns.
2. BB-9. Part of the Illinois-class consisting of the Illinois, Alabama and Wisconsin. Preceded by the Kearsage-class and succeeded by the Maine-class. Laid down by Union Iron Works on 9 February 1897, launched on 26 November 1898, commissioned on 4 February 1901, intensively modernized 1906-1908, training ship since1912, decommissioned on 15 May 1920, stricken on 1 July 1921 and sold to be broken up. In January 1922. The main armament consisted of 2x2-33cm/13” .35 cal guns.
3. BB-7. Part of the Illinois-class consisting of the Illinois, Alabama and Wisconsin. Preceded by the Kearsage-class and succeeded by the Maine-class. Laid down at Newport News Shipbuilding Company, Newport News, Virginia, USA on 10 February 1897, launched by Miss Nancy Leiter on 4 October 1898, commissioned on 16 September 1901, training ship since 1912, lent to the State of New York on behalf of th New York States Militia in 1919, decommissioned on 15 May 1920, converted into a floating armoury in 1924, renamed Prairie State and reclassified as IX-15 on 8 January 1941, barracks ship after Second World War, stricken on 26 March 1956 and sold to the Bethlehem Steel Company be broken up on 18 May 1955. The main armament consisted of 2x2-33cm/13” .35 cal guns.
4. Robert Brooke Dashiell (26 July 1860 Woodville, Virginia, USA-8 March 1899 Washington, D.C. USA), assistance naval constructor since 7 February 1895. 

Venetian galley Cruz in 1572

Part of the Holy League fleet commanded by Don Juan de Austria gathered off Gumenizas on 9 September 1572. Part of the linker wing commanded by Soranzo. Commanding officer Juan Antonio Canale.

Source
Armada española desde la union de los reinos de castilla y aragon. C. Fernandez Duro, volume 2, 1896, 176-180. 

Venetian galley San Pablo in 1572

Part of the Holy League fleet commanded by Don Juan de Austria gathered off Gumenizas on 9 September 1572. Part of the linker wing commanded by Soranzo. Commanding officer David Bembo.

Source
Armada española desde la union de los reinos de castilla y aragon. C. Fernandez Duro, volume 2, 1896, 176-180. 

Venetian galley Nuestra Señora in 1572

Part of the Holy League fleet commanded by Don Juan de Austria gathered off Gumenizas on 9 September 1572. Part of the linker wing commanded by Soranzo. Commanding officer Marco Antonio Pisani.

Source
Armada española desde la union de los reinos de castilla y aragon. C. Fernandez Duro, volume 2, 1896, 176-180. 

Venetian galley Arco in 1572

Part of the Holy League fleet commanded by Don Juan de Austria gathered off Gumenizas on 9 September 1572. Part of the linker wing commanded by Soranzo. Commanding officer Pedro Cane.

Source
Armada española desde la union de los reinos de castilla y aragon. C. Fernandez Duro, volume 2, 1896, 176-180. 

The Bulgarian Koralovag shipyard at Varna according to an American CIA report dated 13 March 1953

An item reported that this shipyard at Varna was a responsibility of the Bulgarian Maritime Commission at Sofia, Bulgaria under control of the Ministry of Railways. The yard was able to repair ships and the newbuilding of maximum 3.000 ton ships. The personnel numbered 3.000 labourers including several Soviet specialists. Director of the shipyard was now the Bulgarian Atanaov. The CIA informant had never heard of plans for building reinforced concrete ships of any construction for the Yugoslavian navy. Neither he heard of any sabotage acts. The rubble of demolished buildings was used for raising the streets and squares of the complete area of the yard with around 50 centimetres. Afterwards was a new carpenter ship with an area of around 1.200 square metres built. To accommodate the personnel were 14 blocks of houses each containing 14 apartments under construction of which already some were completed.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, document number CIA-RPD80-00810A000500330005-5.

The facilities of the Bulgarian harbour Nesebur according to an American CIA report dated 13 March 1953

An item reported that this harbour was used as an anchorage by the fishery and the coastal cargo trade.

