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Wednesday, 1 January 2020

Romanian tug annex salvage vessel Voinicul 1966-


Call sign YQAE and IMO 7623746. By 1981 owned by the Administratia Fluvial e Dunarii with as homeport Galatz, Romania. Other sources claiming she was owned by Navrom Roumanian Maritime, Bucharest. Gross tonnage 829 tons and as dimensions 47.17 (between perpendiculars)-52,30 (over all) x 11.03 x 5,82 (moulded) x 4,609 metres. Ice strengthened. Two oil fuelled 6 cylinders USA engines. Speed 14 knots. Built by Santierul Nava; Oltenits, Oltenitsa. 

Monday, 9 December 2019

Dutch general cargo ship Eemshorn 2008-



Gent, Belgium 10 November 2016

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Delfzijl, Netherlands, IMO 9393278, MMSI 244703000 and call sign PHNY. Owned and managed by Wagenborg Shipping, Delfzijl, Netherlands. Built by Ferus Smit, Leer, Germany in 2008. 

German whalers successful according to the Dutch newspaper Nederlandsche staatscourant dated 1 July 1822

An item dated Hamburg, Germany 24th June reported that the first ship returned on the 20th from the whale and seal hunting off Greenland. She arrived with full cargo holds at Gluckstadt bringing with her very satisfying tidings from other ships from the Elbe area. While the hunting was the last years very worse were just 3 ships fitted out at Gluckstadt. 

Hardly any whales sighted according to the Dutch newspaper Nederlandsche staatscourant dated 14 October 1822

An item dated Copenhagen, Denmark 1st referred to a letter from Holsteinburg, Greenland dated 1st August reported that the last winter was not particularly though. However in stead to normal conditions when hundreds of whales could be seen, the number of sightings was limited to just a few. This was probably caused by the ice floating from the Arctic to the south resulting in worse catch results for all whalers, Further more were some ships lost in the heavy storm of 12-13th August. 

American light cruiser USS Springfield 1943-1980

Amsterdam, Netherlands 7 October 1967
National Archive, The Hague, Netherlands. Joost Evers, Anefo Collection. Source

Cleveland-class

Of the Cleveland-class. Laid down at the Fore River shipyard of the Bethlehem Steel Corporation, Springfield, Illinois, USA on 13 February 1943, launched while sponsored by Mrs. Angelina Bertera and Miss Norma McCurley on 9 March 1944, commissioned on 9 September 1944, reclassified as CLG-7 after being rebuilt at Quincy/Boston as a Providence class guided missile light cruiser on 23 May 1957, decommissioned on 15 May 1974, reclassified as CG-7 on 1 July 1975, stricken on 31 July 1980 and finally sold to be broken up on 11 March 1980.

With a displacement of 10.601/10.000 long tons were her dimensions 185,95 x 20,19 x 7,49 metres or 610’1” x 66’3” x 24’7”. The geared turbines supplied 100.000 hp/74.570 kW allowing a speed of 31,6knots. Her crew numbered 1.319 persons and her armament consisted of 4x3-15cm/6” guns, 12-13cn/5” guns and 28-4cm guns.

In the period September-November 1967 she conducted gunnery exercises and was testing guide missiles and afterwards visited England, Netherlands, Portugal, Spain and Majorca. According to the newspaper Amigoe di Curacao dated 31 January 1969 was a non-official visit to Curacao, Netherlands Antilles planned between 3-6 February. Her commanding officer was L.W. Zech jr. 

American tug Marengo (1893) 1902-

Operated by the Engineer Corps of the US Army. Displacement 137 tons. Dimensions 80.0 x 18.2 x 8.8 (depth) feet. Built at Baltimore, Maryland, USA in 1893 and purchased there  in in 1902. Ex-Maude (92553) and U.S. Engineer Genrea; Abbot. Estimated value 10.200 US dollars. Crew numbers 7 (including 2 officers) and stationed in 4th district Mississippi river.

Source
Fiftieth annual list of Merchant vessels of the United States with official numbers and signal letters and lists of vessels belonging to the United States Government with distinguishing signals. Year ended June 30, 1918. U.S. Department of Commerce, Washington 1919. 

American tug Manchac (1886) 1887-

Operated by the Engineer Corps of the US Army. Rc-Kohn Orm No. 2 (76556 and U.S. Engineer General Comstock. Displacement 113 tons. Dimensions 78.0 c 17.0 x 7.6 (depth) feet. Built at Paducah, Kentucky, USA in 1886 and acquired there in 1887. Estimated value 2.000 dollars. Crew numbers 7 (including 2 officers) and stationed 4th district Mississippi river.

Source
Fiftieth annual list of Merchant vessels of the United States with official numbers and signal letters and lists of vessels belonging to the United States Government with distinguishing signals. Year ended June 30, 1918. U.S. Department of Commerce, Washington 1919. 

American sternwheel tug Chalmette 1915-

Operated by the Engineer Corps of the US Army. Displacement 132 tons. Dimensions 105.0 x 21.0 x 5.0 (depth) feet. Built at Jeffersonville, Indiana, USA in 1915. Estimated value 19.000 dollars. Crew numbers 7 (including 2 officers) and stationed 4th District Mississippi river.

Source
Fiftieth annual list of Merchant vessels of the United States with official numbers and signal letters and lists of vessels belonging to the United States Government with distinguishing signals. Year ended June 30, 1918. U.S. Department of Commerce, Washington 1919. 

Dutch ram monitor Reinier Claeszen 1890-1915

Source
Vice admiraal Norman MacLeod. 
Chapter VI. De Marine, published in “Eene Halve Eeuw [1848-1898].

