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Sunday, 14 February 2016

Dutch paddle steamship 2nd class Zr. Ms. Merapi being fitted out for homeward voyage towards the Netherlands according to the Dutch newspaper Nederlandsche Staatscourant dated 1 March 1861

Model Rijksmuseum Amsterdam, Netherlands. Original link

An item dated The Hague, Netherlands 28th February referred to tidings of 15th January dealing with the movements of the Dutch squadron in the Dutch East Indies. The Dutch steamship Zr. Ms. Merapi captain lieutenant R.L. de Haes was fitted out at the naval establishment at Onrust, Dutch East Indies for her voyage back to the Netherlands.(1)

Note
1. Contract signed with the N.S.M. for of the engines and standard boilers for ƒ 152.500,00 to delivery before 15 April 1843 decision nr. 54 dated 31 July 1840, on stocks at navy yard at Rotterdam, Netherlands 20 October 1840, launched 2 November 1842, according to decision no. 131 dated 17 October commissioned with a crew of 100 men commanded by captain lieutenant Baars, 21 October 1843, departed 27 June 1844 towards the Dutch East Indies, arrived 13 November 1844 at Batavia, towed in the monsoon transports with infantry, artillery and Horses from Bali towards Bali for the expedition in 1846, returned towards the Netherlands on 21 October 1848, arrived at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands in 29 March 1849, decommissioned undergoing repairs at the navy yard at Vlissingen, Netherlands on 15 April 1849, commissioned on 16 March 1851, departed towards the Dutch East Indies on 1 June 1851, voyage towards Norway and Iceland captain lieutenant J.D. Wolterbeek between 3 July-20 September 1856, stricken in 1863, dimensions 52,00 x 10,00 x 4,80 metres, displacement of 546 tons and an armament of 8 guns, decision dated 31 July 1840 to sing contract with the Ned. Stoomboot Mij. to deliver on 15 April 1843engines and boilers for ƒ 152.500,00, barque-rigged and 220 hp horsepower.

Dutch steamship Zr. Ms. Ardjoeno available for active service in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Nederlandsche Staatscourant dated 1 March 1861

An item dated The Hague, Netherlands 28th February referred to tidings of 15th January dealing with the movements of the Dutch squadron in the Dutch East Indies. The steamship Zr. Ms. Ardjoeno captain J.A.K. van Hasselt arrived on 31 December 1860 in the roads of Batavia, Dutch East Indies after being repaired at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies. She was now available for active service.(1)

Note
1. Steam warship, call sign GQCK, on stocks at the navy yard at Amsterdam, Netherlands as Pluto on 4 February 1848, launched on 1 or 2 September 1849, renamed Ardjoeno in December 1849, engines manufactured by the N.S.M. (decided 26 August 1847 for ƒ 210.979,00 to deliver on 15 March 1849), trial on 28 April 1850, departed on 28 December 1850 towards the Dutch East Indies, arrived there on 26 May 1851, docked at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands between 28 March-8 June 1854, transferred to the Dutch East Indies Military Navy on 1 January 1868, stricken in 1873, dimensions 56,00 x 10,70 x 4,80 metres, displacement 1.486 tons and a horsepower of 300 hp.

Dutch screw steamship 3rd class Zr.Ms. Reinier Claeszen stationed off Celebes, Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Nederlandsche Staatscourant dated 1 March 1861

Marinemuseum Den Helder, A/002/031. Bay of Bima 5 January 1861. Original link


An item dated The Hague, Netherlands 28th February referred to tidings of 15th January dealing with the movements of the Dutch squadron in the Dutch East Indies. The Dutch screw steamship Zr.Ms. Reinier Claeszen (1) lieutenant 1st class P.W. Stort departed on 11 December 1860 from Surabaya towards her station in the waters of Celebes, Dutch East Indies. Shortly after her arrival there she cruised for pirates destroying near the small island Sailoos 8 pirate bintanks. A landing party however did not succeeding in taken the pirates prisoners. After returning at Macassar, Dutch East Indies for fresh victuals was the intention to return accompanied by the Zr. Ms. Gedeh (2) to end the piracy at Sailoos.

Notes
1. Call sign GQSN, on stocks at the shipyard of K. Smit jr. Kinderdijk, Netherlands on 4 May 1858, launched on 13 January 1859, dry docked at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands 21-22-July 1859,commissioned on 2 or 16 August 1859, condemned in 1869, sold with boilers on a public auction at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies on 29 January 1870, stricken in 1870, dimensions 45,50 x 9,20 x 4,30 metres, a displacement of 759, tons, an armament of 6 guns, a crew numbering 119 men and a horsepower of 119nhp/250 ehp.
2. First called steam warship, on stocks at the navy yard at Rotterdam, Netherlands 25 October 1846, launched 26 April 1850, commissioned 16 April 1851, docked at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands 13-30 January 1857, in worse condition in , laid up at Surabaya and sold at the navy establishment on Saturday 29 November to be broken up 1862, served also in the Dutch East Indies, dimensions 56.00 (between perpendiculars) x 10.70 x 4.80 metres, displacement of 1.486 tons, an armament of 8 guns and 300 hp horsepower.

Dutch screw steamship 3rd class Zr. Ms. Het Loo serving in the Moluccas, Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Nederlandsche Staatscourant dated 1 March 1861

NIMH inv.nr. 002823. Original link
Model NG-Mc-477 Rijksmuseum Amsterdam, Netherlands. Original link

An item dated The Hague, Netherlands 28th February referred to tidings of 15th January dealing with the movements of the Dutch squadron in the Dutch East Indies. The Dutch screw steamship Zr. Ms. Het Loo (1) captain lieutenant jhr. J.B.E. von Schmidt auf Altenstadt transported troops and victuals from Ambon, Dutch East Indies towards Hatusua, Dutch East Indies and departed on 8 December 1860 from Ambon towards Ternate, Dutch East Indies to replace there – temporarily- the steamship Zr. Ms. Etna.(2)

Notes
1. Call sign GQMR, wood-built, on stocks at the navy yard at Amsterdam, Netherlands 13 May 1858, launched 17 March 1859, commissioned 26 July 1859, docked at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis 26 May-19 June 1865 &12 April-14 August 1867, 21 July-8 August 1871 and 1-3 September 1869, together with the Zr.Ms. Citadel van Antwerpen present when the Dutch colours at the Dutch Gold Coast was stricken, converted at the navy yard at Willemsoord, Netherlands into artillery training ship and commissioned at Willemsoord 16 September 1876, decommissioned and condemned for services outside the Nieuwediep, Netherlands 8 May 1889, accommodation for artillery training ship 25 September, condemned and replaced by the Zr.Ms. Atjeh 1906, decommissioned 8 November and stricken, displacement 759 tons, dimensions 43 x 9,2 x 4,3 metres, coal bunker capacity 100-200 ton, horsepower 115 nhp/250ehp, speed 7-12 (maximum) miles, range (in 187) 7 days full speed, a crew numbering 86 (1877)-100 men and an armament consisting of 2 rifled 16cm guns, 1-15cm gun and 4-12cm guns.
2. Paddle steamship 3rd class, on stocks at the navy yard at Vlissingen, Netherlands by C. Soetermeer on 18 September 1837, contract with the (Nederlandsche Stoomboot Maatschappij (NSM) at Fijenoord for engines, boilers and spare parts for ƒ 152.541,48 according to decision 25 May 1838 no. 1, launched 30 April 1839, commissioned 1 November 1839, departed towards the Dutch West Indies 1 October 1842, returned at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands 16 July 1844, docked at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis 20 June17 July 1845, departed towards Rotterdam, Netherlands for maintenance engines, docked at Hellevoetsluis 3 December 1846-6 February 1847,fitted out with a raised keel 1846, departed towards the Dutch East Indies 7 March 1847, decommissioned and condemned in the Dutch East Indies being in an extremely worse condition and just serving around Java 31 December 1863, reported her sale for ƒ 24.500 to W. Cores de Vries on Saturday morning 2 April 1864, dimensions 47,00 (between perpendiculars) x 9,00 (inner hull)x 3,45 (armed) x 5,04 (hold below main deck) metres, an armament of 4 guns (peace time 2 long and 2 short 30pd guns, in wartime 2-30pd bomb guns and 2-short 30pd guns), 178 hp horsepower and a crew numbering 100 men. 

Dutch screw steamship Zr.Ms. Groningen undergoing repairs at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Nederlandsche Staatscourant dated 1 March 1861

An item dated The Hague, Netherlands 28th February referred to tidings of 15th January dealing with the movements of the Dutch squadron in the Dutch East Indies. The Dutch screw steamship Zr.Ms. Groningen captain lieutenant J. van der Meersch arrived on 4 January 1861 in the roads of Batavia, Dutch East Indies coming from Siam and departed on the 18th of January towards Surabaya, Dutch East Indies for some repairs.

