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Thursday, 22 February 2018

Russian, Bulgarian and Romanian anti submarine warfare Poti-class corvettes 1960s-2005


Project 204 of which 66 units were built for the Soviet, Romanian and Bulgarian navies between 1960-1968, serving in the Soviet navy until the late 1980 and in the Bulgarian navy even in the 21st Century with the last 3 decommissioned in 2005. . Preceded by the Kronshtadt-class/Project 122bis and succeeded by the Pauk-class/Project 1241.2 Molniya-2. In the Bulgarian navy served the Khrabi, Strogi, Bezstrashni, Letjahhi, Bditelni and Naporisti and in the Romanian navy 3 units.

Displacement 508 9standard)-589 (full load) tons and as dimensions 59,4 x 7,9 x 2,0 metres pt 195 x 25.11 x 6.7 feet. The 2 gas turbines supplying 30.000shp and the 2 diesels supplied via 2 shafts 8.000 shp allowed a maximum speed of 38 knots. The range was with a speed of 10 knots 4.500 nautical miles and with maximum speed 520 nautical miles. The crew numbered 80 men. Armament consisted of 1x2-5,7cm/2,2 guns, and 4-40,6cm/16” anti submarine torpedo tubes although other unites of the class were armed with 2-53,3cm/2” torpedo tubes and 2 RBU-6000 anti submarine rockers (Romanian and early Soviet units had the RBU-2500). 

Polish submarine leaving the harbour of Gydnia, Poland according to a Cia report dated 9 April 1953

The Orzel sister ship of the Sep

An item reported that the Polish submarine lying in the harbour of Gdynia departed from the shipyard towards open sea in 16 December 1952.(1) Although fitted out with a saw-shaped net cutter on the bow there was no sign of a snorkel. At that moment were on the conning tower 4 men standing of which 2 officers according to their caps, another four men on the fore and three more in the fantail. All men not being officers were dressed in canvas overalls. The observer saw none leather suits. A last remark was that this seemed to be the only operational Polish submarine.(2)

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, document number CIA-RDP80-00810A000600290003-1.

Notes
1. After the Second World War became Poland a communist government part of the Eastern Bloc until 1989 when Poland became the independent Republic of Poland.
2. The Sep of the Orzel-class, laid down by the Rotterdamsche Doogdok Maatschappij, Rotterdam, Netherlands in November 1936, launched on 17 October 1938, completed in April 1939 and stricken in September 1969?

The fleet of the Bulgarian navy according to a CIA report dated 27 June 1951

The Bulgarian navy consisted of the following units:
4 300 ton minelayers, armed with 2 torpedo tubes and 1 small gun, built in 1905 although several times refitted and modernized and of which one was not longer seaworthy
6-60 ton German torpedo boats armed with 1 torpedo tube and a heavy machinegun. A number according to rumours to be increased by torpedo boats to hand over by the Soviet Union.
1-1.200 light destroyer used for training purposed purchased from the Soviet Union in 1950 for strengthening the Black Sea fleet.
2 submarines were underway from the Soviet Union for which the crew were trained at Sevastopol.
4/5 small minesweepers
In times of war were merchant ships to be added to the navy

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, document number CIA-RDP82-00457R008000300010-3

Dutch wind farm service vessel Offshore Phantom

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 3 February 2018

United Kingdom-flagged, MMSI 235083747 and call sign 2EBO7. Owned by Acta Marine, Den Helder, Netherlands. 

British fish freighter Mastwing sold towards the Netherlands to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 11 December 1936

An item reported that the British Hull Steam Fishing and Ice Company Limited, Hull, England at that moment in liquidation sold her fish freighter Mastwing of 199 gross and 71 net tons and built at Goole, England in 1908 in to the N.V. Holland, Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands to be broken up. 

French privateer chaloupe l’Heureuse of Dunkirk 1710

Commanding officer Jean Derycksen.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

British fish freighter Willet sold towards the Netherlands to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 11 December 1936

An item reported that the British Hull Steam Fishing and Ice Company Limited, Hull, England at that moment in liquidation sold her fish freighter Willet of 199 gross and 73 net tons and built at Goole, England in 1908 to the N.V. Holland, Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands to be broken up. 

British fish freighter Vigilant II sold towards the Netherlands to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 11 December 1936

An item reported that the British Hull Steam Fishing and Ice Company Limited, Hull, England at that moment in liquidation sold her fish freighter Vigilant II of 297 gross and 114 net tons and built at Glasgow, Scotland in 1908 to the N.V. Holland, Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands to be broken up. 

British fish freighter New Zealand sold towards the Netherlands to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 11 December 1936

An item reported that the British Hull Steam Fishing and Ice Company Limited, Hull, England at that moment in liquidation sold her fish freighter New Zealand of 290 gross and 116 net tons and built at Hull, England in 1898 to the N.V. Holland, Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands to be broken up. 

Cypriot reefer (ex-Reefer Jambu 1985-1996) Ice Rose 1996-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 3 February 2018

Marshall Islands-flagged, IMO 8311106, MMSI 538004733 and call sign V7YT9. Ex-Reefer Jambu renamed August 1996. Owned and managed by Maestro Shipmanagement, Limassol, Cyprus. Built by Hyundai Heavy Industries, Ulsan, South Korea in 1985. 

Dutch chiampan Schiedam around 1683

Of the Dutch East Indies Company. Lying at Batavia, Dutch East Indies. New.

Source
Archive Dutch East Indies Company (VOC), National Archive, The Hague inventory number 11250. List of all ships in <1683-1684<. 

Dutch chiampan Brouwershaven around 1683

Of the Dutch East Indies Company. Lying at Batavia, Dutch East Indies. New.

Source
Archive Dutch East Indies Company (VOC), National Archive, The Hague inventory number 11250. List of all ships in <1683-1684<. 

Dutch chialoupe Winthond around 1683

Of the Dutch East Indies Company. Lying at Batavia, Dutch East Indies. Used for all kind of purposes. Was to replace the Swarte Pot at Palembang, Dutch East Indies.

Source
Archive Dutch East Indies Company (VOC), National Archive, The Hague inventory number 11250. List of all ships in <1683-1684<. 

Dutch chialoupe Zalm around 1683

Of the Dutch East Indies Company. Lying at Batavia, Dutch East Indies. Used for all kind of purposes.

Source
Archive Dutch East Indies Company (VOC), National Archive, The Hague inventory number 11250. List of all ships in <1683-1684<. 