Her main purpose was to defend the tidal inlets and especially the so-called Zuiderfrontier. The order to her building at the Kon. Fabriek van stoom- en andere werktuigen te Amsterdam was given in July 1889. However this factory was liquidated and the order given to the navy yard Amsterdam while the shipyard Kon. Mij. De Schelde at Flushing would manufacture the engines and boilers. She was laid down on 24 September 1890. launched on 21 November 1891, trial on 7 October 1893 and commissioned at Hellevoetsluis on 1 March 1894. Stationed in February 1904 at Flushing when the Netherlands wanted to preserve her neutrality during the war between Russia and Japan. In 1907 was she temporarily stationed at Rotterdam during the strikes in the harbour. Decommissioned on 21 August 1907 for major repairs at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis and on 2 April 1908 brought to Flushing to receive three new Yarrow boilers. These water tube boilers no.’s 102-104 were ordered on 27 December 1907, she arrived at Flushing on 3 April 1908 and departed on 3 November. On 1 April 1913 again decommissioned but the repairs were stopped on 28 November. The morning edition of the newspaper Algemeen Handelsblad dated 10 December 1914 reported her sale at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis a day earlier for ƒ 39.715 to the N.V. Frank Rijsdijks Scheepsslooperij at Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht.

With a displacement of 2.479 ton were her dimensions 70,00 x 1352 x 4,55 metres. The engines and 3 Scottish boilers supplied 2.315 ihp allowing while driving 2 screws a speed of 12,5 miles. Coal bunker capacity 110 ton. The armament consisted original of 2-21cm guns, 1-17cm gun, 4-5cm guns, 3-37cm guns and 2 torpedo guns. In 1908 were both torpedo guns removed and in 1913 was the 17cm gun (placed aft) replaced by 1-15cm gun. The armour consisted of a 100-120mm thick belt, a 50-75mm thick deck while the gun turret and conning tower were protected by 280 mm thick armour. Her crew numbered 159 men. Costs when for the first time commissioned ƒ 1.960.038,00.

French privateer Spéculateur 1813

Lugger, captured by British Reinder on 21 November 1813.

Source
J. Vichot. Repertoire des navires de guerre français. Paris, 1967. 

French privateer Spéculateur 1807-1808

Lugger, mentioned between 1807-1808.

Source
J. Vichot. Repertoire des navires de guerre français. Paris, 1967.  

French privateer Sorcier 1808-1813

Brig, mentioned between 1808-1813.

Source
J. Vichot. Repertoire des navires de guerre français. Paris, 1967. 

Bulgarian bulk carrier Belasitza 2011-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 23rd May 2015

Malta-flagged, homeport Valletta, Malta, IMO 9498262, MMSI 256675000 and call sign (HA2903, Built by Shanhaiguan Shipbuilding Industry, Qinhuangdo, China in 2011. Owned and managed by Navibulgar, Varna, Bulgaria.

French count of Artois travelling with Russian warships towards Netherlands underway towards Germany according to the Dutch newspaper Oprechte Haerlemsche courant dated 13 June 1793

An item dated The Hague, Netherlands 11th reported that the two Russian warships which were earlier lying at Hull, England arrived at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands with on board the count of Artois (1) which anonymous travelled via Rotterdam, Netherlands towards Hamm, Westfalen, Germany.

Note
1. Charles Philippe (9 October 1757-6 November 1836) who became king of France as Charles X between 16 September 1824-2 August 1830.

Dutch East Indies bark Célène en Marie cruising in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 7 October 1893

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 7th reported the departure of the Dutch East Indies bark Célène en Marie captain Van Alphen towards Banka, Dutch East Indies.

Dutch warship Sint Pieter 1652-1653

Of he board Rotterdam, fluyt, mentioned in 1652-1653, an armament of 24-28 guns and a crew numbering 100-122 men. Present at battle at Terheide 10 August 1653 and arrived mastless at Goeree, captain Simon Cornelisz.

British prize Supply of French privateer le Revange wrecked according to the Dutch newspaper Amsterdamse courant dated 18 December 1806

An item reported that the British prize Supply captain Pattison stranded at Texel, Netherlands underway with coal from Shield, England towards London, England and lost. She was captured by the French privateer le Revange captain Cornwinder. The price master and 4 men included two British came safely on land, 3 others drowned.

Singapore bulk carrier Golden Strength 2009-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 27 September 2014

Hong Kong/China-flagged, homeport Hong Kong, IMO 9413420, MMSI 477207100 and call sign VRFA7.

Dutch guard vessel Zeepost 1781-1782

Of the admiralty Noorderkwartier, a so-called uitlegger, mentioned between 1781-1782, an armament of 6 guns and a crew numbering 20-30 men. Commanded in by captain De Leeuw.

American submarine R 18 (1918) in 1923

Launched in 1918, completed in 1918, displacement 569 (surfaced)-? (submerged) tons, horsepower 880 (submerged)-934 (submerged) hp, oil-fired internal combustion machinery (surfaced)-electric machinery (submerged) and an armament of 1-3”gun, 4 torpedo tubes for which 8 torpedoed were taken with her.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands)  inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

American submarine R 11 (1919) in 1923

Launched in 1919, completed in 1919, displacement 569 (surfaced)-? (submerged) tons, horsepower 880 (submerged)-934 (submerged) hp, oil-fired internal combustion machinery (surfaced)-electric machinery (submerged) and an armament of 1-3”gun, 4 torpedo tubes for which 8 torpedoed were taken with her.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands)  inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

Taiwan bulk carrier (ex-Canpotex Redemption II 2005-2010) Ansac Splendor 2010-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 20 February 2016

Panama-flagged, IMO 9288239, MMSI 352328000 and call sign 3EAE9. Ex-Canpotex Redemption II renamed May 2010. Built by Kanda Shipbuilding, Kure, Japan in 2005. Owned and managed by Sincere Industrial, Taipei, Taiwan.