Dutch screw steam ship 2nd class Zr. Ms. Citadel van Antwerpen was stationed off Celebes, Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Nederlandsche Staatscourant dated 1 March 1861

Model Citadel van Antwerpen NG-MC-1077 Rijksmuseum Amsterdam Netherlands. Original link

Zr. Ms. Gedeh

An item dated The Hague, Netherlands 28th February referred to tidings of 15th January dealing with the movements of the Dutch squadron in the Dutch East Indies.
The Dutch screw steamship Zr. Ms. Citadel van Antwerp (1) captain lieutenant G.P.J. Mossel stationed in the waters of Celebes, Dutch East Indies was replaced by the steamship Zr. Ms. Gedeh and arrived in the meantime at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies for some repairs.(2)

Notes
1. Call sign GQFK, on stocks at the navy yard at Amsterdam, Netherlands as the Dordrecht on 19 February 1856, launched in 1857, renamed Citadel van Antwerpen in 1868, lengthened with 2 metres >1865-1868<, decommissioned on 1 January 1878, converted into a hulk to be used during the building of a lighthouse on the Meindertsdroogte, Dutch East Indies in 1878, costs when first fitted out ƒ 517.000,00, displacement 1.780 tons, dimensions 56,00 x 11,05 x 5,40 metres, an armament of 13 guns (6 long 20pd guns, 7 rifled 16cm guns) and a crew numbering 180 men.
2. Paddle steamship 1st class, first called steam warship, on stocks at the navy yard at Rotterdam, Netherlands 25 October 1846, launched 26 April 1850, commissioned 16 April 1851, docked at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands 13-30 January 1857, in worse condition in , laid up at Surabaya and sold at the navy establishment on Saturday 29 November to be broken up 1862, served also in the Dutch East Indies, dimensions 56.00 (between perpendiculars) x 10.70 x 4.80 metres, displacement of 1.486 tons, an armament of 8 guns and 300 hp horsepower.

Dutch screw steamship 2nd class Zr. Ms. Vice Admiraal Koopman stationed in the Moluccas, Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Nederlandsche Staatscourant dated 1 March 1861

Model Rijksmusem Amsterdam, Netherlands. Original link

An item dated The Hague, Netherlands 28th February referred to tidings of 15th January dealing with the movements of the Dutch squadron in the Dutch East Indies. The Dutch screw steam corvette Zr. Ms. Vice Admiraal Koopman captain C.V. Zwaanshals was stationed in the waters of the Moluccas, Dutch East Indies and according to the latest tidings begin December 1860 departed from the roads of Ambon towards Banda, Dutch East Indies. She was to transport the governor general of the Dutch East Indies during his voyage in the Moluccas.

Note
1, Ex-Leeuwarden, call sign GRBS, on stocks at the navy yard at Amsterdam, Netherlands by H.A. van der Speck Obreen 18 October 1856, renamed Vice Admiraal Koopman on 20 May 1857, launched on 29 April 1858, served in the Dutch East Indies, already reported in worse condition with a broken shaft and a weak aft ship with doubts about her decommissioned being condemned and not worth to be repaired on 7 August 1876, sold to be broken up 1877, displacement 1.600 ton, dimensions 56,00 x 11,25 x 5,40 metres, horsepower 250nph/700 ehp allowing a speed of 9 knots, an armament of 11 guns (6 long 30pd guns, 5 rifled 16cm guns) and a crew numbering 140 men.

Dutch screw steam corvette Zr. Ms. Prinses Amelia stationed off Sumatra, Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Nederlandsche Staatscourant dated 1 March 1861

Rijksmuseum Amsterdam, Netherlands. Original link

Model screw lifting device NG-MC-563. Rijksmusem Amsterdam Netherlands. Original link

An item dated The Hague, Netherlands 28th February referred to tidings of 15th January dealing with the movements of the Dutch squadron in the Dutch East Indies. The Dutch screw steam corvette Zr. Ms. Prinses Amelia (1) captain lieutenant A.J. Kroef was stationed at the west coast of Sumatra, Dutch East Indies. According to the latest tiding was she lying in the roads of Padang, Dutch East Indies waiting to be replaced by the Zr. Ms. Pallas.(2)

Notes
1. Former ‘kuil’ corvette Borneo, ‘kuil’corvette, on stocks at the navy yard at Rotterdam, Netherlands 30 August 1845, designed by K. Turk, disassembled and transported to the navy yard of Vlissingen, Netherlands in August 1850, renamed Prinses Amalia on 6 August 1850, laid down by P.A. Bruin 29 July 1853, launched as Princes Amelia as corvette with steam power afternoon Friday 12 October 1855, commissioned on 26 May 1856, call sign GQRL, guard ship at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies 1872-1875, condemned and sold on auction at Surabaya for ƒ 20.000 to be broken up on 9 October 1875, building costs ƒ 560.760,53½, dimensions 36,50 x 10,3 x 4,82 metres as Borneo and as Prinses Amelia 49,8 (load line between perpendiculars)-53,6 (foreside prow-aft side rudder stern) x 11 (inner hull) x 4,5(fore)-5,0 (aft) x 5,71 (depth) metres, displacement, 776 (Borneo)-1.350 (Prinses Amelia) tons, 807 tonnage (Prinse Amelia 1874), 16-19 (Prinses Amelia)-28 (Borneo) guns, crew as Prinses Amelia numbering 178 (1874)-207 men, maximum speed under steam 6-7knots and a horsepower of 150 hp. Armament as the Prinses Amelia consisted on gun deck of 12 long 30pd gun no. 2, 4-heavy 2”grenade guns no. 2 and on upper deck 1 long 30pd pivot gun no. 2 and at both sides 1 long 30pd gun no. 2. In 1869 8-long 30 pd guns, 4-20” grenade guns and 4-4pd rifled guns. A so-called water-tube boiler with 176 tubes and with a partly telescopic funnel.
2. Flush deck corvette, call sign GQRC, on stocks at the navy yard at Rotterdam, Netherlands on 7 June 1839, launched on 19 June 1845, docked at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands between 18 January-14 April 1853, last mentioned in 1873, dimensions 39,50 x 10,80 x 5,00 metres, 900 tons displacement and an armament of 18-22 guns.

Dutch row gunboat Zr. Ms. No. 1 guard ship at Samarang, Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Nederlandsche Staatscourant dated 1 March 1861

An item dated The Hague, Netherlands 28th February referred to tidings of 15th January dealing with the movements of the Dutch squadron in the Dutch East Indies. The row gunboat Zr. Ms. No. 14 lieutenant 2nd class L.F. Tuckermann served as guard ship in the roads of Samarang, Dutch East Indies.

Dutch schooner brig Zr. Ms. Makasser stationed off Sumatra, Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Nederlandsche Staatscourant dated 1 March 1861

An item dated The Hague, Netherlands 28th February referred to tidings of 15th January dealing with the movements of the Dutch squadron in the Dutch East Indies. The Dutch schooner brig Zr. Ms. Makasser lieutenant 1st class jhr. J.C.H. Clifford Kocq van Breugel stationed at the west coast of Sumatra, Dutch East Indies made a voyage around the north and towards the island Nias and was according to the latest tidings lying in the roads of Padang, Dutch East Indies.(1)

Note
1. Makasar, or Macasser brigantine/schooner brig, call sign GQNK, on stocks at Willemsoord, Netherlands on 18 April 1851, launched in 1853, sold on a public auction by John Price&Co. at 11.00 o’clock on Thursday 31 December 1868 at the naval establishment Onrust, Dutch East Indies, dimensions 28,50 x 8,70 metres, a 252 tons displacement and an armament of 6 guns.

Dutch schooner brig Zr. Ms. Rembang stationed at Borneo, Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Nederlandsche Staatscourant dated 1 March 1861

An item dated The Hague, Netherlands 28th February referred to tidings of 15th January dealing with the movements of the Dutch squadron in the Dutch East Indies. The Dutch schooner brig Zr. Ms. Rembang lieutenant 1st class F.J. Abresch stationed in the Southern and Eastern department of Borneo in the Koetei river, Dutch East Indies was according to the latest tidings lying in the roads of Samarinde, Dutch East Indies.(1)

Note
1. Brigantine, on stocks at navy yard at Rotterdam, Netherlands 20 November 1848, launched 12 April 1850, rebuilt in Dutch East Indies as floating battery in 1858 ?, sold on a public auction by John Pryce&Co., at the naval establishment at Onrust, Dutch East Indies at 09.00 o’clock on Monday 21 October 1861, dimensions 28,50 x 8,70 x 3,30 metres, 252 tons displacement and an armament of 6 guns.

American battleship USS Washington (BB-47) 1919-1924



Library off Congress. Original link

Library off Congress. Original link

U.S. Navy. Original link

Library of Congress. Original link

Nav Source. Original link

Laid down by the New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Camden, New Jersey, USA on 30 June 1919, launched by Jean Summers on 1 September 1921, building stopped on 8 February 1922 as a result of the Washington Naval treaty and sunk by the USS New York and Texas while used as a gunnery target on 26 November 1924.

Of the Colorado-class consisting of the Colorado, Maryland, West Virginia and Washington preceded by the Tennessee-class and succeeded by the South Dakota and North Carolina-classes. General technical specifications of this class. Displacement 32.600 long tons and as dimensions 190,27 x 29,67 x 12 metres or 624.3 x 97.4 x 38 feet. Turbo-electric transmission consisting of 4-5,424kW electric motors driven by 2-2 phase turbo generators and 8 oil-fired Babcock&Wilcox water tube boilers supplying via 4 screw shafts totally 28.900 ehp allowing a speed of 21 knots. With the maximum oil bunker capacity of 4.570 tons was the range 8.000 nautical miles with a speed of 10 knots. Crew numbered 1.080 men. The armour consisted of a 20,3-34,3cm/8-13.5” thick belt, 8,9cm/3.5” thick decks with the barbettes, gun turrets and conning tower protected by respectively 33cm/13”, 12,7cm/5” (top)-22,9cm/9” (rear)-22,9/25,4cm or 9-10” (sides)-45,7cm/18” (front) and 292cm/11.5”. Original armament consisted of 4x2-41cm/16” 45 Mark 5 guns, 12/14-12,7cm/5” /51 guns, 4-7,6cm/3” guns, 2-21” torpedo tubes deck mounted; later increased with anti aircraft guns. The Colorado-class battleships were the last battleships built for the US Navy with 4 gun turrets.