The Bulgarian harbour Balchik according to an American CIA report dated 13 March 1953
An item reported that this harbour was used by naval ships although it was (yet) not known of the ships belonged to the Bulgarian either Soviet forces. An airfield with a concrete made runway and length of around 1.800 metres was available.


Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, document number CIA-RPD80-00810A000500330005-5.

The Bulgarian island of Sveti Anastas according to an American CIA report dated 13 March 1953

An item reported that this island (1) was a Soviet military zone with as known industry a coal mine, a rock quarry and a small repair shipyard for ships coming for and going from the coal mine.

Note
1. The St. Anastasia island in the Black Sea on a distance of 1,4 kilometres off the coast near Chernomorets, used as a prison since 1923 and later also known as Bolshevik Island?

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, document number CIA-RPD80-00810A000500330005-5.

The Bulgarian harbour Cape Emine according to an American CIA report dated 13 March 1953

An item reported that this harbour was completed controlled by the Soviet Union and while all access from land either sea was prohibited were no more details known.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, document number CIA-RPD80-00810A000500330005-5.

The Bulgarian military harbour Sveti Konstantin according to an American CIA report dated 13 March 1953

An item reported that this harbour was situated north east of the town Varna. At the time of the report was made were in the harbour the gunboats Durzki and Khrabi and two torpedo boats lying. It were old boats and their appearance was similar to the description as published by the Annuario della Marina of 1942. There was a small navy workshop available suitable for small repairs despite a relative large number or around 100 labourers.

The personnel of the navy and the radio station was accommodated in 5 or 6 barracks made of wood and masonry located on a distance of 50 metres from the railroad station. The radio station was situated in a wooded area south of the harbour. There were two iron manufactured antennas with a height between 20-25 metres and it seemed to be that there was a small brick building standing between the antennas.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, document number CIA-RPD80-00810A000500330005-5.

Thursday, 12 October 2017

American torpedo bomber Grumman TBF Avenger TBM-1

On board of the American aircraft carrier USS Intrepid (CV-11) New York, USA 2-10-2017

TBM=aircraft manufactured by General Motors. This torpedo bomber since 1942 in service was originally designed to be used by the US Navy and the Marine Corps. Later were also foreign armed forces using Avengers for instance the Royal Netherlands Navy and further more the British Royal Navy, Royal New Zealand Navy, Royal Canadian Navy, Brazilian Navy, Cuban navy, Japanese maritime Self-Defence Forces, French navy and the Uruguayan nvay.

General technical specifications of Avengers: 12,48 (length) x 16,51 (wingspan) x 4,70 (height) metres or 40’11.5”x 54’2” x 15’5” with an wing span of 45,52 square metres/490.02 square feet and a weight of 4.783 (empty)-8.115 (loaded) weight. The crew numbered 3 men. The maximum speed was 442 kilometres/285 miles and the range 1.610 kilometres/1.000 miles. The armament consisted of 7,62mm/0.30” and 12,7mm/0.50” machineguns. Was able to carry a Bliss-Leavitt Mark 13 aerial torpedo, a 907 kilo bomb or 4-225 kilo bombs. Of the TBM-1 were totally 550 built and is similar to the TBF-1. Fitted out with the Sto-Wing patented compound angle wing-folding mechanism to limit the needed storage on board of an aircraft carrier as much as possible.

The Royal Netherlands Navy used Avengers on board of ther aircraft carrier Hr. Ms. Karel Doorman (R81).


German general cargo ship (ex-Palanpur 2010, Hyundai Phoenix 2010-2012, Palanpur 2012-2014) Amoenitas 2014-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 10 October 2017

Antigua&Barbuda-flagged, homeport Saint John’s, IMO 9505510, MMSI 305621000 and call sign V2FB4. Built by Kouan Shipbuilding, Taizhou Jiangsu, China in 2010. Owned and managed by Harren&Partner Shipmanagement, Bremen, Germany. Ex-Palanpur renamed November 2010, Hyundai Phoenix renamed September 2012 and Palanpur renamed 14 June 2014.