Wednesday, 21 February 2018

Dutch chialoupe Swarte Pot around 1683

Of the Dutch East Indies Company. Lying at Batavia, Dutch East Indies. Condemned and not worthy any repaired decided to be laid up. The Windhond was to replaced her at Palambang, Dutch East Indies.

Source
Archive Dutch East Indies Company (VOC), National Archive, The Hague inventory number 11250. List of all ships in <1683-1684<. 

Bulgarian army amphibious transport PTS 1965


The National Museum of Military History, Sofia, Bulgaria

Soviet built, medium-sized with a weight of 22.700kg. Used for transporting army unites, wheeled machinery, guns, ammunition and so on. Also used for sea landings. Used by the Bulgarian navy since 1965. Crew numbers 2 men. The 12cylinder 359hp allows a maximum speed at land of 42 kilometres and a range of 300 kilometres with a speed in the water if 10-12 kilometres. 

Dutch salvage vessel Buffel sold to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 23 July 1937

An item reported that the Dutch salvage vessel Buffel built in 1891 was sold by the N.V. W.A. van der Tak’s Bergingsvaartuig. Rotterdam, Netherlands to a Dutch firm to be broken up. 

British fish freighter Swift sold towards the Netherlands to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 11 December 1936

An item reported that the British Hull Steam Fishing and Ice Company Limited, Hull, England at that moment in liquidation sold her fish freighter Swift of 242 gross and 94 net tons and built Howden, England in 1897 to the N.V. Holland, Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands to be broken up. 

British fish freighter Hornsea sold towards the Netherlands to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 11 December 1936

An item reported that the British Hull Steam Fishing and Ice Company Limited, Hull, England at that moment in liquidation sold her fish freighter Hornsea of 305 gross and 126 net tons and built at Hull, England in 1900 to the N.V. Holland, Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands to be broken up. 

Dutch fishing vessel Njord sold toward France and renamed Roger-Juliette according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 10 January 1936

An item reported that the Dutch fishing vessel Njord of 154 gross tons and was built by the Wed. C. Boele, Slikkerveer, Netherlands in 1916 was sold by the Visscherij Maatschappij Mercurius, Vlaardingen, Netherlands to A. Tarin&Yvon, Paimpol, France and renamed Roger-Juliette. 

German general cargo ship Fokko Ukena 2007-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 3 February 2018

Antigua&Barbuda-flagged, homeport St. John’s, IMO 9375812, MMSI 304089000 and call sign V2GU3. Built by Slovenske Lodenice Komarno A.S., Komarno, Slovakia in 2007. Earlier Malta-flagged, homeport Valletta, call sign 9HYA8 and MMSI 256586000. Owned by MS Fokko Ukena Bojen Reederei GmbH&Co. KG, Moormerland, Germany and managed by Vertom-Bojen Bereederungs GmbH&Co. KG, Moormerland, Germany. 

Dutch chialoup Brak around 1683

Of the Dutch East Indies Company. Built by the company herself. Lying at Batavia, Dutch East Indies where she was used for daily service by for instance the water fiscal.

Source
Archive Dutch East Indies Company (VOC), National Archive, The Hague inventory number 11250. List of all ships in <1683-1684<. 

Dutch small chialoup Nagtegaal around 1683

Of the Dutch East Indies Company. Lying at Batavia, Dutch East Indies where she was used for daily service.

Source
Archive Dutch East Indies Company (VOC), National Archive, The Hague inventory number 11250. List of all ships in <1683-1684<. 

Dutch chialoup Kasteel Batavia around 1683

Of the Dutch East Indies Company. Lying at Batavia, Dutch East Indies where she was used for daily service. Built at the island Onrust, Dutch East Indies.

Source
Archive Dutch East Indies Company (VOC), National Archive, The Hague inventory number 11250. List of all ships in <1683-1684<. 

China intended to build 500 motor gunboats with Soviet support according to a CIA report dated 8 August 1951

An item reported the building by China of 500 motor gunboats Canton, China within just 3 months with the support of Soviet technicians. Supervisor was Ao-ssu-fu-ssu-chi of the Militrr Defence Headquarters of the South Chiba Coastal Defnce General headquarters. This Soviet advisor was furthermore appointed as supervisor for the building of defence installations. The machinery needed for the gunboats existed of new purchased, engines and reconditioned engines taken out of old trucks but the major part came out of around 350 Soviet made trucks.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, document number CIA-RDP82-00457R007900210001-5

Bulgarian navy torpedo launcher OTAM-53-206


The National Museum of Military History, Sofia, Bulgaria

Manufactured in the Soviet Union and since 1967 used by the Bulgarian Navy. With a length of 8,680 metres and a weight of 920 kilo used for launching 53,34cm torpedoes against surface targets over a maximum distance of 8 kilometres. 

Shipyard No. 12 at Danzig, Poland replaced by workshops of the Gdansk Maritime Office according to a CIA report dated 13 March 1952

An item reported that the shipyard No. 12 at Danzig, Poland on the western part of the Slaski quay was replaced by the workshops of the Gdansk Maritime Office (Gdanski Urzad Morski). Their main purpose was repairing tugs, cutters and motor torpedo boats belonging to the Polish navy and the WOP.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, document number CIA-RDP82-00457R010600390007-9

Shipyard No. 3 at Gdansk, Poland used for repairs according to a CIA report dated 13 March 1952

An item reported that the Shipyard No. 3 belonging to the United Shipyards at Gdansk, Poland was the former Wagon Works shipyard. This yard was apparently not used for new building but for repairs of small (fishing) vessels.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, document number CIA-RDP82-00457R010600390007-9

The Shipyard No. 2 at Gdansk, Poland according to a CIA report dated 13 March 1952

An item reported that the shipyard No. 2 belonging to the United Shipyards at Danzig, Poland was the former Schichau Shipyard consisting of 6 slips numbered from the north to the south. All ships were used except for the sixth one. On each of the slips No.’s 1 and 2 was a 3.000 ton merchant ship under construction; the one on slip No. 1 nearing completion. On slip No. 3 was a merchant ship around 4.000 ton and on slip No. 4 of around 5.000 ton under construction. On slip No. 5 was the keel laid down of a merchant ship of which the tonnage was yet not known. In an addition to the original text was said that at this slip the 2.500 tons measuring Zaporzhe [Zaporozhye?] was launched built for the Soviet Union.