Preliminary design for an American scout cruiser dated 4 March 1921


Drawing S-584-175 considered to be large to be affordable although it was used as a basic design for 5 alternatives. The ideas were later used in designing the 11.512 long tons full load Pensacola heavy cruiser-class of the Fiscal Year 1926.Dimensions 610 (on water line) x 57.0 (on waterline) x20.75 feet and a displacement of 10.750 ton. Metacenter above base 24,15, C. of G. above base 20,39 and GM 3,76. Freeboard maximum at stem 29.0 and at AP 14.0 feet. Total depth at MP measured at of uppermost strength DK 36 feet. Displacement normal 10.750 ton: hull (not protected) 4.465 ton, hull fittings 528 ton, protection (a11) 1.335 ton, steam engineering 1.632 ton, reserve feed 2/3 100 ton, battery 400 ton, ammunition 247 ton, equipment 242 ton, outfit and 2/3 stores 322 ton, fuel oil 2/3 full supply 950 ton and margin 529 ton. Coefficients at normal displacement longitudinal 0.58, midship 0.915 and displacement-length 47.4. The red. gear driven turbines and 12 boilers divided over 4 boiler rooms were to supply 48.000 ehp allowing a speed of 33 knots and with a speed of 10 knots a range of 8.000 nautical miles. The armament was to consist pf 4x2-8.8” guns, 4-5” anti aircraft guns and 2x3-21” torpedo tubes. Barbettes were not protected, the conning tower by 80” thick armour. Further more a protective deck and over the magazine a splinter deck both 3” thick.

Source the so-called Spring Styles Book 1 (March 1911-September 1925). Naval History and Heritage Command. Lot S-584. Preliminary designs prepared by mostly civilians working at the Bureau of Construction and Repair (succeeded by the Bureau of Ships nowadays the Naval Sea Systems Command) under supervision of naval architects of the Navy Construction Corps. A major part of the drawings is presented to the General Board which adviced the Secretary of the Navy.

Italian navy testing new ammunition against balloons according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1913-1914 no. 4

An item reported that off Nettuno near Rome, Italy new ammunition was tested against balloons. Torpedo boats towed balloons and guns fired with a new shells fitted out with new ingenious fuses produced by Krupp and Ehrhardt.

Dutch bark Thorbecke IV underway from the Dutch East Indies towards the Netherlands according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 10 November 1888

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 10th reported the departure of the Dutch bark Thorbecke IV captain De Jong towards Rotterdam, Netherlands.(1)

Note
1. Call sign PTQR, net capacity 1.000 tons/2.599,10 cubic metres/917,48 tons of 2,83 cubic metres and as homeport Amsterdam, Netherlands.

German shipyard Blohm&Voss building huge floating dock according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1905-1906 no. 8

An item referred to the magazine Schiffbau reporting that the shipyard of Blohm&Voss, Hamburg, Germany decided to built a floating dock with a lift capacity of 35.000 tons. Dimensions 230 x 45 metres and built in 5 compartments.

Dutch bark Kersbergen cruising in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 17 November 1888

An item dated 16th  reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer [nowadays Anyer, Indonesia] by the Dutch bark Kersbergen underway from Batavia, Dutch East Indies towards Padang, Dutch East Indies.(1)

Note
1. Call sign PHGS, homeport Baarn, Netherlands and net capacity 2.790,77 cubic metres/985,14 tons of 2,83 cubic metres.

German tug (ex-Nordsee 2010) Nordic 2010-

Germany-flagged, homeport Hamburg, Germany, IMO 9525962, MMSI 211574000 and callsign DIBL. Dimensions 78,00 x 16,40 x 6,00 metres, summer deadweight 2.114 tons, gross tonnage 3.374 tons, net tonnage 1.012 tons  and a gross tonnage of 3.300 tons. Total horsepower 17.200 kW/23.065bhp. Speed 19,9 knots. Bollard pull. Owned and managed by Bugsier Reederei, Hamburg, Germany. Built at the PS Werften Wolgast, Wolgast, Germany in 2010. Ex-Nordsee renamed November 2010.

Dutch warship Gouden Leeuw 1625-1626

Of the ship, admiralty Amsterdam, hired for Dutch-British expedition to Spain from Marten Janssen D’ouwe Roos, monthly rental price ƒ 1400 in mentioned 1625-1626, a crew numbering 140 men and a tonnage of 170-200 last. Commanded by captain Pieter Barentssen Dorrevelt, lieutenant Bouwen van der Gouw, writer Pauwels de Fonteine.

Liberian tanker (ex-Arendal 2010, Navig8 Arendal 2010-2011) Arendal 2011-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 16 May 2015

Panama-flagged, IMO 9516222, MMSI 370297000 and call sign 3EWV4. Ex-Arendal renamed January 2010 and Navig8 Arendal renamed 7 February 2011. Built at the SPP Shipbuilding Sacheon Shipyard, Sacheon, South Korea in 2010. Owned and managed by World Tankers management, Monrovia, Liberia.

American brig Planet underway from Surinam towards USA according to the Dutch newspaper Nieuwe Surinaamsche courant dated 23 September 1835

An item reported the clearance at Paramaribo, Surinam on the 22nd by the North American brig Planet captain Joseph Lurven bound for Boston, USA loaded with 162 barrels molasses.

Dutch ship Agenoria underway from Surinam towards the Netherlands according to the Dutch newspaper Nieuwe Surinaamsche courant dated 4 February 1835

An item reported the clearance at Paramaribo, Surinam on the 2nd of the Dutch ship Agenoria captain W. van der Kolf bound for Middelburg, Netherlands loaded with 300 barrels sugar.

Dutch ship Maria Anna underway from Surinam towards the Netherlands according to the Dutch newspaper Nieuwe Surinaamsche courant dated 28 October 1835

An item reported the clearance at Paramaribo, Surinam on the 24th of the Dutch ship Maria Anna captain E.P. Brons bound for Amsterdam, Netherlands loaded with 212 barrels sugar, 18 bales cleaned cotton, 28 bales cacao, 94 skins and 7 barrels Geoffroij

American brig Charles arriving at Surinam coming from the USA according to the Dutch newspaper Nieuwe Surinaamsche courant dated 26 September 1838

An item reported the arrival at Paramaribo, Surinam on the 23rd of the North American brig Charles captain James Rowe coming in 37 days from Boston, USA.

German container ship MSC Texas 2004-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 18 July 2015

Germany-flagged, homeport Hamburg, Germany, IMO 9286243, MMSI 211830000 and call sign DCSY2. Built by Hyundai Heavy Industries, Ulsan, South Korea in 2004. Owned by Conti Holding, Munchen, Hamburg and managed by NSB Niederelbe, Buxtehude, Germany.

