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Sunday, 19 February 2017

Dutch pilot boat No. 3 for sale according to the Dutch newspaper De locomotief dated 12 November 1888

An advertisement referred to an public auction of Saturday 17 November 1888 at 10.00 o’clock at the navy establishment at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies. 

Dutch advice boat No. 68 for sale according to the Dutch newspaper De locomotief dated 12 November 1888

An advertisement referred to an public auction of Saturday 17 November 1888 at 10.00 o’clock at the navy establishment at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies. 

Italian general cargo ship (ex-Arklow Brook 1995-2005, Rose Brook 2005-) Simona

Civitavecchia, Italy 23 January 2017

Malta-flagged, homeport Valletta, Malta, IMO 9101534, MMSZI 215947000 and call sign 9HGC8 according to marine traffic. According tot maritime connector and shipspottting Rose Brook, ex-Arklow Brook renamed September 2005. Malta-flagged, homeport Valletta, built by Babcock Marine Appledore, Appledore, United Kingdom in 1995. Owned and managed by Technical&Brokerage Services, Napoli, Italy. Company site also calls her Rose Brook. 
Civitavecchia, Italy 23 January 2017

Italian customs service and police vessels

Civitavecchia, Italy 22 January 2017

Italian ro-ro/passenger ship (ex-Europa Palace 2002-2012) Amsicora 2012-

Civitavecchia, Italy 23 January 2016

Italy-flagged, IMO 9220342, MMSI 247322300 and call sign ICUK. Owned and managed by Italiana di Navigazione, Napilot, Italy. Built by Ficantieri Sestri, Genova, Italy in 2002. 

Italian pilot vessel Orsa CV2223

Civitavecchia, Italy 23 January 2016

Dutch screw steamship 2nd class Zr. Ms. Vice-Admiraal Koopman docked and repaired at Surabaya. Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Locomotief dated 19 July 1873

Model rijksmusem Amsterdam, Netherlands. Original source

An item referred to a tiding dated Surabaya, Dutch East Indies dated 8th reporting that last week the Dutch screw steamship 2nd class Zr. Ms. Vice-Admiraal Koopman left the dry dock. She was fitted out with a new stern tube and just like other broken parts were replaced. At the moment were the new shafts inside the ship placed. Next Friday was the crew to be embarked and on the Tuesday 15th was she to perform her trials while berthed, than a trial in the roads and if everything was proved to be alright to go towards Batavia. According to the rumours was she to participate in the blockade of Atjeh [Aceh].(1)

Note
1. Ex-Leeuwarden, call sign GRBS, on stocks at the navy yard at Amsterdam, Netherlands by H.A. van der Speck Obreen 18 October 1856, renamed Vice Admiraal Koopman on 20 May 1857, launched on 29 April 1858, served in the Dutch East Indies, already reported in worse condition with a broken shaft and a weak aft ship with doubts about her decommissioned being condemned and not worth to be repaired on 7 August 1876, sold to be broken up 1877, displacement 1.600 ton, dimensions 56,00 x 11,25 x 5,40 metres, horsepower 250nph/700 ehp allowing a speed of 9 knots, an armament of 11 guns (6 long 30pd guns, 5 rifled 16cm guns) and a crew numbering 140 men. 

Dutch merchant steamship Gouverneur-Generaal ‘s Jacob hired to be used as hospital ship according to the Dutch newspaper Soerabaijsch handelsbladr dated 27 September 1894

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 27th reported that the government in the Dutch East Indies hired from the Dutch shipping company K.P.M. the ship Gouverneur-Generaal ‘s Jacob to be used as second hospital ship for the sick men of the Lombok expedition and to bring them perhaps towards Surabaya, Dutch East Indies.(1)

Note
1. Dutch East Indies-flagged, homeport Batavia, horsepower 200hp, call sign TDMB and net capacity 4.440,33 cubic metres/1.569,02 tons of ,2,83 cubic metres. 

Norwegian bark Jana underway from the USA towards the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 1 June 1889

An item dated 31 May reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer, Dutch East Indies by the Norwegian bark Jana underway from Savannah, USA towards Anjer for orders. 

British bark Annie Stafford underway from the USA towards the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 1 June 1889

An item dated 31 May reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer, Dutch East Indies by the British bark Annie Stafford underway from New York, USA towards Batavia, Dutch East Indies.(1)

Note
1. Master Peck, owned by I.W. Penry, built at Black River, N.S. by McLeod in 1881, dimensions 199 x 38,4 x 23,5 feet and 1.299 tons tonnage. Bark. 

American ship Conqueror underway from the Dutch East Indies towards Hong Kong according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 3 June 1889

An item reported that the American ship Conqueror received orders to go from Anjer, Dutch East Indies towards Hong Kong.(1)

Note
1. Call sign JPQL. Owned by Elijah Williams&Co., built at East Boston, Massachusetts, USA in 1874, dimensions 215.3 x 41.3 x 24.8 feet and 1.540 tons tonnage. 

French sailing corvette with auxiliary steam power La Biche (1846) in 1859

Homeport Cherbourg, France. Laid down at Dunkirk, France in December 1846 and launched on 3 September 1848. Iron-built. M. Belleville manufactured machinery delivered 200 hp. Armed with 4 guns.

Source
Hans Busk. The Navies of the World, London, United Kingdom, 1859. 

French sailing frigate with auxiliary steam power 3rd class la Pomone (1842) in 1859

Homeport Brest, France. Laid down at Lorient, France on 26 October 1842 and launched on 20 June 1845. Machinery manufactured by M. Mazeline delivered 220hp. Armament consisted of 37 guns. Wood-built.