The same shipyard built the 4.000 tons merchant ship ss Gdansk, Gdynia, Lodz and Warszawa now to be completed. The Warszawa was dry docked for painting hull and placing of the screw. The bridges over the first four slips were with 60 metres lengthened landwards. To each bridge were two2-5 ton mobile cranes built by the Elblag Shipyard added. In the summer were the building of two machine workshops in the north part of the shipyard standing completed and was started with the building of several more building in the same area.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, document number CIA-RDP82-00457R010600390007-9

The Shipyard No. 1 at Gdansk, Poland according to a CIA report dated 13 March 1952

An item reported that the shipyard No. 1 belonging to the United Shipyards at Gdansk, Poland was the former Danzig Shipyard. A new slip was at that moment under construction. The 2.500 ton Kriwoj Rog built for the Soviet Union was now being fitted out. There were several fishing trawlers measuring around 800 tons built by this shipyard. As ship’s names were given Radunia, San, Nysa and the Dalmor 1-6 belonging to the Bug-class with a deadweight of around 670 tons.

A second item dealing with this shipyard reported that a tanker with a gross tonnage of around 8.000 was refitted and to be added to the Polish merchant fleet. Furthermore were several nay trawlers repaired and 4 navy tugs under construction.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, document number CIA-RDP82-00457R010600390007-9

Tuesday, 20 February 2018

British torpedo gunboat HMS Spanker 1888-1920

Noord-Hollands Archief. Original url
Visiting IJmuiden, Netherlands April 1911

Of the Sharpshooter-class. Laid down by Devonport Dockyard, England on 12 April 1888, launched on 22 February 1889, commissioned on 17 October 1890, reclassified as minesweeper in 1909 and sold to the Cornish Salvage Company, Ilfracombe to be broken up on 20 March 1920.

Displacement 735 tons and as dimensions 70 (between perpendiculars)-74 (over all) x 8,2 x 2,59 metres or 230-242 x 27 x 8.6 feet. Machinery consisted of 2 tripe expansion steam engines and locomotive boilers (replaced between 1895-1898 by Du Temple boilers) and supplying via 2 screws 2.500ihp (natural draught)-3.600ihp (forced draught) allowing a speed of 19 knots and a range of 2.500 nautical miles with a speed of 10 knots. Her crew numbered. Original armament consisted of 5-36cm/14” torpedo tubes, 2-12cm/4.7” quick firing guns and 4-3pd guns. After her conversion into a minesweepers were the torpedo tubes removed and was she fitted out with minesweeping gear. 

French privateer l’Espérance of Dunkirk 1709

Commanding officer Asselin Claissen.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

French privateer l’Espérance 1711

Commanding officer Pierre Desprez. Measurement 35 tons, armament of 4 guns and 4 swivels and a crew numbering 12 men.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

French privateer l’Entreprenante of Dunkirk 1710

Commanding officer Pierre Clou. Measurement 110 tons and a crew numbering 10 men.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925

The Bulgarian revolutionaires lead by Hrisot Botev hijacking the Austrian river steamship Radetzki according to the Dutch newspaper Leeuwarder courant dated 8 December 1876



National Museum, Veliko Tarnovo, Bulgaria

An item referred to tidings received from Belgrade reporting that Serbian policemen searched the Austrian mail boat Radetzki releasing the Bulgarian refugees sent with the help of the police towards Galatz, Romania. The demand of her master to let the refugees on board of his ship was neglected by the Serbians. Another Dutch newspaper De Maasbode dated 10th December reported that the Austrian representative at Belgrade was ordered to demand complete satisfaction for the violation of the borders by the Serbian police when attacking the Radetzki. To support this command were two monitors sent from Semlin. De Tijd dated 21 June 1876 reported that the Bulgarian gang which recently captured the Austrian steamship Radetzki with the intention to call for a uprising in Bulgaria was defeated by the Turkish.

Built at Obuda, Hungary in 1851 for passengers transport on the Danube between Orsova, Austria-Hungary and Galato, Romania. Was hijacked by Bulgarian revolutionaries when she Bechet [Romania] lead by the poet Hristo Botev to pass the borders without alarming the Ottoman or Romanian governments. The gang was transported to Kozioduy where she was disembarked without spoiling any blood. So the items in the Dutch newspapers were partly not the truth. Hristo Botev (27 December 1847 Kalofer, Bulgaria-20 May 1876 Vola Peak, Vratsa Mountain) and most of his men were indeed killed by Ottoman troops. 

French privateer la Reconnaissance of Dunkirk 1708

Commanding officer Gavois. Measurement 200 tons, armament of 26 guns and a crew numbering 102 men and 9 boys.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

Dutch chialoup Winthont around 1683

Of the Dutch East Indies Company. Used at Batavia, Dutch East Indies but was to be sent instead of the Swarte Pot towards Palembang, Dutch East Indies.

Source
Archive Dutch East Indies Company (VOC), National Archive, The Hague inventory number 11250. List of all ships in <1683-1684<. 

Dutch small ship Bombain around 1683

Of the Dutch East Indies Company. Built of Kiaten timber. Allowed to be used by the king of Bantam. Already undergone some repairs but needed more.

Source
Archive Dutch East Indies Company (VOC), National Archive, The Hague inventory number 11250. List of all ships in <1683-1684<. 

Dutch yacht Palliacatte around 1683

Of the Dutch East Indies Company. Lying at Batavia, Dutch East Indies. New. Built from Kiaten timber, measured around 40 last and expected to serve foq uite a long time.

Source
Archive Dutch East Indies Company (VOC), National Archive, The Hague inventory number 11250. List of all ships in <1683-1684<. 

Dutch yacht Javaanse Bode around 1683

Of the Dutch East Indies Company. Lying at the island Onrust, Dutch East Indies to be repaired. Bought at Japara in 1678 and destined towards Banda, Dutch East Indies where she was to served for quite some time as expected.

Source
Archive Dutch East Indies Company (VOC), National Archive, The Hague inventory number 11250. List of all ships in <1683-1684<. 

Monday, 19 February 2018

British Royal Navy founding floatplane base at Bermuda according to the Dutch newspaper Marineblad dated 1936 no. 2

An item referred to the magazine le Yacht dated 28 December 1935 reporting that the work started establishing a new floatplane base at Bermuda to b realized within 7 months. Costs 47.000 pound sterling.

USA increased the number of naval air station in the Pacific according to the Dutch newspaper Marineblad dated 1936 no. 2

An item referred to the magazine Marine Rundschau dated January 1936 reporting that the USA increased the number of naval air station in the Pacific in west and south west direction namely on Midway, Johnstone, Wake and Palmyra, Jervis, Howland, Baker and Swainswere. 