Dutch warship Koning David 1643-1654

Of the admiralty Friesland, smak, built at Harlingen, Netherlands in 1643, last mentioned in 1654, dimensions 58 x 14½ x 6 feet, an armament of 2 bronze guns and a crew numbering 21 men. In 1654  revenue tasks on the Wadden, captain Bartel Salingh.

Dutch East Indies bark Fathool Rachman cruising in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 15 August 1887

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 15th reported the arrival of the Dutch East Indies bark Fathool Rachman captain Sech Achmad Djawas coming from Pecalongan, Dutch East Indies.(1)

Note
1. The bark Fathool Rachman, call sign TDHV, homeport Sumanap, Dutch East Indies and net capacity 805,14 cubic metres/284,50 tons of 2,83 cubic metres?

Dutch East Indies bark Joeserien cruising in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 15 August 1887

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 15th reported the arrival of the Dutch East Indies bark Joeserien coming from the East.(1)

Note
1. Identical to the schooner Juserin, call sign TFKD, net capacity 204 tons and as homeport Grissee, Dutch East Indies?

Dutch transport Burg 1688

Of the admiralty Amsterdam, hired Amsterdam, Netherlands for ƒ 1.500 as part of the fleet which brought king-stadtholder Willem III to England 1688. Master Sieuwert Lieukes, appraised value of ship ƒ 3.850.

Sunday, 8 December 2019

Monaco owned yacht Karima (1993) 2004-



Inner harbour of Vlissingen, Netherlands 7 December 2019

Bermuda-flagged, homeport Hamilton, IMO 1002706, MMSI 310034000 and call sign ZCAU2. Ex-Maupiti renamed October 2004. Built by Amels, Vlissingen, Netherlands in 1993. Owned and managed by Fraser Worldwide, Monaco. 

Dutch lugger Jacob Johannes (SCH 235) for sale according to the Dutch newspaper Nieuwe Vlaardingsche courant dated 20 November 1915

An announcement reported the intended public auction by notary F.L.G. d’Aumerie in the Nieuwe Verkooplokaal, Wassenaarsche straat, Scheveningen on Monday 29th at 11:00 o’clock of the Dutch wood built lugger Jacob Johannes (SCH 235), last master Arie den Dulk, with inventory.

Dutch wood built lugger Dankbaarheid (SCH 381) for sale according to the Dutch newspaper Nieuwe Vlaardingsche courant dated 20 November 1915

An announcement reported the intended public auction by notary F.L.G. d’Aumerie in the Nieuwe Verkooplokaal, Wassenaarsche straat, Scheveningen on Monday 29th at 11:00 o’clock of the Dutch wood built lugger Dankbaarheid (SCH 381), last master Gerrit Buijs. with inventory.

Dutch lugger Elisabeth Cornelia (SCH 438) for sale according to the Dutch newspaper Nieuwe Vlaardingsche courant dated 20 November 1915

An announcement reported the intended public auction by notary F.L.G. d’Aumerie in the Nieuwe Verkooplokaal, Wassenaarsche straat, Scheveningen on Monday 29th at 11:00 o’clock of the Dutch wood built lugger Elisabeth Cornelia (SCH 438), last master Klaas Grootveld, with inventory.

Dutch yacht Anawa orSX62 2018-


Inner harbour of Vlissingen, Netherlands 7 December 2019

Netherlands-flagged, IMO 9814351, MMSI 244020690 and call sign PA3494. Other sources claiming Cayman Islands-flagged. and calling her Anawa. SeaXplorer 65 type. 5 July 2018 launched at Damen Shipyards Galati, Romania. 

Hungarian inland screw steamship Nina in 1921

After the First World War (1914-1918) lost by the German, Austro-Hungarian and Ottoman Empires was Walker D. Hines appointed as international arbitrator responsible for the ceding of tugs and other inland vessels by Germany, Bulgaria, Austria and Hungary to the Allied Powers. For Austria respectively Hungary were the Treaties of St. Germain and Trianon leading. Lists were made of the involved vessels including some details and what their fate was to be. A list dated Paris, France 2 August 1921 reported that prior to the end of the hostilities Hungary possessed over material for maintenance purposes on the Danube. This included the inland still screw steamship Nina in possession of the BHKRT, tonnage 29 tons, horsepower 90hp and lying at Budapest.(1)

Note
1. BHKRT=Budapesti Homok es Kavicszallito Rescv. Tars (Sand and Gravel Conveying Society Ltd.)

Source
Reports of International Arbitral Awards. Navigation on the Danube, 2 August 1921, volume 1. UN, 2006. 

Hungarian inland iron barge for elevator A.s. 16-24 in 1921

After the First World War (1914-1918) lost by the German, Austro-Hungarian and Ottoman Empires was Walker D. Hines appointed as international arbitrator responsible for the ceding of tugs and other inland vessels by Germany, Bulgaria, Austria and Hungary to the Allied Powers. For Austria respectively Hungary were the Treaties of St. Germain and Trianon leading. Lists were made of the involved vessels including some details and what their fate was to be. A list dated Paris, France 2 August 1921 reported that prior to the end of the hostilities Hungary possessed over material for maintenance purposes on the Danube. This included the inland iron barge for elevator A.s. 16-24 of Atlantica and before the war of Hofbauer&Lehner and lying at Budafok.(1)

Note
1. Atlantica=Atlantica tengerhajozasi Resrv. Tars (Atlantica Marine Navigation Co. Ltd.).

Source
Reports of International Arbitral Awards. Navigation on the Danube, 2 August 1921, volume 1. UN, 2006. 

German tug Torsten 2012-


Inner harbour of Vlissingen, Netherlands 7 December 2019

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Rotterdam, Netherlands, IMO 9623142, MMSI 245439000 and call sign PCLE. Built by Gemsdan Shipbuilding Industry, Istanbul, Turkey in 2012. Owned and managed by Schramm&Sohn Schleppschiffahrt, Brunsbuettel, Germany. Until 2017 Saint Vincent&Grenadines flagged. 