American battleship USS Colorado (BB-45) 1919-1959


Laid down by the New York Shipbuilding Corporation on 29 May 1919, launched by Mrs. Max Melville on 22 March 1921, commissioned on 30 August 1923, overhauled 1928-1929, refitted at the Puget Sound Navy Yard 25 June1941-31 March 1942, decommissioned at Pearl Harbor on 7 January 1947, stricken on 1 March 1959 and sold to be broken up on 23 July 1959. Nicknamed Buckin Bronco,

Of the Colorado-class consisting of the Colorado, Maryland, West Virginia and Washington preceded by the Tennessee-class and succeeded by the South Dakota and North Carolina-classes. General technical specifications of this class. Displacement 32.600 long tons and as dimensions 190,27 (over all) x 29,67 x 12 metres or 624.3 x 97.4 x 38 feet. Displacement of the Colorado 32.600/32.100 long tons *design)-33.590 tons/33.060 long tons (full load). Turbo-electric transmission consisting of 4-5,424kW electric motors driven by 2-2 phase turbo generators and 8 oil-fired Babcock&Wilcox water tube boilers supplying via 4 screw shafts totally 28.900 ehp allowing a speed of 21 knots. With the maximum oil bunker capacity of 4.570 tons was the range 8.000 nautical miles with a speed of 10 knots. Crew numbered 1.080 men. The armour consisted of a 20,3-34,3cm/8-13.5” thick belt, 8,9cm/3.5” thick decks with the barbettes, gun turrets and conning tower protected by respectively 33cm/13”, 12,7cm/5” (top)-22,9cm/9” (rear)-22,9/25,4cm or 9-10” (sides)-45,7cm/18” (front) and 292cm/11.5”. Original armament consisted of 4x2-41cm/16” 45 Mark 5 guns, 12/14-12,7cm/5” /51 guns, 4-7,6cm/3”guns, 2-21” torpedo tubes deck mounted; later increased with anti aircraft guns. The Colorado-class battleships were the last battleships built for the US Navy with 4 gun turrets.

New design for French submarines according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1905-1906 no.8

An item referred to the magazine Le Yacht reporting that the new planned French submarines were to have a displacement of 398 ton and as dimensions 51 x 5 x 3,13 metres. Maximum horsepower supplied by the steam drive machinery was 700 hp allowing via 2 screws a maximum speed of 12 miles. The crews numbered 24 men (included 2 officers). The armament consisted of 7 torpedo tubes. As a result of the increased displacement was the crew accommodation improved and the range increased. For the moment being were 18 of this submarines planned.

Sweden interested in submarine invented by Erik Lind according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1905-1906 no.8

An item referred to the magazine Le Yacht reported that the Swedish government was negotiating with the inventor Erik Lind over buying a new kind of submarine.

Brazil asked American shipyard Cramp&Co. for tenders for building battleships according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1905-1906 no.8

An item reported that the Brazilian cabinet asked the shipyard of Cramp&Co., Philadelphia, USA for bids for designing and building costs of 3 battleships.

French submarine Omega launched at Toulon, France according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1905-1906 no.8

An item referred to the magazine Le Yacht reported that the French submarine Omega was launched at Toulon, France. With a displacement of 301 ton and as dimensions 301 ton and as dimensions 48,9 x 4.20 x 2,76 metres. Maximum horsepower 330hp allowing a speed of 11 miles. The armament consisted of 4 torpedo tubes.(1)

Note
1. Laid down on 26 January 1903, launched on 28 November 1905, commissioned on 21 January 1911, decommissioned on 20 May 1919 and sold on 17 October 1919 at Toulon, France to M. Jacquard.

French capital warships fitted out with course controlled torpedoes according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1905-1906 no. 5

An item referred to the magazine Le Yacht reporting that the French 1st class warships also were fitted out with torpedoes with course controller with until then and since a long term just the torpedo boats were fitted. The war torpedoes on board of the battleships of the Mediterranean squadron were after their return destined for use on board of submarines.

Saturday, 13 February 2016

American dreadnought battleship USS Delaware (BB-28) 1907-1924


Of the Delaware-class, preceded by the South Carolina-class and succeeded by the Florida-class. Laid down by Newport New Shipbuilding, Newport News, USA on 11 November 1907, launched on 6 February 1909, commissioned on 4 April 1910, decommissioned caused by the Washington Naval Treaty at the Boston Navy Yard on 10 November 1923, disarmed and sold to be broken up on 5 February 1924.

Part of the Delaware-class consisting of the Delaware and North Dakota preceded by the South Carolina-class and succeeded by the Florida-class. General specifications of this class. With a displacement of 20.380 (standard)-22.440 (mean war service) tons and as dimensions 158 x 26,01 x 8,31 metres or 519 x 85.4 x 27.3 feet. The two shaft vertical triple expansion engines and 14 Babcock&Wilcox boilers provided a horsepower of 25.000 shp allowed a speed of 21 knots and with a speed of 10 knots and the coal bunker capacity of 1.000-2.500 tons a range of 6.000 nautical miles. The crew numbered 933 men. The armour consisted of a 22,9-27,9cm/9-11” thick belt, 5,1cm/2” thick decks with the lower casemate, upper casemate, barbettes, turrets (face) and conning tower protected by respectively 20,3-25,4cm/8-10”, 12,7cm/5”, 10,2-25,4cm/4-10”/30,5cm/12” and 29,2cm/11.5” thick armour. The original armament consisted of 5x2-30,5cm/12“ L/45 Mark guns, 14x1-5” L/5- guns and 2-53cm/21” torpedo tubes below the waterline.

American dreadnought battleship USS North Dakota (BB-29) 1907-1931


Of the Delaware-class, preceded by the South Carolina-class and succeeded by the Florida-class. Building ordered on 2 March 1907, laid down at the Fore River Shipyard, Quincy Point, Massachusetts, USA on 16 December 1907, launched on 10 November 1909, baptized by Mary Benton, commissioned on 11 April 1910, decommissioned on 22 November 1923, disarmed and reclassified as unclassified ship n 29 May 1924, converted into a radio-controlled target ship, replaced by USS Utah in 1931, stricken on 7 January 1931 and sold to the Union Shipbuilding Company, Baltimore, USA be broken up on 16 March 1931.

Part of the Delaware-class consisting of the Delaware and North Dakota, preceded by the South Carolina-class and succeeded by the Florida-class. General specifications of this class. With a displacement of 20.380 (standard)-22.440 (mean war service) tons and as dimensions 158 x 26,01 x 8,31 metres or 519 x 85.4 x 27.3 feet. The 2 shaft Curtiss steam turbines and 14 Babcock&Wilcox boilers provided a horsepower of 25.000 shp allowed a speed of 21 knots and with a speed of 10 knots and the coal bunker capacity of 1.000-2.500 tons a range of 6.000 nautical miles. The crew numbered 933 men. The armour consisted of a 22,9-27,9cm/9-11” thick belt, 5,1cm/2” thick decks with the lower casemate, upper casemate, barbettes, turrets (face) and conning tower protected by respectively 20,3-25,4cm/8-10”, 12,7cm/5”, 10,2-25,4cm/4-10”/30,5cm/12” and 29,2cm/11.5” thick armour. The original armament consisted of 5x2-30,5cm/12“ L/45 Mark guns, 14x1-12,7cm/5”L/5- guns and 2-53cm/21” torpedo tubes below the waterline.

Dutch minister of navy ordered to transfer sailors from guard ship Zr. Ms. Zeeland to crew the transport Zr Ms. Flora in 1818

In his letter dated 29 April 1818 ordered the Dutch minister of navy that the transport Flora (1) destined with victuals for the Mediterranean squadron was to be manned with men from the guard ship Zr. Ms. Zeeland.(2) Captain lieutenant J.J. Dingemans (3) was to command her. The crew numbered 32 men including Dingemans, 2 lieutenants, 2 midshipmen, one victuals master and 26 sailors.

Notes
1. First mentioned 1818, sold to be broken up in1822, an armament of 6 guns and a crew numbering 32 men.
2. 3rd charter, ex-Doggersbank, department Rotterdam, on stocks at naval yard at Rotterdam, Netherlands by P. Glavimans on 9 October 1797, launched on 3 March 1798, coppered in 1798, decommissioned and became accommodation ship for the marines at Willemsoord, Netherland in 1807, coppered 1811, renamed Zeeland in 1814, guard ship in 1815, sold at Nieuwediep for ƒ 14.300,00 to be broken up in 1839, dimensions 180 x 48 x 21½ feet and an armament of 68 guns.
3. Jan Justus Dingemans (23 January 1771) died on 16 Augustus 1822 in the same rank at that moment commanding officer of the brig Zr. Ms. Kemphaan at Curacao. Served also in the Batavian navy and French navy. Buried with military honours.