Dutch ocean going tug Poolzee sold towards Greece and renamed Marigo Matsas according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 4 November 1932

Source Kon. Mij. De Schelde Archive Machinefabriek en Ketelmakerij 506.182

An item reported that the Dutch ocean going tug Poolzee was sold by L. Smit&Co.’s Sleepdienst, Rotterdam, Netherlands to the Fa. Loucas Matsas&Sons, Piraeus, Greece for around 1.000 pound sterling. She was built by L. Smit&Zn., Kinderdijk, Netherlands in 1900. Horsepower 750ihp and of 304 gross register tons. The edition dated 2 December 1932 reported that she was renamed Marigo Matsas.(1)

Note
1. In 1930 call sign PQKR/POUV, dimensions 134,6 x 27.7 x 12.10 (hold) feet. Engine by the Kon. Mij. De Schelde, Vlissingen, Netherlands ordered on 20 January 1899, arrived on 12 February 1900 and departed on 5 April 1900. 

British motor launch HMS ML175 1940-1946

Noord-Hollands Archief. Original url

Motor Launch of the Fairmile B class motor launches, building ordered in January 1940. Built by James A. Silver Ltd., Dumbarton, Scotland, commissioned on 20 January 1941 and in May 1946 to be disposed. Displacement 85 tons and as dimensions 112 x 18.3 x 6 feet. Horsepower 1.200bhp. 

Dutch screw steam trawler Christina Catharina (IJM 3)sold within the Netherlands and renamed Bloemendaal according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 2 December 1932

An item reported that the Dutch steel built screw steam trawler Christina Catharina (IJM 3) was sold by the Visscherij Maatschappij Aneta, Ijmuiden, Netherlands to Lansdorp&Kuhn, Ijmuiden and renamed Bloemendaal. Built by the Stettiner Oderwerk A.G., Stettin, Germany in 1917. Of 241,94 gross register tons. 

Dutch survey vessel Zr. Ms. Blommendal cruising in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-Bode dated 20 August 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 19th reported the arrival of the Dutch survey vessel Zr. Ms. Blommendal captain Krayenhoff van de Leur coming from Banca, Dutch East Indies.(1)

Note
1. Sail schooner brig, building costs ƒ 119.000,00, on stocks at the shipyard of Huygens&van Gelder, Amsterdam, Netherlands on 10 July 1881, launched 1882, commissioned at Onrust, Dutch East Indies on 11 January 1883, decommissioned on 29 August 1899, became pilot station ship on the river of Palembang, Dutch East Indies, displacement 300 tons and as dimensions 28,5 x 8,5 x 4,22 metres, an armament of 2 medium rifles 7cm guns and a crew numbering 71 men (1888: 29 Europeans, 42 natives). 

British ship Asia arrived in the Dutch East Indies coming from the USA according to the Dutch newspaper Java-Bode dated 20 August 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 19th reported the arrival of the British ship Asia master Hilton coming from New York, USA. Shipping agents Handelsvereeniging “Amsterdam”. 

Dutch minesweeper Hr. Ms. (ex-Kalgoorlie 1942-1946) Ternate 1946-1961

Noord-Hollands Archief. Original source

Pennants switched regularly MV16 since 15 July 1946, PK3 since 15 September 1946, P since 15 January 1947, M816 since 15 October 1950 and F812 since 15 October 1952. Part of the Batjan- class or Ambon-class consisting Ambon, Banda, Batjan, Boeroe, Ceram, Morotai, Ternate and Tidore of the as part of the Australian Bathurst-class ocean going minesweepers. During the Second World War used as escort vessels and corvettes. Since 1947 were the ships used as patrol vessels, since 1950 classified as minesweepers but instead again used for patrol tasks in the waters of Netherlands New Guinea and in the Netherlands Antilles and Surinam and for the fishery protection in Dutch territorial waters. Since 1952 classified as frigates.

Laid down by Broken Hill, Whyalia, Australia on 25 July 1940 and launched on 7 August 1941. The former HMAS Kalgoorlie (J. 192) of the Royal Australian Navy. Commissioned as the HMS Kalgoorlie of the Royal Netherlands Navy at Melbourne, Australia on 8 May 1946, departed towards Makassar, Dutch East Indies on 28 June 1946, renamed and commissioned as the Hr. Ms. Termate on 12 August 1946. Since 1956 added to the Technical Training of the Royal Netherlands Navy (TOKM) at Amsterdam, Netherlands and sold on 21 September 1961 to be broken up. 

French privateer la Surprenant of Dunkirk 1711

Commanding officer Toussaint Gavelle. Measurement 28 tons, armament of 4 guns and 4 swivels and a crew numbering 47 men.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

French privateer la Subtile of Dunkirk 1706

Commanding officer Toussaint Gavelle.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

French privateer le Furet of Dunkirk 1708

Commanding officer Jacques Dunes. Measurement 4 tons, armament of 4 swivels and a crew numbering 18 men.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

French privateer la Fortune of Dunkirk 1711

Commanding officer Du Guay. Armament of 26 guns and a crew numbering 170 men.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

French privateer la Tour de Montfort of Dunkirk 1703

Commanding officer Cornil Eldersen.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

Dutch motor lugger Burgemeester Schokking (KW 65) sold within the Netherlands according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 2 December 1932

An item reported that the Dutch steel built motor lugger Burgemeester Schokking (KW 65) of 103,62 gross register tons and built by Fa. Gebr, Boot, Leiderdorp, Netherlands in 1912 was sold by Gebr. Van der Plas, Katwijk aan Zee to Parlevliet’s  Oliehandel N.V., Ijmuiden, Netherlands. 