American tug Arthur Hider 1898-

Operated by the Engineer Corps of the US Army. Displacement 350 tons. Dimensions 163.0 x 30.0 x 6.0 (depth) feet. Built and purchased at Jeffersonville, Indiana, USA in 1898. Estimated value 27.000 US dollars. Crew numbers 26 (including 8 officers) and stationed Bayou Tech, Louisiana.

Source
Fiftieth annual list of Merchant vessels of the United States with official numbers and signal letters and lists of vessels belonging to the United States Government with distinguishing signals. Year ended June 30, 1918. U.S. Department of Commerce, Washington 1919. 

American tug Boaz (1871) 1911-

Operated by the Engineer Corps of the US Army. Displacement 73.5 tons. Dimensions 65.0 x 16.3 x 7.0 (depth) feet. Built at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania in 1871 and purchased at New Orleans, Louisiana, USA in 1911. Ex-Boaz (2813). Estimated value 11.000 US dollars. Crew numbers 5 (including 2 officers) and stationed Bayou Tech, Lousiana.

Source
Fiftieth annual list of Merchant vessels of the United States with official numbers and signal letters and lists of vessels belonging to the United States Government with distinguishing signals. Year ended June 30, 1918. U.S. Department of Commerce, Washington 1919. 

Dutch diving vessel Zr. Ms. Nautilus (A853) 1992-



Inner harbour of Vlissingen, Netherlands 7 December 2019

Of the Cerberus-class built at the Scheepswerf Visser, Den Helder, Netherlands. Commissioned on 18 August 1992. Maximum displacement 297 ton and as dimensions 37,8 x 8,7 metres. Lengthened in 2008 with 10,5 metres and modernized at the same time. Crew numbers 6 men. IMO 9021758, MMSI 245989000 and call sign PAYO. 

Russian submarines sighted off Sulina, Romania according to a CIA report dated 21 September 1955

An item reported the presence of two Soviet submarines with an estimated length of 55-60 metres in the Sulina channel at Sulina, Romania on 10 June 1955. Guns, w/t and radar aerials could not be seen.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, document number CIA-RDP80-00810A008000610003-6

Romanian inland warships exercising on the Danube according to a CIA report dated 21 September 1955

An item reported that on 6 July 1955 on the Danube off Carnavoda, Romania three Romanian river monitors and several smaller vessels were exercising.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, document number CIA-RDP80-00810A008000610003-6

Thaelmann Shipyard, Brandenburg, East Germany building minesweeping pinnaces according to a CIA report dated 5 August 1953

An item reported that the Thaelmann Shipyard, Brandenburg, East Germany was to built under her 1953 building program the minesweeping pinnaces 508/1-508/6. The pinnaces were to be built with 4mm thick skin plates and their propulsion consisted of 2-150/200hp Buckau-Wolf diesels. Their equipment included a starter, an electric compressor, a fire pump, large cable loops, a spraying system and a smoke screen device. In the comments on this item was said that the cable loops were degassing equipment and that the spraying system probably for the ammunition rooms was meant.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, document number
CIA-RDP80-00810A001700630001-3

Dutch diving vessel Zr. Ms. Nautilus (A853) 1992-



Inner harbour of Vlissingen, Netherlands 7 December 2019

Of the Cerberus-class built at the Scheepswerf Visser, Den Helder, Netherlands. Commissioned on 18 August 1992. Maximum displacement 297 ton and as dimensions 37,8 x 8,7 metres. Lengthened in 2008 with 10,5 metres and modernized at the same time. Crew numbers 6 men. IMO 9021758, MMSI 245989000 and call sign PAYO. 

Maintenance of Romanian river gunboats at Oltanitas, Romania according to a CIA report dated 21 September 1955

An item reported that in begin June at Oltanitas, Romania a former Austrian now Romanian river gunboat was lying on the slips. Mid June 1955 was a Romanian river gunboat seen which was hauled up to the slips. On the Danube were several fishing vessels and a completed Volga lighter seen.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, document number CIA-RDP80-00810A008000610003-6

Modernisation of the Romanian submarine Delfinul at Galati, Romania according to a CIA report dated 26 June 1952

An item referred to an anonymous informant who reported that at the Sovromtransport shipyards at Galati. Romania the complete structure of the Soviet submarine Delfinul (No. 80 Man) was changed due she was and old and damaged during the Second World War. The modernisation as yet not started due to lacking the submerging chambers and the new machinery ordered in England. The informant heard however that the disassembling of her was speeded up so that if the needed parts arrived the assembling immediately could start. She was to be completed by autumn 1952. One she was completed she was dive during 24 hours to check if everything was done well.(1)

Note
1. She was laid down at the navy shipyard at Fiume, Italy in 1927, launched in 1930, completed in 1931, commissioned in 1936, executing some patrols in the Black Sea until she was sent to Galati where she arrived on 24 November 1941 to be refitted, confiscated by Russian forces after 23 August 1944, commissioned as TS-3 on 20 October 1944, decommissioned on 12 October 1945, given back to Romania in 1951 and finally stricken in 1957. Built under Romanian supervising. With a displacement of 650 (surfaced)-900 (submerged) tons and as dimensions 68 x 5,9 x 3,6 metres or 223 x 19 x 12 feet. The machinery consisted of 2 Sulzer diesel engines and 2 electric motors driving 2 shafts allowing a speed of 14 (surfaced)-9 (submerged) knots and a range of 2.000 nautical miles. Her crew numbered 55 men. Armament consisted of 1-10,2cm Bofors naval gun, 1x1-1,3cm machinegun and 8-53,3cm torpedo tubes (4 fore, 4 aft). 