Source
Archive Marine Etablissement Vlissingen (Rijkarchief Zeeland, Middelburg, Netherlands) 95.16.

Dutch bark de Vrij Gebroeders released from quarantine at Vlissingen, Netherlands in April 1818

A letter of the Dutch minister of navy dated 5 April 1818 ordered to release the Dutch bark ship de Vijf Gebroeders from the quarantine at Vlissingen, Netherlands. She was loaded with rice, indigo and tobacco underway from Charleston, USA towards Antwerp, Belgium.

Source
Archive Marine Etablissement Vlissingen (Rijkarchief Zeeland, Middelburg, Netherlands) 95.16.

Tristan da Cunha supplied good shelter for ships underway towards the East Indies according to the Dutch minister of navy in 1818

Rijksmuseum Amsterdam, Netherlands model NG-MC-336-1. Original link

On 24 March 1818 wrote the Dutch minister of navy that the island Tristan da Cunha supplied an excellent shelter for ships underway towards the East Indies. This conclusion was based on a report of captain lieutenant Van Schuler (1) of the Dutch corvette Zr. Ms. Venus (2) who wrote that the island supplied an excellent stop for taking in fresh water. At the north side of Tristan da Cunha was a very well anchorage available protecting against all winds except for the northern wind. However there were seldom northern winds blowing and is so just in the months April-June and not in the resting nine months. Thanks to the very fertile soil was it also possible to acquire victuals from the local population.

Notes
1. Barend Wilhelm Adolph van Schuler (18 December 1776, Utrecht, Netherlands-27 February 1824, Batavia, Dutch East Indies, married to jonkvrouwe Andrea Elisabeth Strick van Linschooten. Van Schuler was in the Dutch East Indies commanding officer and director of the colonial navy.
2. Of the Department Amsterdam, on stocks at navy yard at Amsterdam, Netherlands by P. Schuijt jr. on 2 January 1806, launched on 2 May 1807, broken up in 1823, dimensions 120 (prow) x 33 9/11 x 16 8/11 feet and an armament of 20 guns.  In a Dutch book written by D.H. Kolff published in 1828 dealing with the voyage of the Venus was stated that for instance an abundance of very good potatoes was available. She left on 28 January 1817 Willemsoord, Netherlands towards Batavia, Dutch East Indies. In April arrived the Venus at Tristan da Cunha. At that moment were there 74 men commanded by a certain colonel Cloete stationed by the British government who ordered that a large numbers of women of Cape of Good Hope, South Africa was to come to the island.

Source
Archive Marine Etablissement Vlissingen (Rijkarchief Zeeland, Middelburg, Netherlands) 95.16.

Russian armoured cruiser Rurik 1905-1930


Ordered via mediation of the fnotorious arms dealer Basil Zaharoff. Designed by naval engineers KA Tennison [Tennyson] and A.P Titov. Laid down at Vickers, Barrow in Furness, England on 9/22 August 1905. Launched on 4 November 1906, during the First World War acting as flagship of the Baltic Fleet and on several occasion damaged by mines, worn out in 1918, hulked in 1922 and sold to be broken up in 1930. The intention to built two more of this design were cancelled after the British battle cruiser HMS Tiger entered the scene.

Displacement of 15.170 tons and as dimensions 161 x 22,9 x 7,9 metres or 529 x 75 x 26 feet. The 2-shaft 2 4-cylinder vertical triple expansion steam engines and 28 Bellville coal-fired boilers supplied 20.580 (trial)-20.675 ship allowing a speed of 21-21,43 (trials at the Skelmorlie mile) knots. Coal bunker capacity was 1.920 ton. Her crew numbered 899 men. The armament consisted of 2x2-25,4cm/10” guns, 4x2-20cm/8” guns, 20x1-4,7cm/1.9” guns and 2-45,7cm/18” torpedo tubes. At Kronstadt, Russia were after her delivery by Vickers the gun turrets and barbettes improved after it occurred that during the trials firing caused deformation. The armour was Krupp steel made by Vickers and consisted of a 15cm/6” (maximum) thick belt, 3,8cm/1.5” thick deck with the conning tower, gun turrets, barbettes and casemates protected by respectively 20cm/8”, 18-20cmM/7-8”, 15cm-20cm,/6-7” and 7,6cmM/3”. To protect the magazines was an advance sprinkler system available.

1. Zacharias Basileios Zacharoff (6 October 1849 Mugla, Ottoman Empire-27 November 1936 Monte Carlo, Monaco), was also affiliated to the British firm Vickers.

Russian pre dreadnought battleship Tri Sviatitelia 1891-1925

Improved and enlarged Navarin design. Building started in January 1891, officially laid down at the Nikolayev Dockyard on 15 August 1891, launched on 12 November 1893, completed at Sevastopol in 1896, commissioned in the Black Sea Fleet in 1895, sea trials in September-October 1896, modernized November 1911-August 1912, when the February Revolution broke out was she lying at Sevastopol to be refitted, captured at Sevastopol by German forces in May 1918, handed over to the Allied forces after the Armistice in November 1918, when the British forces evacuated the town were her engines destroyed to make her useless for the Bolsheviks in their struggle with the White Russian forces. Left behind when the White Russian left yhe Crimea in 1920, broken up in 1923 although nor earlier stricken from the Navy list as on 21 November 1925. During the First World War she was involved in bombardments of the Turkish coast and in twice occasions she met the Turkish battle cruiser Yavuz Sultan Selim (1) although without results at both sides.

Former German SB Goeben, the later Turkish Yavuz Sultan Selim

Displacement 12.680/12.480 long tons (design)-13.532 tons/13.318 long tons and as dimension 113,1 (waterline)-115,2 (over all) x 22,3 x 8,7 x 1,5 (metacentric height) metres or 371-378 x 73.3 x 28.6 x 5.58 feet. The 2-3 cylinder vertical triple expansion steam engines of the British company Humphreys&Tennant and 14 cylindrical coal-fired boilers supplied via 2 shafts 10.600 ihp (design)-11.308 (ihp). Speed 16 (after 1911 modernisation) 16,4 (trials-maximum) knots. With a maximum coal bunker capacity of 1.000 tons was her range with a speed of 10 knots 2.250 nautical miles. The three dynamos were unable to deliver at the same time the by the electric equipment needed full power. The armament consisted of 2x2-30,5cm/12” Obukhov Model 1894 /40 guns, 8x1-15,2cm/6” Canet Pattern 1892 /45 guns in casemates situated on the upper deck, against torpedo boats were available a mixture consisting of 4x1-11,9cm/4.7” Canet Pattern 1892 /45guns, 10x1-4,7cm/1.9” Hotchkiss guns, 40x1-3,7cm/1.5”  Hotchkiss guns and 6x1-38,1cm/15” torpedo tubes.(2 forward broadsides submerges, 4 surfaced, 2x1 broadsides, 1 bow, 1 stern). The Harvey armour was manufactured by the British company Vickers and the French companies Schneider et Cie and Saint Charmond and consisted of a 40,6/16”-45,7cm/18” abreast the magazines covering 75,0 metres/246 of the hull with a height of 2,4metres/8’at the bottom still 22,9cm/9” thick and. Due to her overweight was the belt mainly below the waterline instead of the planned 45,72cm/18”. Furthermore were 35,6-40,6cm/14-16” thick transverse bulkheads placed. The nickel steel made armour deck was 5,1cm/2” thick over the lower casemate but forward and aft of the main belt towards the stern and bow increased the thickness to 7,6cm/3”. The sides of the gun turrets and conning tower were protected by respectively 40,6cm/16” and 30,5cm/12”, the lower casemate of 66,4cm/21‘ x 8‘(height) was protected at the ends by 16“ thick transverse bulkheads and with 16“ thick sides. The upper casemate had sides of 12,7cm/5” thick armour and was to protected the 15,2cm/6” guns.

Note
1. SMS Goeben of the Moltke-class battle cruisers. Sister ship Moltke. Building ordered on 8 April 1909, laid down at the shipyard of Blohm&Voss, Hamburg, Germany on 28 August 1909, launched on 28 March 1911, commissioned on 2 July 1912, handed over to the Turkish government on 16 August 1914, renamed Yavuz Sultan Selim and commissioned in the Turkish navy. Decommissioned on 20 December 1950, renamed Yavuz in 1935, stricken on 14 November 1954 and finally broken up in 1973. Main armament consisted of 5x2-28cm/11” guns.

Russian pre dreadnought battleship Slava 1900-1917


Of the Borodino-class. Building ordered on 30 January 1900, laid down at the Baltic Shipyard, Saint Petersburg, Russia on 1 November 1902, launched on 29 August 1930, commissioned in October 1905, participated no in the Russo-Japanese war due to her too late delivery, used as training ship for new officers after 1906, added to the Baltic Fleet after 1910, grounded in the Moon Sound Strait near the island of Muhu while she -being heavily damaged by the German SMS König (1)- could not escape from the German naval forces and sunk by Russian destroyers on 17 October 1917, stricken from the Navy List on 29 May 1918 and broken up by Estonian inhabitants in 1935.