Sunday, 18 February 2018

American heavy cruisers to be tested thoroughly during manoeuvres according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1935 no. 4

Pensacola-class

Northampton-class

New Orleans-class

An item referred to the magazine le Yacht dated 11 May 1935 reporting that during the large manoeuvres between 3 May and 10 June the modified 10.000 tons cruisers were to be tested thoroughly. The first range of 8 ships already needed intensive modifications. Recently was the aft ship strengthened to decrease the vibrations. Furthermore was the heavy armament of 9/10-20,3cm/8” guns blamed for the heavy lurching. The placed ballast seemed not to have solved the problem. Of the modifications used for the seven newest A-cruisers laid down since 1930 were high expectations.(1)

Note
1. The Pensacola-class consisting of the Pensacola and Salt Lake City with a displacement of 9.100 (standard)-11.413 (full load) long tons and an armament of 10-20,3cm/8” guns laid down between 1926-1927, preceded by the St. Louis-class light cruisers built between 1902-1906 and succeeded by the Northampton-class heavy cruisers with a displacement of 9.200 tons and an armament of 3x3-20,3cm/8” guns, consisting of the Northampton, Chester, Louisville, Chicago, Houston and Augusta and all laid down in 1928, succeeded by the Portland-class consisting of the Portland and Indianapolis, both laid down in 1930with a displacement of 9.960-10.100 tons and an armament of 3x3-10,2cm/8” guns and succeeded by the New Orleans-class consisting of the New Orleans, Astoria, Minneapolis, Tuscaloosa, San Francisco, Quincy and Vincennes with a displacement of 10.110-12.663 (loaded) tons and an armament of 3x3-20,3cm/8” guns. 

Japan started with building fourth Mogami-class cruiser according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad 1934 no. 7

The Mogami. Dutch magazine Onze Vloot dated June 1936, p. 79, drawing by E.Th. Poppe

An item referred to the magazine Schiffbau dated 15 October 1934 reporting that in Japan was started with the building of the fourth unit of the 8.500 ton Mogami-class cruisers.(1)

Note
1. This must be the Humano of the Mogami-class heavy cruisers consisting of the Mogami, Mikuma, Suzuya and Kumano. Laid down by Kawasaki Shipyards, Kobe, Japan on 4 August 1934, launched on 15 October 1936, completed on 31 October 1937 and sunk during an American air attack at Santa Cruz, Luzon, Philippines on 25 November 1944. Displacement was actually 13.660 tons (full load). 

USA planning aircraft bases on Guam, Wake and Midway according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad 1934 no. 7

An item referred to the newspaper Washington Herald dated 6 September 1934 reporting that the US navy planned to strengthen Guam, Wake and Midway and founding their aircraft bases which could be used as so-called stepping stones in the Pacific. It this manner became it possible to cross the Pacific starting at Hawaii in steps of 1.200 miles. If the temporarily naval conference at London, England failed was the expectation that a definitive proposal would be sent to the Congress. 

Liberian bulk carrier Fiora Topic 2015-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 3 February 2018

Marshall Islands-flagged, IMO 9728461, MMSI 538006287 and call sign V7LK8. Built on 8 July 2015 2015 as the Liberia-flagged, homeport Monrovia, Liberia Namura 401 by Namura Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Imari, Japan. Operated by Marfin Management S.A.M., Monaco and head owned by Albro Navigation Company Inc., Monrovia, Liberia. 

French privateer la Volante of Dunkirk 1709

Commanding officer Jacques Desmellier. Measurement 10 tons, armament of 4 swivels and a crew numbering 27 men.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

French privateer Le Mars of Dunkirk 1711

Commanding officer Louis La Cité Danican. Armament of 56 guns and a crew numbering 541 men. Fitted out for the voyage towards Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

French privateer le Philippe V 1711

Commanding officer Charles Laferre of Calais. Armament of 10 guns and a crew numbering 60 men.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

French privateer l’Atalante 1711

Commanding officer Louis-Francois Lallies of Calais.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

French privateer la Palme of Dunkirk 1709

Commanding officer Jacques le Roy. Measurement 10 tons, armament of 1 gun and 4 swivels and a crew numbering 28 men and 3 boys.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

British offshore supply ship (ex-Fugro Symphony 2011-2017) Global Symphony 2017-



Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 15 February 2018

Bahamas-flagged, homeport Nassau, IMO 9492581, MMSI 311049100 and call sign C6YY3. In October 2017 bought the Global Marine Group the cable laying department of the Dutch firm Fugro including the Fugro Symphony. Ex-Fugro Symphony owned and managed by Fugro Rovtech, Aberdeen, Scotland. Built by BMV Laksevaag, Bergen, Norway in 2011. 

Dutch motor clipper ship Ebenhaezer sold within the Netherlands according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 5 May 1933

An item reported that the Dutch motor clipper ship Ebenhaezer of 155 tons and built by Van Goor, Meppel, Netherlands in 1917 was sold by master J. Groenwold, Delfzijl, Netherlands to master Harmsen, Groningen, Netherlands. 

Dutch steel built motor lugger Hyacinth sold within the Netherlands according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 8 March 1934

An item reported that the Dutch steel built motor lugger Hyacinth was sold by the shipping company C. v.d. Toorn Jr., Scheveningen, Netherlands to the firm J.J. v.d. Toorn Azn., Scheveningen, Netherlands. 

Dutch ocean going tug (ex-Jacob van Heemskerck) Gele Zee sold towards the Soviet Union according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 22 March 1934

An item reported that the Dutch ocean going tug (ex-Jacob van Heemskerck) Gele Zee built by Jonker&Stans, Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands in 1921 with a horsepower of 1.100ihp was sold by L. Smit&Co.’s Internationale Sleepdienst, Rotterdam, Netherlands to Sovtorgflot, Russia.(1) According to the edition dated 17th May renamed Tainfun.

Note
1. Call sign NSWL/PEHD, 515 gross tons, 63 net tons and as dimensions 151.5 x 29.1 x 14.0 (hold) feet. 

Dutch ocean going tug (ex-Gelderland) Java Zee sold towards the Soviet Union according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 22 March 1934

An item reported that the Dutch ocean going tug (ex-Gelderland) Java Zee built by Jonker&Stans, Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands in 1921 with a horsepower of 1.000ihp was sold by L. Smit&Co,’s Internationale Sleepdienst, Rotterdam, Netherlands to Sovtorgflot, Russia.(1) According to the edition dated 17th May renamed Chernomor.

Note
1. Call sign PFJQ/PFCF, 449 gross tons, 66 net tons and as dimensions 144.10 x 27.4 x 13.5 (hold) feet.

Dutch steamship (ex-Merwede) Amstelstroom sold towards Iceland according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 22 March 1934

An item reported the sale of the Dutch steamship (ex-Merwede) Amstelstroom of 1.568 and 935 net tons and built in 1919 by the Haarlemsche Scheepsbouw Maatschappij, Haarlem, Netherlands by the N.V. Hollandsche stoomboot Maatschappij, Amsterdam, Netherlands to an Icelandic shipping company. She was to be fitted out with a new tweendeck by Verschure&Co.’s Scheepswerf en Machinefabriek, Amsterdam, Netherlands.(1)

Note
1. Call sign NDCW, dimensions 271.8 x 36.8 x 17,5 (hold) feet, horsepower 1.400ihp  and deadweight 1.989 tons. 