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, document number
CIA-RDP80-00809A000600020184-2

Sea mines used in Romanian waters according to a CIA report dated 26 June 1952

An item referred to an anonymous informant who reported that he was not familiar with the topic mines but had heard that mines were laid by ships. The ones near the shore of Constanta, Romania were of the magnetic type, the ones at sea of the contact type.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, document number
CIA-RDP80-00809A000600020184-2

Liberian bulk core/oil carrier (ex-Mozart 1969-1983, Sea Victory 1983-1991) Venice 1991-1995 (Denebe 1995)


Liberia-flagged, homeport Monrovia and IMO 6910130. As the Venice owned by Ludo maritime Corporation. Ex-Mozart renamed 1983 and Sea Victory renamed November 1991. Broken up at Alang, India in 1995. Built at the Ishikawajima-Harima KI/JMU Kure Shipyard, Kure, Japan in 1969. Gross tonnage 43.456 tons, net tonnage 32.367 tons, deadweight 85.989 tons and as dimensions 254,5 x 36,6 x 14 metres. Speed 14 knots.

General cargo ship (ex-Varna 1987-2011, Varna 5 2011-2012) Sv. Georgi 2012-2014


IMO 8518065. Ex-Varna renamed in May 2011 and Varna 5 renamed in September 2010. Gross tonnage 7.455 tons, net tonnage 3.523 tons, deadweight 8.800 tons and as dimensions 123,6 x 21 x 8 metres. TEU capacity 446. Speed 14 knots. Built at the SA Juliana Const. Gijonesa, Gijon, Spain in 1987. As the Varna owned and managed by Navigation Maritime, Bulgaria with as homeport Varna, Bulgaria, call sign L2EF and MMSI 207045000. As the Sv Georgi owned by Seaborne Trade Ltd., Bulgaria and sold to be broken up in Turkey in 2014.

Dutch bark Deliane underway from England towards the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 9 April 1888

An item dated 6th reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer [nowadays Anyer, Indonesia] by the Dutch bark Deliane underway from Cardiff, England towards Batavia, Dutch East Indies.(1)

Note
1. Identical to the frigate, call sign NLWF, homeport Amsterdam, Netherlands and net capacity 3.721,28 cubic metres/1.314,61 tons of 2,83 cubic metres?

German bark Möwe nearly destroyed telegraph cable off Anjer, Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated Monday 28 May 1888

An item reported that when the German bark Möwe left Anjer, Dutch East Indies on Friday morning she collided with the outside buoy of telegraph cable which cable she towed with her about a quart mile in north east direction the sea lucky enough without damaging the cable.

Belgian tug Progress towed two Dutch inland vessels into the harbour of Terneuzen, Netherlands during which operation one sunk according to the Dutch newspape Goessche Courant dated 9 May 1895

An item dated Terneuzen, Netherlands dated 7th reported that the same morning during low tide the Belgian tug Progress towed into the harbour the iron Rhine ships God met ons master Withmann of Druten, Netherlands and De Vliet master De Both of Steenbergen, Netherlands, both underway from Ruhrort, Germany loaded rail iron with bound for Gent, Belgium. The De Vliet however was by a strong current smashed to the Western harbour quay and sunk.

American bark Pilgrim arrived at Batavia, Dutch East Indies coming from the USA according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 16 March 1888

An item dated 15th reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer [nowadays Anyer, Indonesia] by the American bark Pilgrim underway from New York, USA towards Batavia, Dutch East Indies. Arrived the same day at her destination, captain Freeman, shipping agents factory Nederlandsche Handels Maatschappij.

Norwegian bark Emilie underway from Siam towards England according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 15 May 1888

An item dated 13th reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer [nowadays Anyer, Indonesia] by the Norwegian bark Emilie underway from Bangkok, Siam towards Falmouth, England.

Italian oil/chemical tanker Ray G 2006-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 6 March 2016

Italy-flagged, homeport Napoli, IMO 9293997, MMSI 247148600 and call sign IBXM. Built at the Shinasb Yard, Tongyoung, South Korea in 2006. Owned and managed by Gesarma, Ravenna, Italy.

Italian bark Stella B. underway from England towards Singapore according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated Monday 28 May 1888

An item dated 26th reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer [nowadays Anyer, Indonesia] by the Italian bark Stella B. underway from Cardiff, England towards Singapore.

German bark Senta underway from Hong Kong towards England according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 24 May 1888

An item dated 22nd reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer [nowadays Anyer, Indonesia] by the German bark Senta underway from Hong Kong towards London, England.

German bark Möwe underway from England towards Japan according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 26 May 1888

An item dated 24th reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer [nowadays Anyer, Indonesia] by the German bark Möwe underway from Cardiff, England towards Yokohama, Japan.

Argentinean cargo ship (Cap Melville 1970-1973, Clau Rolf 1973, Limpsfield 1973-1976, Lindfield 1976-1980) ) 1980-1995 (Cap Melville 1995-1999)


IMO 7022461. Gross tonnage 8.219 tons, net tonnage 4.475 tons, deadweight 10.750 tond and as dimensions 136.6 x 20,1 x 6,9-9,3 metres. Container capacity 233 TEU. Speed 19,25 knots. Arrived on 24 April 1999 at Mumbai, India to be broken up. Built at the Helsingor Skibso of Maskinbyg, Helsingor, Denmark in 1970. Ex-Cap Melville renamed 1973, Clau Rolf renamed 1973, Limpsfield renamed 1976, Lindfield renamed 1980 and renamed May 1995 Cap Melville. As the Malfrio owned by Compania Argentina de Transportes Maritimes (Ciamar) with as homeport Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Thais bark Charon Wattana underway from Siam towards British Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 22 May 1888

An item 19th dated reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer [nowadays Anyer, Indonesia] by the Thais bark Charon Wattana underway from Bangkok, Siam towards Bombay, British Indies.

Italian bark Domenico M. underway from England towards Singapore according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated Monday 28 May 1888

An item dated 26th reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer [nowadays Anyer, Indonesia] by the Italian bark Domenico M. underway from Cardiff, England towards Singapore.

American bark P.J. Carleton underway from Singapore towards USA according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 22 May 1888

An item dated 18th reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer [nowadays Anyer, Indonesia] by the American bark P.J. Carleton underway from Singapore towards New York, USA.