Displacement 13.733 tons/13.516 long tons (design)-14.646/14.415 (normal ) tons and as dimensions 118,69 (waterline)-121,1 (over all) x 23,2 x 8,9 metres or 389.5-397.3 x 76.1 x 20.2 feet. The 2-4cylinder vertical triple expansion steam engines and 20 Belleville water tube boilers, all made by Baltic Works, supplied via 2 screws 15.800 ihp (design)-16.378 ihp (trials) allowing a maximum speed of 17,64 knots (trials). With the maximum coal bunker capacity at full load of 1.372 tons/1.350 long tons and a speed of 10 knots was her range 2.590 nautical miles. Her crew numbered 846 men. The original armament consisted of 2x2-30,5cm/12” guns with 60 rounds each gun, 6x2-15,2cn/6” guns with 180 rounds each gun, 20x1-7,5cm/3.0” guns with 300 rounds each gun, 4x1-4,7cm/1.9” Hotchkiss saluting guns and 4-38,1cm/15” torpedo tubes (1x bow, 1xstern both surfaced, 2x1 broadsides submerged) for which 12 torpedoes were taken with her. Originally was the number of 4,7cm guns much more but before completion already removed. In the First World War was her armament changed with reducing the number of 7,5cm guns to 12 and adding anti aircraft guns, in begin 1917 numbering 4-7,6cm/3” guns.

Note
1. Dreadnought laid down at the Kaiserliche Werf, Wilhelmshaven. Germany in October 1911, with a displacement of 28.600 tons (full load) and a main armament of 5x2-30,5/12” cm guns and 14-15cm/5.9” guns. The Slava was lost during Operation Albion in September-October 1917 when Germany invaded the West Estonian Archipelago and trying to eliminate the Russian naval forces in the Bay of Riga.

Japanese navy ordered building of very small torpedo boats according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1906-1907 no. 7

An item reported that for the Japanese navy some very small torpedo boats were built with a displacement of 14,45 tons and as dimensions 17,1 x 2,85 x 1,58 metres. Trial speed 19,25 miles. Fitted out with a Yarrow boiler. The armament consisted of 1-4,7cm gun and at both sides 1-35,5cm torpedo launcher.

French minister of navy stated that fitting out battleships with turbines would delay their building according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1906-1907 no. 7

An item referred to a statement of the French minister of navy Thomson (1) who stated for the Navy Commission of the parliament during the budget discussions for 1906 that 3 of the six battleships allowed to built that year were to be fitted out with turbine machinery despite it would delay the building.

Note
1. Gaston Thomson (29 January 1848 Oran, French Algeria-14 May 1932, Bône, Algeria), minister of navy 24 January 1905-22 October 1908.

Chinese gunboat Chu Tai built at Kobe, Japan according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1906-1907 no. 7

An item reported the launching at the Kawasaki shipyard, Kobe, Japan of the Chinese gunboat Tchore-Tai with a displacement of 552 tons and as dimensions 61 x 9 x 2,50 metres. Speed 12 miles. The armament consisted of 2-12cm guns, 2-7,6cm guns and 4 machineguns. Five more gunboats were being built.(1)

Note
1. This must be the Chu-class gunboats of which the first - Chu Tung- was launched on 12 June 1906 and the Chu Tai on 25 September 1906.

British admiral E.R. Fremantle against further increasing warships according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1906-1907 no. 6

An item reported that the British admiral sir E.R. Freemantle (1) agreed with the protest of captain Mahan (2) against the building of larger warships. Although the very large ships had more combat value as their predecessors were they in his opinion for several task useless. Further more was one big ship of hardly value if the homogeneity of the battle fleet was disturbed.

Notes
1. Edmund Robert Fremantle and not Freemantle (15 June 1835-10 February 1929).
2 This must be Alfred Thayer Mahan (27 September 1840 West Point, New York, USA-1 December 1914 Washington, D.C., USA), who served in the US Navy and after his retirement promoted to the rank of rear admiral, famous for his book The Influence of Sea Power Upon History 1660-1783, published in 1890. The book had a considerable impact.

German parliament approved extra building of large cruisers according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1906-1907 no. 6

An item reported that with large majority the German Reichstag approved the building of another 6 large cruisers above the 14 approved by the fleet program 1906. Building costs of each cruiser was 34.500.000 mark.

Friday, 12 February 2016

British river gunboat HMS Widgeon (1904) in 1923

Launched in 1904, completed in 1904, displacement 180 ton, horsepower 670 h, coal-fired reciprocating machinery and an armament of 2-6pd guns and 4 machineguns.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands)  inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

British river gunboat HMS Tarantula (1916) in 1923

A so-called large China gunboat. Completed in 1916, displacement 645 ton, horsepower 2.000 hp, coal and oil-fired reciprocating machinery and an armament of 2-6” guns, 1-3” anti aircraft gun, 1-2pd gun and 8 machineguns.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands)  inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

British river gunboat HMS Scarab (1915) in 1923

A so-called large China gunboat. Completed in 1915, displacement 645 ton, horsepower 2.000 hp, coal and oil-fired reciprocating machinery and an armament of 2-6” guns, 1-3” anti aircraft gun, 1-2pd gun and 8 machineguns.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands)  inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

British river gunboat HMS Moth (1916) in 1923

A so-called large China gunboat. Completed in 1916, displacement 645 ton, horsepower 2.000 hp, coal and oil-fired reciprocating machinery and an armament of 2-6” guns, 1-3” anti aircraft gun, 1-2pd gun and 8 machineguns.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands)  inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

British river gunboat HMS Mantis (1915) in 1923

A so-called large China gunboat. Launched in 1915, completed in 1915, displacement 645 ton, horsepower 2.000 hp, coal and oil-fired reciprocating machinery and an armament of 2-6” guns, 1-3” anti aircraft gun, 1-2pd gun and 8 machineguns.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands)  inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

British river gunboat HMS Ladybird (1916) in 1923

A so-called large China gunboat. Completed in 1916, displacement 645 ton, horsepower 2.000 hp, coal and oil-fired reciprocating machinery and an armament of 2-6” guns, 1-12 pd gun and 6 machineguns.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands)  inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

British river gunboat HMS Gnat (1915) in 1923

A so-called large China gunboat. Completed in 1915, displacement 645 ton, horsepower 2.000 hp, coal and oil-fired reciprocating machinery and an armament of 2-6” guns, 1-3” anti aircraft gun, 1-2pd gun and 8 machineguns.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands)  inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

British river gunboat HMS Glowworm (1916) in 1923

A so-called large China gunboat. Launched in 1916, completed in 1916, displacement 645 ton, horsepower 2.000 hp, coal and oil-fired reciprocating machinery and an armament of 2-6” guns, 1-3” anti aircraft gun, 1-2pd gun and 8 machineguns.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands)  inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

British river gunboat HMS Cricket (1915) in 1923

A so-called large China gunboat. Launched in 1915, completed in 1916, displacement 645 ton, horsepower 2.000 hp, coal and oil-fired reciprocating machinery and an armament of 2-6” guns, 1-3” anti aircraft gun, 1-2pd gun and 8 machineguns.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands)  inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

British river gunboat HMS Cockchafer (1915) in 1923

A so-called large China gunboat. Launched in 1915, completed in 1916, displacement 645 ton, horsepower 2.000 hp, coal and oil-fired reciprocating machinery and an armament of 2-6” guns, 1-3” anti aircraft gun, 1-2pd gun and 8 machineguns.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands)  inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

British river gunboat HMS Cicala (1915) in 1923

A so-called large China gunboat. Launched in 1915, completed in 1916, displacement 645 ton, horsepower 2.000 hp, coal and oil-fired reciprocating machinery and an armament of 2-6” guns, 1-3” anti aircraft gun, 1-2pd gun and 8 machineguns.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands)  inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

British river gunboat HMS Bee (1916) in 1923

A so-called large China gunboat. Completed in 1916, displacement 645 ton, horsepower 2.000 hp, coal and oil-fired reciprocating machinery and an armament of 1-6” gun, 1-3” anti aircraft gun, 1-2pd gun and 8 machineguns.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands)  inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

British river gunboat HMS Apis (1915) in 1923

A so-called large China gunboat. Completed in 1915, displacement 645 ton, horsepower 2.000 hp, coal and oil-fired reciprocating machinery and an armament of 2-6” guns, 1-12pd gun, 1-2pd gun and 6 machineguns.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands)  inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

Singapore-flagged containership (ex- Anne Schulte 2001, P&O Nedlloyd Rose 2001, P&O Nedlloyd Andes 2001-2005, Anne Schulte 2005-2016?) Maersk Newcastle 2001-

Singapore-flagged, IMO 9215878, MMSI 56346000 and call sign 9Vs533. 

Built by Hyundai Heavy Industries, Ulsan, South Korea in 2001. As the Anna Schulte Hong Kong/China-flagged and homeport Hong Kong. Owned and managed by BSM Cyprus, Limassol, Cyprus. Ex- Anne Schulte renamed January 2001, P&O Nedlloyd Rose renamed March 2001 and P&O Nedlloyd Andes renamed November 2005. Renamed Maersk Newcastle in 2016?

Norwegian shuttle tanker Anneleen Knutsen 2002-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 7 February 2016

Norway-flagged, homeport Haugesund, Norway, IMO 9176929, MMSI 257983000 and call sign LAUN5. Built by Naval Gijon, Gijon, Spain in2002. Owned by Knutsen Shuttle Tankers and managed by Knot Management, both of Haugesund, Norway.

Armament of Dutch advice vessels in 1818

The Dutch minister of navy ordered in his letter dated 15 April 1818 that the armament of the advice vessels consisted of 8-8pd guns and a crew numbering 50 men. Rigging in British manner.