Saturday, 17 February 2018

Preliminary design for American battleships USS Pennsylvania (BB38) and Arizona (BB-39) dated 3 September 1912

Nevada-class

Design Pennsyvania-class dated 3 eptember 1912

Pennsylvania-class

USS Arizona
New Mexico

Compared to earlier design was chosen for an internal bulkheads instead for the shell when dealing with the underwater armour. This design dated 24 August but finished on 3rd September was used for building the American battleships USS Pennsylvania (BB 38) (1) and the Arizona (BB-39).(2).

Displacement 31.400 tons and as dimensions 600 (waterline) x 97.0½ (outside armour) x 28.10 (mean draft) feet. Longitudinal coefficient .629. Normal displacement of 31.400 tons: hull complete 13.390 tons, hull fittings 1.293 tons, protection 8.422 tons, steam engineering 2.3909 tons, reserved feed and 2/3 supply 2.05 tons, battery 1/658 tons, ammunition and 2/3 ordnance stores 1.310 tons, equipment, 2/3 equipment stores, outfit and 2/3 stores totally. 1.073 tons, oil fuel 2/3 supply 1.548 tons and a margin of 98 tons.

The armament was to consist of 4x3-35,56cm/14”breech loading guns, 22-12,7cm/5” quick firing guns and 4 submerged torpedo tubes. The machinery consisted of turbines and 12 boilers divided over 3 boil rooms. The designed speed was 21 knots and with a speed of 10 knots was the range estimated to be 8.000 nautical miles.

The armour consisted of a main side belt with an width of 17’-4/5/8”., depth below the waterline of 8.11 8/8 feet and a thickness of 13½”x 13½” x 8”. Barbettes were protected by 4½”(light part)-13” (heavy part), gun turrets5”(roof)-9/10“(sides)-18 (port), the conning tower 6” (tower tube light)-16” (proper and tower tube heavy), fire control by 16” and the , uptake protection had a thickness of 13”. Further more were a protective deck and a splinter deck available.

Notes
1. Part of the Pennsylvania-class consisting of the Pennsylvania and Arizona, preceded by the Nevada-class and succeeded by the New Mexico-class. To be built under the 1913 fiscal year was a design asked with 4x3-14” guns, 22-12,7cm/5” guns and a speed of 21 knots and a armour comparable with that of the Nevada-class. At least 10 preliminary designs were proposed of which the 7th was chosen and further worked out. Building ordered on 22 August 1912, laid down by Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company, Newport News on 27 October 1913, launched on 16 March 1915, sponsored by Elizabeth Kolb, commissioned on 12 June 1916, modernized at the Philadelphia Navy Yard 1 June 1929-1931, used during Operation Crossroads nuclear bombs tests at Bikini in July 1946, towed to and decommissioned at Kwajalein Lagoon 29 August 1946, sunk off Kwajalein Atoll on 10 February 1948 and stricken on 19 February 1948.
2. Part of the Pennsylvania-class consisting of the Pennsylvania and Arizona, preceded by the Nevada-class and succeeded by the New Mexico-class. To be built under the 1913 fiscal year was a design asked with 4x3-14” guns, 22-12,7cm/5” guns and a speed of 21 knots and a armour comparable with that of the Nevada-class. At least 10 preliminary designs were proposed of which the 7th was chosen and further worked out. Building ordered on 4 March 1913, laid down at the Brooklyn Navy Yard on 16 March 1914, launched on 19 June 1915, commissioned on 17 October 1916, modernized at the New York Navy Yard in 1929-1931, including replacing her turbines, sunk during the Japanese aircraft on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 7 December 1941, decommissioned on 20 December 1941 and stricken on 1 December 1942. Her wrecks is still visible. Building costs 16.000.000 US dollars.

Source 
The so-called Spring Styles Book 1 (March 1911-September 1925). Naval History and Heritage Command. Lot S-584-023. Preliminary designs prepared by mostly civilians working at the Bureau of Construction and Repair (succeeded by the Bureau of Ships nowadays the Naval Sea Systems Command) under supervision of naval architects of the Navy Construction Corps. A major part of the drawings was presented to the General Board which advices the Secretary of the Navy. 

Dutch yacht Cadirij around 1683

Of the Dutch East Indies Company. Lying at Batavia, Dutch East Indies. Built by the E. I.C. herself on a shipyard along the coast of Java, Dutch East Indies. Departed towards Timor to be used there.

Source
Archive Dutch East Indies Company (VOC), National Archive, The Hague inventory number 11250. List of all ships in <1683-1684<. 

Dutch yacht Tijger around 1683

Of the Dutch East Indies Company. Lying at Batavia, Dutch East Indies. Built in the Dutch East Indies and now repaired at Onrust to be used in the Malayan waters. Could be used for maximum three years.

Source
Archive Dutch East Indies Company (VOC), National Archive, The Hague inventory number 11250. List of all ships in <1683-1684<. 

Dutch yacht Henricus around 1683

Of the Dutch East Indies Company. Lying at Batavia, Dutch East Indies. Well built at a shipyard alongside the coast of Java, Dutch East Indies. Measurement 70 last. Now lying at Onrust for repairs. Expectation was that she still was usable for considerable time.

Source
Archive Dutch East Indies Company (VOC), National Archive, The Hague inventory number 11250. List of all ships in <1683-1684<. 

Dutch yacht Snaauw around 1683

Of the Dutch East Indies Company. Lying at Batavia, Dutch East Indies. Built at the shipyard at Batavia of Kiaten timber. Still to be used as an aviso for some times. Recently sent to Paulo Timoon to search for the ships returning from Japan.

Source
Archive Dutch East Indies Company (VOC), National Archive, The Hague inventory number 11250. List of all ships in <1683-1684<. 

Dutch yacht Bataviase Koopman around 1683

Of the Dutch East Indies Company. Built in the Dutch East Indies. Measurement 70 last. Arrived recently at Batavia, Dutch East Indies from Timor, Dutch East Indies and needed to be keelhauled and her condition to be examined. The expectations were not high while she was quite worse built.

Source
Archive Dutch East Indies Company (VOC), National Archive, The Hague inventory number 11250. List of all ships in <1683-1684<. 