Dutch tug Victoria launched at Vlissingen, Netherlands to be used in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 15 December 1885


An item reported that on 30th October at the Kon. Mij. De Schelde, Vlissingen, Netherlands with success the small tug Victoria was launched. She was built for account of Mrs. Van Bruggen&Kruisinga at Samarang, Dutch East Indies. The engine and boiler were manufactured by W.K. Jacobs. After engine and boiler were placed and she executed her trials was she to be transport by a mail packet of the Mij. Nederland as deckload towards the Dutch East Indies.

Another newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated 30 October referred to a tiding received from Vlissingen, Netherlands that on the same afternoon the Victoria with success was launched for account of Van Bruggen en Kruisinga. The next morning she was top depart towards Haarlem, Netherlands to receive there her engine and boiler made by Jacobs.

The order card administration of the shipyard reports that her building was ordered on 26 June 1885, laid down by engineer J. Janszen with yard number 47 on 10 July, in he thrushes on 18 August, plated on 28 September, launched on 29 October (!) and delivered at Haarlem on 31 October. Built for account of W.H. Jacobs. Dimensions 50’0” (between perpendiculars)-10’0”x 4’3” x 7’2” (hold) or 15 x 3 x 2 metres. Steel built hull, other parts iron made. High pressure 60 ihp 85-90lbs pressure steam engine allowing a speed of 8,3 knots. According to a letter dated 31st written by Jacobs was on board 3 ton ballast, 4 ton coal and 4 ton drinking water, totally 11 ton.

In the order book (T214.1216) was as order date 27 June mentioned. Accepted for ƒ 4.750 included inventory but without engine or boiler. Screw steamship. At the same time was a second small screw steamship ordered to be named Marie (delivered on 14 November) with yard number 48 for an accepted price of ƒ 5.150, totally ƒ 10.498,35, included an extra of ƒ 598,35 for additional work.

Building costs ƒ 8.970,37 (stores ƒ 4.276,34, labour ƒ 2.915,55, 6% expenses ƒ 1.778,48) with a result a profit of ƒ 1.527,98.

Source
Archive Kon. Mij. De Schelde 1875-1970 (Municipality Archive Vlissingen) order administration and inventory number 214.1216.

Cypriot bulk carrier Nordmax 1995-2004 (Anna 2004-2008, Suerte 2008-)


As the Nordmax owned by Nordmax Shipping and managed by Reederei Nord Klaus E. Oldendorff, homeport Limassol and IMO 9081100. Built by Daewoo Shipbuilding&Marine Engineering, Geoje, South Korea in 1995. Gross tonnage 39.027, net tonnage 24.110 tons, deadweight 72.516 tons and as dimensions 224.8 x 33 x 13,82 metres. Speed 14,25 knots. As the Suerte Marshall Islands-flagged, owned and managed by Alexandria Shipping Athens, Greece, MMSI 538003146 and call sign V7)S4. Renamed Anna in March 2004 and Suerte on 6 May 2008.

British steam tanker Loutekan visiting Rotterdam, Netherlands according to the Dutch newspaper Nieuwsblad van het Noorden dated 28 January 1919

An item dated Rotterdam the 28th reported the arrival of the British steam tanker Loutekan at Rotterdam coming from Philadelphia. She was loaded with 5.900 tons of gasoline destined for the Allied troops in Germany.

American steamship Nebraskan torpedoed according to the Dutch newspaper Nieuwsblad van Friesland dated 28 May 1915

An item reported that the American steamship Nebraskan underway from Liverpool towards Delaware Breakwater was torpedoed on a a distance 40 miles of Fastnet. Her crew was saved while using the boats. She was flying large national flags and on both sides was her name in large letters painted. The newspaper thought it was hardly impossible for the submarine not to have recognize her while it was a beautiful  and clear evening.

Dutch constable Non decorated for his bravery according to the Dutch newspaper Rotterdamsche courant dated 1 September 1804

An item dated Vlissingen 27th August reported that the on the Friday before the Commissary of the Batavian Navy C. Speeleveld in the presence of some civilians and navy officers and the complete crew of the hooker brig Maasnypmh constable J.C. Non decorated for his brave behaviour during the defence of the navy galliot Schrik.(1)

Note
1.The newspaper Groninger courant dated 24 April published an item dated Flushing the 16th reported that Ver Huell appointed cadet J.N. Olyve as commanding officer of the gun brig Schrik on board his father recently died during the fight. The gun galliot Schrik, department Amsterdam, was launched at Amsterdam 9 November 1798, sold 1808, 6 guns, 30 men. Was temporarily captured by the British but recaptured.

Saturday, 7 December 2019

Swedish cruiser Gotland 1930-1962 (1963)



Parkhaven Rotterdam, Netherlands 13 March 1949
National Archive, The Hague, Netherlands. Averink/Anefo Collection

The Dutch newspaper Het vrije volk dated 23 February1949 reported the intended unofficial visit between 12-16 March at Rotterdam. It was the first Swedish warship to visit the Netherlands after the Second World War. The edition dated Monday 14th March reported her arrival in the Parkhaven at 14:00 o’clock underway to her homeport Karlskrona after a 4 month voyage around Africa. Rotterdam was the 15th harbour she visited during this voyage. Another newspaper De Tijd dated 15th supplied more details adding that she made a training cruise for young midshipmen. After the return in Sweden was to be decided which of the midshipmen was stuibale for a naval career. She was converted into an anti aircraft cruiser and one of her officers stated that he was very proud on the Swedish navy. The 15th departed she. In the morning visited the Dutch vice admiral jhr. E.J. van Holthe, temporarily supreme command of the Dutch navy and chief of the naval staff.