Source
Archive Dutch navy yard at Vlissingen, Netherlands (Zeeuws Archief, Middelburg) 95.16.

Armament of Dutch brigs in 1818

Rijksmuseum Amsterdam, Netherlands. Original link

The Dutch minister of navy ordered in his letter dated 15 April 1818 that the armament of the brigs consisted of 18-30pd carronades with a crew numbering 100 men. Rigging in British manner. (1)

Note
1. The Zwaluw, Kemphaan, Valk, Echo, Pegasus, Merkuur and Venus.

Source
Archive Dutch navy yard at Vlissingen, Netherlands (Zeeuws Archief, Middelburg) 95.16.

Armament of Dutch bomb corvettes in 1818

Rijksmuseum Amsterdam, Netherlands. Original link

The Dutch minister of navy ordered in his letter dated 15 April 1818 that the armament of the these corvettes consisted standard of 20-30pd carronades. When used for the design tasks then armed with 2-12” mortars, 20-12pd carronades and 2-8pd guns. The crew numbered 120 men excluded the marines or artillerists needed to man the mortars.(1)

Note
1. Proserpina, Department Rotterdam, building ordered decision dated 15 April 1818 number 6, on stocks as the Proserpina at navy yard at Rotterdam, Netherlands by P.Glavimans Jz.20 May 1818, launched 11 October 1821, coppered in 1821, docked at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands 18-23 August 1824 commissioned on 1 September 1824 (ordered on 26 August 1824 number 29), to extend the copper, docked again at Hellevoetsluis since 25 November 1828 for repairs, stricken in 1835, sold in 1836 and became a whaler, dimensions 36,23 (load line) x 10,06 (inner hull) x ,25 (fore)-4,81 (aft) x 5,25 (depth below maindeck) and an armament of 2-29”mortars, 20-12pd carronades, 2-6pd guns. If these corvettes were not fitted out with mortars consisted the armament of 20-30pd carronades and 2-6pd guns.
Hekla, building ordered on 15 April 1818 no. 6, order dated 29 May 1818 no. 9 called Hekla, on stocks at Rotterdam, Netherlands by P. Glavimans January 1819, launched 11 October 1821, commissioned 16 March 1822, decommissioned 10 August 1825, commissioned 15 February 1826, decommissioned 31 December 1829, stricken and sold at Vlissingen to J.F.C. Retsin 1830, broken up 1830-1831, dimensions 36,23 (between perpendiculars) x 1,06 x 4,53 (middle) x 5,25 (hold), 20-22 guns (20-30pd carronades, 2-6pd guns) and a crew numbering 150 men.
Medusa, on stocks at the navy yard at Rotterdam, Netherlands in 1825 by P.Glavimans Jz.20, launched 1827, stricken 1835, sold and broken up at Vlissingen in 1836, dimensions 36,23 (load line) x 10,06 (inner hull) x ,25 (fore)-4,81 (aft) x 5,25 (depth below maindeck) and an armament of 2-29”mortars, 20-12pd carronades, 2-6pd guns. If these corvettes were not fitted out with mortars consisted the armament of 20-30pd carronades and 2-6pd guns.

Source
Archive Dutch navy yard at Vlissingen, Netherlands (Zeeuws Archief, Middelburg) 95.16.

Armament of Dutch corvettes in 1818

Model NG-MC-339 of the Komeet, Rijksmuseum Amsterdam, Netherlands. Original link 

The Dutch minister of navy ordered in his letter dated 15 April 1818 that the armament of the corvettes with quarter deck and poop (1) consisted of 28-30pd carronades and of flush decked corvettes of 20-30pd carronades and a crew numbering 120 men. Rigging in British manner.

Note
1. Komeet, also called Comeet, ‘kuil’corvette, Department Rotterdam, on stocks at navy yard at Rotterdam, Netherlands by P. Glavimans Jz. in February or on 4 March 1817, launched 28 November 1818, docked and coppered at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands 22 May-7 June 1819, served also in the Dutch West and East Indies, nearly captured at Antwerp, Belgium when a sudden wind pushed her to the quay 19 December 1831, condemned, auction at the navy yard at Vlissingen, Netherlands on at 12.45 o’clock Thursday 22 September 1836, dimensions 130 x 34 1/11 x 17 8/11 (hold) feet  and an armament of 28 guns

Source
Archive Dutch navy yard at Vlissingen, Netherlands (Zeeuws Archief, Middelburg) 95.16.

Armament of Dutch 44 gun-frigates in 1818

The Dutch minister of navy ordered in his letter dated 15 April 1818 that the armament of the 44-gun frigates consisted of 28-18pd guns, 18-23pd carronades and 2-12pd guns. Crew numbered 350 men. Rigging in British manner.

Source
Archive Dutch navy yard at Vlissingen, Netherlands (Zeeuws Archief, Middelburg) 95.16.

Armament of Dutch 74-gun ships of the line in 1818

The Dutch minister of navy ordered in his letter dated 15 April 1818 that the armament of the 74-gun ships of the line of French design until waterline and further designed by the combined Dutch shipbuilders consisted of 28-36pd guns lower deck, 30-18pd guns upper deck, 16-36pd carronades quarter deck and 2-12pd guns for chasing purposes on the poop. Crew numbered 650 men. Rigging in British manner.(1)

Note
1. Nassau, ship of the line 2nd class, ex-Charlemagne renamed royal order 15 July 1815 no. 55 and minister decision dated 24 July no. 27/500, on stocks at the navy yard at Antwerp, Belgium 1804, launched April 1807, according to treaty handed over to the Netherlands in 1814, departed to the Dutch East Indies on 31 March 1816, rerigged as 32-gun 6th rate 1820, transferred to the Colonial Navy 31 December 1818, broken up 1823, dimensions 54,16 (between perpendiculars) x 14,70 x 6,46 (fore)-7,12 (aft) metres, a displacement of 3.000 tons, sail area 2.327 square metres, an armament of 74 guns and a crew numbering 650 men.

Source
Archive Dutch navy yard at Vlissingen, Netherlands (Zeeuws Archief, Middelburg) 95.16.

Armament of Dutch 84-gun ships of the line in 1818

The Dutch minister of navy ordered in his letter dated 15 April 1818 that the armament of the 84-gun ships of the line of French design like the Prins van Oranje consisted of 32036 pd guns lower deck, 32-24pd guns upper deck, 16-36pd carronades quarter deck and on the poop 8-36pd carronades and 2-12pd guns for chasing purposes. The crew numbered 700 men. Rigging in British manner.

Note
1. Ship of the line 1st charter Prins van Oranje, ex-Illustre, ex-Auguste renamed by royal decision no. 34 dated 27 July 1815, on stocks at Antwerp, Belgium in 1807, launched in April 1811, transferred to the Netherlands according to the Treaty of 1814, sold to be broken up in 1825, dimensions 57,7 x 14,9 x 6,93m, and draught 6,46 (fore)-7,12 (aft) metres, sail area 2.327m2, measurement 3245 tons, armament of 80 guns and a crew numbering 700 men.

Source
Archive Dutch navy yard at Vlissingen, Netherlands (Zeeuws Archief, Middelburg) 95.16.

Flag Kingdom of Sardinia


New flag dated November 1817, photo of an original drawing in the archive of the navy yard at Vlissingen, Netherlands 95.15

British river gunboat HMS Sedgefly (1916) in 1923

A so-called small China gunboat. Completed in, 1916, displacement 98ton and 175 hp coal and oil-fired reciprocating machinery

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands)  inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

British river gunboat HMS Blackfly (1916) in 1923

A so-called small China gunboat. Completed in 1916, displacement 98ton and 175 hp coal and oil-fired reciprocating machinery

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands)  inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

British river gunboat HMS Grayfly (1915) in 1923

A so-called small China gunboat. Completed in 1915, displacement 98ton and 175 hp coal and oil-fired reciprocating machinery

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands)  inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

British river gunboat HMS Gadfly (1915) in 1923

A so-called small China gunboat. Completed in 1915, displacement 98ton and 175 hp coal and oil-fired reciprocating machinery

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands)  inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

American river gunboat USS Palos (1914) in 1923

Launched in 1914, completed in 1914, displacement 190 ton, horsepower 800 hp, coal-fired  reciprocating machinery and an armament of 2-6pd guns.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands)  inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

American river gunboat USS Monocacy (1914) in 1923

Launched in 1914, completed in 1914, displacement 190 ton, horsepower 800 hp, coal-fired  reciprocating machinery and an armament of 2-6pd guns.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands)  inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

Italian river gunboat Ape (1919) in 1923

Launched in 1918, completed in 1919, displacement 30 ton, horsepower 70 hp, oil fired internal combustion machinery and an armament of 1-12pd gun and 10 machineguns.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands)  inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

Italian river gunboat Ermanno Carlotto (1921) in 1923

Launched in 1921, completed in 1921, displacement 220 tons, horsepower 1.100 hp, coal fired reciprocating machinery and an armament of 2-14pd guns.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands)  inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

Italian river gunboat Vespa (1918) in 1923

Launched in 1918, completed in 1919, displacement 30 ton, horsepower 70 hp, oil fired internal combustion machinery and an armament of 1-12pd gun and 10 machineguns.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands)  inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

Italian river gunboat Sebastiano Caboto (1913) in 1923

Launched in 1913, completed in 1913, displacement, 800 tons, horsepower 1.000 hp, coal fired reciprocating machinery and an armament of 6-14pd guns.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands)  inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

Thursday, 11 February 2016

Dutch brig Zr. Ms. Cachelot visiting Japanese ports according to the Dutch newspaper Nederlandsche Staatscourant dated 1 March 1861

Model NG-MC-375, Rijksmuseum Amsterdam, Netherlands. Original link

An item dated The Hague, Netherlands 28th February referred to tidings of 15th January dealing with the movements of the Dutch squadron in the Dutch East Indies.