Panamanian oil/chemical tanker Medalta Adventurer 2014-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 12 February 2018

Cayman Islands-flagged, homeport George Town, IMO 9761451, MMSI 319084600 and call sign ZGFB4. Laid down by Minaminippon Shipbuilding Co. Ltd. Ozai Plant, Ozai Plant, Ozai-Oita, Japan with yard number 746 on 22 August 2014, launched on 22 January 2015 and completed on 7 August 2015. Registered owner FGL Minuet Panama S.A., operated by Waterfront Shipping Company Ltd., Vancouver, BC, Canada and managed by MOL Tankship Management (Europe) Ltd. 

Norwegian general cargo ship (ex-MB Thames 1992-1997, Arklow Feith 1997, MB Thames 1997, Arklow Faith 1007-2005) Romi 2005-

Bahamas off Vlissingen, Netherlands 15 February 2018

Nassau-flagged, homeport Nassau, IMO 8922266, MMSI 308874000 and call sign C6US6. Built by Ferus Smit Scheepswerf, Hoogezand, Netherlands in 1992. Ex-MB Thames renamed July 1997, Arklow Feith renamed 16 September 1997, MB Thames renamed 16 September 1997 and Arklow Faith renamed June 2005. 

British steamship Auricula sold towards the Netherlands to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 3 May 1934

An item reported that the British steamship Auricula of 1.200 tons deadweight and built by Mackie&Thomson, Glasgow, Scotland in 1901 was sold by A.H. Smith/United Shipping Company Limited, London, England to the N.V. Holland Scheepswerf en machinefabriek, Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands to be broken up. She was already for some time laid up at Rouaan, France.

Dutch ocean going tug Beverwijk 24 sold towards the Soviet Union and renamed Ewen according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 17 May 1934

An item reported that the Dutch ocean going tug Beverwijk 24 built in 1932 was sold by the firm Van Hattum&Blankevoort, Beverwijk to the Soviet Union and renamed Ewen. Horsepower 450ihp and dimensions 29,20 x 6,50 x 2,85 metres. 

Dutch ocean going tug Beverwijk 25 sold towards the Soviet Union and renamed Moskowo according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 17 May 1934

An item reported that the Dutch ocean going tug Beverwijk 25 built in 1933 was sold by the firm Van Hattum&Blankevoort, Beverwijk to the Soviet Union and renamed Moskowo, Horsepower 450ihp and dimensions 29,20 x 6,50 x 2,85 metres. 

British ponton-dredger Baroness sold within England to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 13 July 1934

An item reported that the British steel built ponton-dredger Baroness of 239 gross tons and built y the shipyard of Smulders, Rotterdam, Netherlands (1) in 1904 was sold by the Great Western Railway Company, London, England to the Messres. W.H. Arnott, Young and Company, Manchester, England to be broken up.

Note
1. A.F. Smulders, Schiedam, Netherlands. 

Dutch tug Zambesi sold to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 24 August 1934

An item reported that the Dutch tug Zambesi of 322 gross tons and built by Jos.L. Meyer, Papendrecht, Netherlands in 1914 was sold by the Vereenigde Nederlandsche Scheepvaart Maatschappij, The Hague, Netherlands to be broken up. At that moment was she berthed at Mombassa, Kenya  with damage. (1)

Note
1. Owned by the Holland Zuid Afrika Lijn, Amsterdam, Netherlands, call sign QCWD/PIWE, horsepower 575ihp, dimensions 132.10 x 25.8 x 12.0 (hold) feet and 68 net tons. Steel built screw steam tug. 

British armoured frigate HMS Resistance 1859-1898 (1899)

Warrior-class

Defence-class

Part of the Defence-class consisting of the Defence and, Resistance, preceded by the Warrior-class and succeeded by the Hector-class. 
Building ordered on 14 December 1859, laid down by Westwood, Cubitt Yown, London, England on 21 December 1859, launched on 11 April 1861, completed on 5 October 1962, commissioned in July 1862, refitted 1867-1868, Mersey guard ship since 1877, decommissioned at Devonport, England in 1880, used as target for testing armour against the effects of torpedoes and gunfire, sold to be broken up on 11 November 1898, sunk underway to the scrap yard in the Holyhead Bay on 4 May 1899 although later salvaged and broken up at Garston, Liverpool, England. 

Displacement 6.170 tons and as dimensions 85,3 (between perpendiculars)-88,9 (over all) x 16,51 x 8,0 metres or 280-291.4 x 54.2 x 26.2 feet. With the use of watertight transverse bulkheads was the hull divided in 92 compartments and further more was underneath the machinery and boiler rooms a double bottom available. Fitted out with a plough shaped ram. Machinery consisted of a 1-2 cylinder 2.329ihp trunk steam engine with 4 rectangular boilers allowing a speed of 10,5 (under sail)-11,4 knots (under steam sea trials on 25 August 1873). With a coal bunker capacity of 460 tons and a speed of 10 knots was her range 1.670 nautical miles. Ship rigged and with a sail area of 2.276 square metres/24.500 square feet. Barque rigged between September 1864-April 1866. The screw could be lifted out of the water while sailing. Armour of wrought iron consisted of a 11,4cm/4.5” thick belt protecting the hull amidships over a length of 42,7 metres/140 feet stretching from upper deck level to 1,6metres/6 feet below the waterline and bulkheads with a back layer of 46cm/18“ teak. Ship’s ends totally unprotected with a result that the steering gear was also unprotected. Original armament consisted of 20-32pd smoothbore guns, 6-17,78cm/7” 110 pd Armstrong breech loading guns and 10-68pd smoothbore guns. In 1868 rearmed and them 14-17,78cm/7” 6.25 ton rifled muzzle loading guns and 2-20,32cm/8” rifled muzzle loading guns. 