The first design of this ship dated from December 1926 as an aircraft carrier able to carry twelve planes. However the 5,000 ton project as presented in January next year was thrown away when the navy demanded that she was in fact to be a hybrid carrier-cruiser-minelayer within a budget of 16.500,000 Swedish crones. A new design was made including the removal of one planned turret. Ordered on 7 June 1930, laid down at Götaverken, launched on 14 September 1933, commissioned 14 December 1934, rebuilt as an anti-aircraft cruiser in 1944, decommissioned 1956, sold in 1962 and broken up a year later. With a displacement of 4,600 tons were her dimensions 134,8 x 15,4 x 4,5 metres. Her steam turbines and four boilers allowed a speed of 27,5 knots. Her crew numbered 467 sailors and 60 men aircrew. The armament consisted of 2×2 and 2×1 15,2cm guns, 4-7,5cm anti aircraft guns, 4-,25cm anti aircraft guns and 6-53,3cm torpedo tubes. When used as an anti aircraft cruiser was the armament added with another 8-4,0cm guns. She carried before 1944 when used as an seaplane cruiser 6 Hawker Osprey planes although she was able to carry eight planes. 

French privateer Léonide 1805-1813

Brig, first mentioned in 1805, captured by British Nautilus in the Mediterranean on 7 February 1813.

Source
J. Vichot. Repertoire des navires de guerre français. Paris, 1967. 

French privateer Léon 1808

Mentioned in 1808.

Source
J. Vichot. Repertoire des navires de guerre français. Paris, 1967.  

French privateer Laure 1802

Brig, captured by British Immortalite on 14 April 1802.

Source
J. Vichot. Repertoire des navires de guerre français. Paris, 1967. 

French privateer Junon 1809

Privateer from Saint Malo, mentioned in 1809.

Source
J. Vichot. Repertoire des navires de guerre français. Paris, 1967. 

French privateer Junon 1813

Captured by British Cyane on 1 December 1813.

Source
J. Vichot. Repertoire des navires de guerre français. Paris, 1967. 

Dutch inland pusher tug (ex-Ijssel 1957-1988, Erny 1988-1996, Progres 1996-1998)) Dutch pusher tug (ex-IJssel 1957-1988, Erny 198801996, Progres 1996-1998) Sandra-F 1998-



Gent, Belgium 10 November 2016

Netherlands flagged, MMSI 244690966 and call sign PC3401 and ENI 02323527. Former Royal Netherlands Navy tug Hr. Ms. IJssel (Y8040) since 27 March 1957, since 4 January 1988 of the Dienst Domeinen, Netherlands, bought by M.N. van Santen, Rotterdam with number 27.17739on 24 May 1988, renamed Erny owned by A,F. Hulsman, Maasbracht, Netherlands since 7 October 1988, since 22 March 1997 as Progres of F.A.W. Hulsman, Maasbracht and since 22 April 1998 as Sandra-F of Fransbergen R. Holding B,V., Maasbracht. Laid down by N.V. Scheepswerven v/h H.H. Bodewes, Millingen, Netherlands with yard number 510 on 17 September 1956, launched on 19 January 1957 and commissioned in the Royal Netherlands navy on 20 March 1957. Dimensions in naval service 25,09 x 6,27 x 2,45. Crew numbered in naval service 5 men. Dimensions 25,32 x 5,97 x 2,84 x 2,83 metres. In 1988 converted into a pusher tug. 

American tug Itasca 1882-

Operated by the Engineer Corps of the US Army. Displacement 80 tons. Dimensions 94.0 x 15.5 x 3.0 (depth) feet. Built at Carondelet, Missouri, USA in 1882. Estimated value 6.206 US dollars. Crew numbers 4 (including 2 officers) and stationed on the Mississippi 1st and 2nd districts.

Source
Fiftieth annual list of Merchant vessels of the United States with official numbers and signal letters and lists of vessels belonging to the United States Government with distinguishing signals. Year ended June 30, 1918. U.S. Department of Commerce, Washington 1919. 

American tug Graham (1879) 1884-

Operated by the Engineer Corps of the US Army. Displacement 138 tons. Dimensions 134.2 x 27.8 x 3.0 (depth) feet. Built at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, USA in 1879 and there purchased in 1884. Ex-H.M. Graham (95564). Estimated value 17.619 US dollars. Crew numbers 10 (including 3 officers) and stationed on the Mississippi  1st and 2nd districts.

Source
Fiftieth annual list of Merchant vessels of the United States with official numbers and signal letters and lists of vessels belonging to the United States Government with distinguishing signals. Year ended June 30, 1918. U.S. Department of Commerce, Washington 1919. 

American tug Chisca 1897-

Operated by the Engineer Corps of the US Army. Displacement 450 tons. Dimensions 185.6 x 34.11 x 4.8 (depth) feet. Built at Jeffersonville, Indiana, USA in 1897. Estimated value 28.449 US dollars. Crew numbers 17 (including 4 officers) and stationed on the Mississippi 1st and 2nd districts.

Source
Fiftieth annual list of Merchant vessels of the United States with official numbers and signal letters and lists of vessels belonging to the United States Government with distinguishing signals. Year ended June 30, 1918. U.S. Department of Commerce, Washington 1919. 

Dutch 25 tons floating crane Ovet 8

Terneuzen, Netherlands 11 November 2016

Yugoslavian inland barge VI in 1921

After the First World War (1914-1918) lost by the German, Austro-Hungarian and Ottoman Empires was Walker D. Hines appointed as international arbitrator responsible for the ceding of tugs and other inland vessels by Germany, Bulgaria, Austria and Hungary to the Allied Powers. For Austria respectively Hungary were the Treaties of St. Germain and Trianon leading. Lists were made of the involved vessels including some details and what their fate was to be. A list dated Paris, France 2 August 1921 reported that while the former Hungarian owners now got the nationality of the Serb-Croat-Slovene Kingdom the Hungarian Jovanovic barge VI with a tonnage of 408 tons automatically became Yugoslavian.

Note
1. The Kingdom of Yugoslavia was formed on 1 December 1918 with merging the provisional State of Slovenes, Croats and Serbs (officially proclaimed on 29 October 1918) with the formerly independent Kingdom of Serbia. The latter kingdom was since 28 November 1918 united with the Kingdom of Montenegro. The Kingdom of Yugoslavia was until 3 October 1929 officially titled the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes.

Source
Reports of International Arbitral Awards. Navigation on the Danube, 2 August 1921, volume 1. UN, 2006.