The brig Zr. Ms. Cachelot captain lieutenant J. van Gogh was on 24th November 1860 in the roads of Nagasaki, Japan with the intention to depart towards Jedo, Japan.(1)

Note
1. Brig 1st class, call sign GQCF, on stocks at navy yard at Vlissingen, Netherlands by A.E. Tromp on 4 September 1844, launched Saturday 28 June 1851, transferred to the Indies Military Navy 1 January 1868, condemned and sold on a public auction at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies for ƒ 8.000 to Mr. Nicolaï on 4 February 1871, dimensions 30,50 (load line between perpendiculars) x 9,50 (inner hull) x 4,0 (fore)-4,3 (aft) x 4,71 (hold) metres, 499,5 tons displacement and an armament of 10-12 (30 pd grenade guns).

Dutch brig 1st class Zr. Ms. Haai lying at Batavia, Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Nederlandsche Staatscourant dated 1 March 1861

An item dated The Hague, Netherlands 28th February referred to tidings of 15th January dealing with the movements of the Dutch squadron in the Dutch East Indies.

The brig Zr. Ms. Haai captain lieutenant jhr. J.E.W.F. van Raders arrived on 4th February 1861 in the roads of Batavia, Dutch East Indies after she was replaced at the station Muntok by the steamship Zr. Ms. Madura.(1)

Note
1. Brig 1st class, on stocks at the navy yard at Rotterdam, Netherlands by Glavimans on 29 October 1838, launched on 11 May 1842, docked at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands 30 December 1842-12 January 1843, 25 October 1849-27 March 1850 and 18-20 February 1851, sold on a public auction at the naval establishment Onrust, Dutch East Indies on 20 June 1861, dimensions 31,50 x 9,5 x 4,50 metres, 546 tons displacement and armament of 18 guns.

Dutch corvette Zr. Ms. Pallas available for active duty in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Nederlandsche Staatscourant dated 1 March 1861

An item dated The Hague, Netherlands 28th February referred to tidings of 15th January dealing with the movements of the Dutch squadron in the Dutch East Indies.

The Dutch corvette Zr. Ms. Pallas captain lieutenant C.L.J. d’Hamecourt was fitted out for service and was to depart on short notice from the roads of Batavia, Dutch East Indies towards the station west coast of Sumatra, Dutch East Indies to replace there the screw steam corvette Zr.Ms. Amelia.(1)

Note
1. Flush deck corvette, call sign GQRC, on stocks at the navy yard at Rotterdam, Netherlands on 7 June 1839, launched on 19 June 1845, docked at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands between 18 January-14 April 1853, last mentioned in 1873, dimensions 39,50 x 10,80 x 5,00 metres, 900 tons displacement and an armament of 18-22 guns.

Dutch corvette 1st class Zr. Ms. Juno guard ship at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Nederlandsche Staatscourant dated 1 March 1861

Model (NG-MC-345) Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, Netherlands. Original link

An item dated The Hague, Netherlands 28th February referred to tidings of 15th January dealing with the movements of the Dutch squadron in the Dutch East Indies.
The Dutch corvette Zr. Ms. Juno captain J.J. van der Moore served as guard ship on the roads of Surabaya, Dutch East Indies.(1)

Note
1. Corvette 1st class, call sign GQLJ, on stocks at the navy yard at Rotterdam, Netherlands by P. Glavimans Jz. on 20 June 1833, launched 14 May 1839, docked at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands 29 March-17 April 1841, part of the Indies Military Navy since1 January 1868, guard ship at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies 18 September 1867-25 January 1870, sold at Surabaya on a public auction to the native Aridin for ƒ 16.700,00 on 2 July, dimensions 39,50 (loadline) x 10,50 (inner hull) x 4,4 (fore)-5,0 9aft) x 5,6 (hold below maindeck) metres, 929 tons displacement, 22 (1869: 14 medium 30pd guns)-32 g(24-12pd guns, 8-30pd carronades, 4-8pd guns) guns and a crew numbering 120 (1869) men.

Dutch frigate 2nd class Zr. Ms. Palembang guard ship at Batavia, Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Nederlandsche Staatscourant dated 1 March 1861

Model Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, Netherlands. Original link

An item dated The Hague, Netherlands 28th February referred to tidings of 15th January dealing with the movements of the Dutch squadron in the Dutch East Indies.
The Dutch frigate Zr. Ms. Palembang captain J.D. Wolterbeek served as guard ship in the roads of Batavia, Dutch East Indies.(1)

Note
1. 2nd class frigate, on stocks at navy yard at Amsterdam, Netherlands by P. Schuijt jr. in February 1822, launched on 28 April 1829, while lying in the roads off Batavia sold on Monday 2 November 1863 at 10.00 o’clock to be broken up, served also in the Dutch East Indies, dimensions 46,21 (load line) x 11,91 (inner hull) x 5,17 (fore)-5,74 (aft) x 6,41 (hold below main deck), displacement 1.422 tons, an armament of 32-44 guns (30 short 30pd guns, 20-30pd guns, 2-8pd guns) and crew numbering 393 men.

German Blohm&Voss shipyard designed battleship for the Royal Netherlands Navy in 1912-1914


In the first part of the 20th Century was the Netherlands Royal Navy interested in obtaining (nine) dreadnoughts mainly for the defence of the Dutch East Indies. While Dutch shipyards were not able at that moment to build such warships were tenders asked from foreign shipyards. Namely the German shipyards Friedrich Krupp Germaniawerft at Kiel, Blohm&Voss at Hamburg, Vulcan Werke at Stettin, Schichau at Danzig, A.G. Weser, at Bremen, the British shipyards of Sir W.G. Armstrong, Elswick, Vickers at London, Beardmore at Glasgow and the Conventry Syndicate/Fairfield Shipbuilding&Co. at London and the Italian shipyards of Stabilimento Technico at Triest and Ansaldo at Sestri Ponente.

The armament was to consist of :
4x2-35.6cm/14” /45 breech loading guns in barbettes placed on the centre line, 4 guns were to fire straight ahead, 4 right astern and 8 on each broadside over the greatest possible sector on each side and for each gun 100 rounds;
16-15cm/6” quick firing /50 in casemates with 250 round for each gun. At least 4 guns were to fire straight ahead and 4 right astern and also a few degrees over the other side of the centre line and
12-7,5cm/3” quick firing guns without gun shields to be used as anti-balloon artillery as far as they were not mounted between decks, for each gun 300 pounds.
4-21” broadside submerged torpedo tubes. The 2 foremost torpedo tubes were to fire 10-15 degrees before the beam, the 2 backward torpedo tubes 10-15 degrees abaft the beam and for each gun 3 torpedoes.

While the Royal Netherlands Navy since decades for the main armament her ships fitted out with Krupp guns which performed always well and was trusted by the Dutch naval personnel was a strong preference for Krupp guns on the battleships to be built.

Main armour belt at least 25cm thick, sloping to the fore and aft ends with the lower limit no rising out of the water with the ship trimmed to trial displacement heeled over an angle of minimum 7 degrees. The 6” gun casemates were to protected by 18cm thick armour, the barbettes and conning tower by at least 30cm thick armour. Further more armoured decks and bulkheads and the lower parts of the funnel protected. The armour was to made of Krupp cemented steel. Longitudinal nickel steel made bulkheads, torpedo nets and booms were to be used as anti torpedo protection.

Accommodation required for 35 officers, 15 engineers, 19 warrant officers, 36 petty officers and around 800 sailors.

As the battleship was to serve in the tropics [the Dutch East Indies] were good cooling devices for the ammunitions a necessity. There were two separate similar refrigerating plants acquired, each able to cool all ammunition magazines at the same time to a maximum allowed temperature of 28 degrees.

Blohm&Voss came with a design of 26.473 tons/26.055 long tons. Displacement 26.473 tons/26.055 long tons: hull 7.630 tons/7.510 long tons, armour 9.118 tons/8.974 long tons, engines 2.107 tons/2.074 long tons, armament 3.758 tons/3.699 long tons, fuel 3.030 tons/2.982 long tons, equipment 1.580 tons/1.555 long tons and margin 265 tons/261 long tons. The armour belt had a thickness of 10cm (stern)-15cm (bow)-25cm (amidships). The 6 double-ended oil-fired boilers supplied 38.000 ship via 4 screws allowing a design speed of 22 knots.

Sources
Archive Kon. Mij. De Schelde 1875-1970 (Municipality Archive Vlissingen, Netherlands) inventory number 214.1818.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dutch_1913_battleship_proposal

British shipyard Fairfield Shipbuilding Co. and Dutch shipyard of Kon. Mij. De Schelde designed battleship for the Royal Netherlands Navy in 1912-1914

Dutch newspaper Het nieuws van den dag voor Nederlandsch-Indië dated 18 October 1913. The Dutch union was collecting money to pay for dreadnoughts. The caricature shows a dreadnought entering the harbour of Tandjong Priok, Dutch East Indies. 