German cruiser SMS Gazelle damaged in torpedo attack off the island Rügen according to the Dutch newspaper Bataviaasch nieuwsblad dated 28 January 1915

With our thanks

An item dated Malmö, Sweden 27th reported that a submarine torpedoed the German cruiser Gazelle off the island Rügen. With unknown damage managed the Gazelle to arrive at Sasznitz.(1)

Note
1. Of the Gazelle-class light cruisers consisting of the Gazelle, Niobe, Nymphe, Thetism Araidne, Amazone, Medusa, Frauenlob, Ancona and Undine. Preceded by the Hella and succeeded by the Bremen-class. Builder ordered under the contract name ‘G‘, laid down at the Germaniawerft, Kiel, Germany in 1897, launched on 31 March 1898, commissioned on 15 June 1901, heavily damaged by Russian mines north of Cape Arkoma in the night of 25-26 January 1916, not worth to be repaired and hulked in 1916, served since then as a hulk for minelayers at Danzig, Cuxhaven and since 1918 at Wilhelmshaven, stricken on 28 August 1920 and the same year broken up at Wilhelmshaven

British submarine HMS E 15 lost in the Daradanelles according to the Dutch newspaper Bataviaasch nieuwsblad dated 19 April 1915

An item dated Amsterdam Netherlands 18the referred to an announcement at Constantinople, Turkey reporting the sinking of the British submarine E 15 in the Dardanelles and that 3 officers and 21 sailors of her crew including the former British vice-consul at Constantinople were taken prisoner. Her crew numbered 31 men.(1)

Note
1. Laid down by Vickers, Barrow, England in October 1912, launched on 23 April 1914, completed in October in 1914, run aground on 16 April 1915 and destroyed by British picket boats armed with torpedoes on 18 April 1915. Remaining parts of her still present in 8 metres deep water off Kepez Point. 

British denied Austrian claim to have destroyed a British cruiser according to the Dutch newspaper Bataviaasch nieuwsblad dated 14 June 1915

An item dated Rome, Italy 12th reported that the Austrian claim that a British warship of the Liverpool-class (1) was destroyed was not correct. On last Wednesday she joined an Italian flotilla destroyers for a success raid on the coast of the Gulf of Drino. Afterwards she returned with the Italian vessels to the Italian naval base.

Note
1. This must be the Town-class light cruisers. 

British armoured frigate HMS Defence 1859-1935

Warrior-class

Defence-class

Part of the Defence-class consisting of the Defence and, Resistance, preceded by the Warrior-class and succeeded by the Hector-class. Building ordered on 14 December 1859, laid down by Palmers Shipbuilding and Iron Company, Jarrow, England on 24 April 1861, completed on 12 February 1862, commissioned on 4 December 1861, converted into a floating workshop at Devonport, England in 1890, renamed Indus in 1898 and sold at Devonport to be broken up in August 1935.

Displacement 6.170 tons and as dimensions 85,3 (between perpendiculars)-88,9 (over all) x 16,51 x 8,0 metres or 280-291.4 x 54.2 x 26.2 feet. With the use of watertight transverse bulkheads was the hull divided in 92 compartments and further more was underneath the machinery and boiler rooms a double bottom available. Fitted out with a plough shaped ram. Machinery consisted of a 1-2 cylinder 2.329ihp trunk steam engine with 4 rectangular boilers allowing a speed of 10,5 (under sail)-11,23 knots (under steam sea trials on 25 August 1873). With a coal bunker capacity of 460 tons and a speed of 10 knots was her range 1.670 nautical miles. Ship rigged and with a sail area of 2.276 square metres/24.500 square feet. Barque rigged between September 1864-April 1866. The screw could be lifted out of the water while sailing. Armour of wrought iron consisted of a 11,4cm/4.5” thick belt protecting the hull amidships over a length of 42,7 metres/140 feet stretching from upper deck level to 1,6metres/6 feet below the waterline and bulkheads with a back layer of 46cm/18“ teak. Ship’s ends totally unprotected with a result that the steering gear was also unprotected. Original armament consisted of 20-32pd smoothbore guns, 6-17,78cm/7” 110 pd Armstrong breech loading guns and 10-68pd smoothbore guns. In 1868 rearmed and them 14-17,78cm/7” 6.25 ton rifled muzzle loading guns and 2-20,32cm/8” rifled muzzle loading guns. 

French privateer les Jeux of Dunkirk 1704

Commanding officer Nicolas de Lambert. Measurement 200 tons, armament of 36 guns and a crew numbering 225 men.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

French privateer la Grande Famille of Dunkirk 1709

Commanding officer Francois Lantmeter. Armament of 4 swivels and a crew numbering 18 men.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

French privateer l’Espérance of Dunkirk 1705

Commanding officer Lieven.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

Dutch general cargo ship Tracer 1999-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 15 February 2018

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Amsterdam, Netherlands, IMO 9204702, MMSI 245949000 and call sign PHAC. Owned and managed by Biglift Shipping, Amsterdam, Netherlands. Built by Hudong Zhonghua Shipbuilding Grouep, Shanghai, China in 1999. 

Italian bark Prospero&Davide arrived in the Dutch East Indies coming from the USA according to the Dutch newspaper Java-Bode dated 20 August 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 19th reported the arrival of the Italian bark Prospero&Davide master Olivari coming from New York, USA, shipping agents B. van Leeuwen&Co. 

Russian ship Primus cruising in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-Bode dated 20 August 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 20th reported the departure of the Russian ship Primus master Heine towards Cheribon, Dutch East Indies. 

Dutch East Indies steamship Gouverneur Generaal Loudon cruising in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-Bode dated 20 August 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 20th reported the departure of the Dutch East Indies steamship Gouverneur Generaal Loudon master Presuner towards Telok Betong, Bencul, Padang, Analaboe and Atjeh, Dutch East Indies.(1)

Note
1. Horsepower 190hp, homeport Batavia, call sign TDLS and net capacity 2.434,10 cubic metres/860,10 tons of 2,83 cubic metres. 

British steamship Port Victor underway from the Dutch East Indies towards Egypt according to the Dutch newspaper Java-Bode dated 20 August 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 19th reported the departure of the British steamship Port Victor master Bird underway towards Port Saïd, Egypt for further orders. 

Friday, 16 February 2018

Danish oil/chemical tanker Hafnia Lotte 2017-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 12 February 2018

Malta-flagged, homeport Valletta, IMO 9732694, MMSI 249329000 and call sign 9HA4201. Built by Guangzhou International Shipyard, Guangzhou, Chinas as Guangzhou 13130065 in 2017. Owned and managed by Hafnia Management, Hellerup, Denmark. 

French privateer la Notre Dame de Bon Secours of Dunkirk 1710

Commanding officer Daniel Oedyn. Crew numbering 18 men.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

French privateer le Petit Marc Antoine of Dunkirk 1709

Commanding officer Dominique Pand. Measurement 18 tons, armament of 4 guns and a crew numbering 29 men.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

French privateer la Trompeuse 1711

Commanding officer Jacques de Pautonnier, of Saint Malo. Measurement 50 tons, armament of 6 guns and a crew numbering 74 men.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

Seaplanes of Royal Netherlands Navy visiting the naval air station De Mok. Noorder Buiten Spaarne in July 1928

Noord-Hollands Archief. Source