In the first part of the 20th Century was the Netherlands Royal Navy interested in obtaining (nine) dreadnoughts mainly for the defence of the Dutch East Indies. While Dutch shipyards were not able at that moment to build such warships were tenders asked from foreign shipyards. Namely the German shipyards Friedrich Krupp Germaniawerft at Kiel, Blohm&Voss at Hamburg, Vulcan Werke at Stettin, Schichau at Danzig, A.G. Weser, at Bremen, the British shipyards of Sir W.G. Armstrong, Elswick, Vickers at London, Beardmore at Glasgow and the Conventry Syndicate/Fairfield Shipbuilding&Co. at London and the Italian shipyards of Stabilimento Technico at Triest and Ansaldo at Sestri Ponente.

The armament was to consist of :
4x2-35.6cm/14” /45 breech loading guns in barbettes placed on the centre line, 4 guns were to fire straight ahead, 4 right astern and 8 on each broadside over the greatest possible sector on each side and for each gun 100 rounds;
16-15cm/6” quick firing /50 in casemates with 250 round for each gun. At least 4 guns were to fire straight ahead and 4 right astern and also a few degrees over the other side of the centre line and
12-7,5cm/3” quick firing guns without gun shields to be used as anti-balloon artillery as far as they were not mounted between decks, for each gun 300 pounds.
4-21” broadside submerged torpedo tubes. The 2 foremost torpedo tubes were to fire 10-15 degrees before the beam, the 2 backward torpedo tubes 10-15 degrees abaft the beam and for each gun 3 torpedoes.

While the Royal Netherlands Navy since decades for the main armament her ships fitted out with Krupp guns which performed always well and was trusted by the Dutch naval personnel was a strong preference for Krupp guns on the battleships to be built.

Main armour belt at least 25cm thick, sloping to the fore and aft ends with the lower limit no rising out of the water with the ship trimmed to trial displacement heeled over an angle of minimum 7 degrees. The 6” gun casemates were to protected by 18cm thick armour, the barbettes and conning tower by at least 30cm thick armour. Further more armoured decks and bulkheads and the lower parts of the funnel protected. The armour was to made of Krupp cemented steel. Longitudinal nickel steel made bulkheads, torpedo nets and booms were to be used as anti torpedo protection.

Accommodation required for 35 officers, 15 engineers, 19 warrant officers, 36 petty officers and around 800 sailors.

As the battleship was to serve in the tropics [the Dutch East Indies] were good cooling devices for the ammunitions a necessity. There were two separate similar refrigerating plants acquired, each able to cool all ammunition magazines at the same time to a maximum allowed temperature of 28 degrees.

The Dutch shipyard Kon. Mij. De Schelde seek cooperation with the British Coventry Syndicate. This syndicate consisted of John Brown&Company, Cannell, Laird&Company, The Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Company and the Coventry Ordnance Works. The intention was that the first dreadnought was to be built in the United Kingdom for which the Dutch shipyard got a financial compensation. If there was a second one to  be built, was to be done at the Dutch shipyard with assistance of the syndicate. On 29th May1914 was a tender sent by the syndicate. All firms in the syndicate were familiar with building and arming battleships like 5 of the Dreadnought type. Due to the outbreak of the First World War were never dreadnoughts built for the Dutch fleet.

The tender was for a battleship with as normal displacement 24.600 tons and as dimensions 590 (on waterline) x 88.5 (extreme) x 28’6” (normal) feet.

There were two option for machinery to be delivered. Direct-acting main turbines with geared cruising turbines delivering 35.000 [33.000] shp full power, 4.000 [3.750] hp for 12 knots and an range of 3.000 knots and an oil fuel bunker capacity of 850 [650] tons and for 6.000 knots a bunker capacity of 1.700 [1.200] ton. Oil fuel consumption per shp per hour at 12 knots per hour main engines 1.45 [1.24] and auxiliaries 0.45 [.2] lbs totally 1.90 [1.44] lbs. Steam per bhp per hour turbines only at full power 12.0 [11.25] lbs, at 50% full power 14.7 [12.3] lbs and at 15% full power 16,1 [16.5] lbs. Horsepower astern around 15.000 [15.000] shp. Total weight of machinery with water and 250 tons of spare gear 2.325 [2.125] tons. The second option was geared main turbines with compound geared cruising turbines, the figures for this option were between brackets.

The designed minimum speed was 22 knots. With an oil bunker capacity of 2.000 tons was a range of 6.000 knots (?) possible. Building costs excluded all guns and the 7,5cm/3” quick firing gun mountings 1.959.920 pound sterling. Additional price for all guns and the 3” quick firing gun mountings of own design and manufacture 189.850 pound sterling. She was to be delivered within 24 months from the date of signature of the contract and approval of the principal drawings ready for trials at the British port where she was built. The main armament was to consist of 4x2-14” breech loading guns which could be if wanted of Krupp manufacture, 16-6” breech loading guns, 12-3” anti aircraft guns and 21” torpedo tubes.

Total displacement of 24.600 tons: hull and fittings 8.650 ton, protective decks and bulkheads 2.400 ton, armour and bolts 4.825 ton, armament 4.450 tons, fuel for a range of 3.000 knots with a speed of 12 knots 850 ton, equipment 1.000 ton and margin 100 ton.

Armour and bolts 4.825 ton: armour belt 2.500 ton, armour battery for 6” guns 491 ton, barbette armour 1.212 ton, armour bulkheads, conning tower and director tower 590 ton and armoured tubes 32 ton.

Equipment 1.000 ton: fresh water 200 ton, provisions 135 ton, crew, mess provisions etc. 200 ton , masts 107 ton and complete inventory of ship, warrant officers, stores, anchors, torpedo nets, boats etc. 358 ton.

Sources
Archive Kon. Mij. De Schelde 1875-1970 (Municipality Archive Vlissingen, Netherlands) inventory number 214.1818.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dutch_1913_battleship_proposal

British shipyard Vickers designed battleship for the Royal Netherlands Navy in 1912-1914


In the first part of the 20th Century was the Netherlands Royal Navy interested in obtaining (nine) dreadnoughts mainly for the defence of the Dutch East Indies. While Dutch shipyards were not able at that moment to build such warships were tenders asked from foreign shipyards. Namely the German shipyards Friedrich Krupp Germaniawerft at Kiel, Blohm&Voss at Hamburg, Vulcan Werke at Stettin, Schichau at Danzig, A.G. Weser, at Bremen, the British shipyards of Sir W.G. Armstrong, Elswick, Vickers at London, Beardmore at Glasgow and the Conventry Syndicate/Fairfield Shipbuilding&Co. at London and the Italian shipyards of Stabilimento Technico at Triest and Ansaldo at Sestri Ponente.

The armament was to consist of :
4x2-35.6cm/14” /45 breech loading guns in barbettes placed on the centre line, 4 guns were to fire straight ahead, 4 right astern and 8 on each broadside over the greatest possible sector on each side and for each gun 100 rounds;
16-15cm/6” quick firing /50 in casemates with 250 round for each gun. At least 4 guns were to fire straight ahead and 4 right astern and also a few degrees over the other side of the centre line and
12-7,5cm/3” quick firing guns without gun shields to be used as anti-balloon artillery as far as they were not mounted between decks, for each gun 300 pounds.
4-21” broadside submerged torpedo tubes. The 2 foremost torpedo tubes were to fire 10-15 degrees before the beam, the 2 backward torpedo tubes 10-15 degrees abaft the beam and for each gun 3 torpedoes.

While the Royal Netherlands Navy since decades for the main armament her ships fitted out with Krupp guns which performed always well and was trusted by the Dutch naval personnel was a strong preference for Krupp guns on the battleships to be built.

Main armour belt at least 25cm thick, sloping to the fore and aft ends with the lower limit no rising out of the water with the ship trimmed to trial displacement heeled over an angle of minimum 7 degrees. The 6” gun casemates were to protected by 18cm thick armour, the barbettes and conning tower by at least 30cm thick armour. Further more armoured decks and bulkheads and the lower parts of the funnel protected. The armour was to made of Krupp cemented steel. Longitudinal nickel steel made bulkheads, torpedo nets and booms were to be used as anti torpedo protection.

Accommodation required for 35 officers, 15 engineers, 19 warrant officers, 36 petty officers and around 800 sailors.

As the battleship was to serve in the tropics [the Dutch East Indies] were good cooling devices for the ammunitions a necessity. There were two separate similar refrigerating plants acquired, each able to cool all ammunition magazines at the same time to a maximum allowed temperature of 28 degrees.

Vickers came with a design of 28.483 tons/28.033 long tons, an armour belt amidships with a thickness of 25cm. To obtain a horsepower of 34.000 ship were oil-fired 15 boilers needed to obtain the speed of 22 knots. Displacement 28.483 tons/28.033 long tons: hull 8.672 tons/8.535 long tons, armour 8.960 tons/8.820 long tons, engines 2.445 tons/2.460 long tons, armament 3.470 tons/3.415 long tons, fuel 2.999 tons/2.952 long tons, equipment 1.651 tons/1.625 long tons and margin 281 tons/280 long tons.

Sources
Archive Kon. Mij. De Schelde 1875-1970 (Municipality Archive Vlissingen, Netherlands) inventory number 214.1818.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dutch_1913_battleship_proposal