Source
Hans Busk. The Navies of the World, London, United Kingdom, 1859. 

French sailing frigate with auxiliary steam power 3rd class la Clorinde (1843) in 1859

Homeport Cherbourg, France. Laid down at Cherbourg, France on 5 June 1843 and launched on 19 August 1845. Machinery delivered 200hp. Armament consisted of 42 guns. Wood-built.

Source
Hans Busk. The Navies of the World, London, United Kingdom, 1859.

Saturday, 18 February 2017

Swiss passengers ship MSC Splendida 2009-

Civitavecchia, Italy 23 January 2017

Panama-flagged, IMO 9359806, MMSI 357698000 and call sign 3FZI8. Owned and managed by MSC Crociere, Basel, Switzerland. Built by STX France, Nantes Saint Nazaire, France in 2009. 

Italian bunkering tanker Magic Duba 2010-

Civitavecchia, Italy 21 January 2017

Italy-flagged, homeport Napoli, IMO 9594119, MMSI 247296100 and call sign IIFZ2. Owned and managed by Rimorchiatori Laziali, Napoli, Italy. Built by Cantieri Navali Chioggia, Chioggia, Italy. 

Singapore owned general cargo ship Amy C 2006-


Civitavecchia, Italy 21 January 2017


Civitavecchia, Italy 23 January 2017

United Kingdom-flagged, homeport Douglaes or Cowes, Wight. IMO 9331505, MMSI 235010170 and call sign MKWC7. Managed by Carisbrooke Shipping UK, Cowes (Isle of Wight), United Kingdom and owned by Selandia Shimanagement, Singapore. Built by Kyokuyo Shipbuilding&Iron Works, Shimonoseki, Japan in 2006. 

Dutch general cargo ship Balticdiep 2007-

Off Civitavecchia, Italy 16 January 2017

Netherlands-flagged, IMO 9342140, MMSI 246739000 and call sign PCFD. Owned and managed hy Feederlines, Groningen, Netherlands. Built by Bodewes Shipyard, Hoogezand, Netherlands in 2007.



British destroyer HMS Ferret to be used as target according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1909-1910 no. 6

An item reported that the British destroyer Ferret (1) was prepared to be used as a target to investigate what the effect was of firing 7,6cm shrapnel at destroyers.

Note
1. Laid down at Laird, Son&Co., Birkenhead, England in July 1893, launched on 9 December 1893, completed in March 1895 and finally sunk while used as a target. 

American light cruiser USS Pasadena (CL-65) 1943-1972

Cleveland-class

Fargo-class

Laid down by Bethlehem Steel Corporation, Fore River Shipyard, Quincy, Massachusetts, USA on 16 February 1943, launched by Mrs. C.G. Wopschall on 28 December 1943, commissioned on 8 June 1944, decommissioned on 12 January 1950, stricken on 1 December 1970 and sold to be broken up on 5 July 1972. Call sign NBKT.

Cleveland-class consisting of the Cleveland (CL-55), Columbia (CL-56), Montpelier (CL-57), Denver (CL-58), Amsterdam (CL-59), Santa Fe (CL-60), Tallahassee (CL-61), Birmingham (CL-62), Vincennes (CL-64), Pasadena (CL-65), Springfield (CL-66), Topeka (CL-67), New Haven (CL-76), Huntington (CL-77), Dayton (CL-78), Wilmington (CL-79), Biloxi (CL80), Houston (CL-81), Providence (CL-82), Providence (CL-82), Manchester (CL-83), Buffalo (CL-84), Fargo (CL-85), Vicksburg (CL-86), Duluth (CL-87), Anonymous (CL-88), Miami (CL-89), Astoria (CL-90), Oklahoma City (CL-91), Little Rock (CL-92), Galveston (CL-93), Youngstown (CL-94). Buffalo (CL-99), Newark (CL-100), Amsterdam (CL-101), Portsmouth (CL-102), Wilkes-Barre (CL-103), Atlanta (CL-104), Dayton (CL-105), Fargo (CL-106) and Huntington (CL-107). The Newark (CL-108), New Haven (CL-109), Buffalo (CL11), Wilmington (CL111), Vallejo (CL112), Helena (CL113), Anonymous (CL-115), Roanoke (CL-114), Tallahassee (CL 116), Cheyenne (CL117) and Chattanooga (CL118), are usually described as part of the Fargo-class. preceded by the St. Louis and Atlanta-classes and succeeded by the Fargo-class (a modified Cleveland-design. Of the originally 52 planned ships were 9 converted and completed as the Independence-class light aircraft carriers and 2 with an altered design were part of the Fargo-class. There were totally 29 commissioned of which the Galveston was completed as a guided missile cruiser and 5 others later converted into the Galveston and Providence-class guided missile cruisers.

Technical class specifications.
With a displacement of 11.932 (standard)-14.358 (maximum) tons and as dimensions 180 (waterline)-185,42 (over all) x 20,22 x 7,6 (maximum) x 34 (height) metres or 600-608.4 x 66.4 x 25 x 113 feet. The machinery consisted of 4 General Electric geared steam turbines  and 3 Babcock&Wilcox boilers supplying 1000.000 shop allowing with the 4 screws a speed of 32,5 knots. With a speed of 15 knots was the range 8.640 nautical miles. Crew numbered 1.255 men (including 70 officers). The armour consisted of a 8,3cm/3.25”012,7cm/5” thick belt, a 5,1cm/2” thick deck, 12,7cm/5” bulkheads with the gun turrets, barbettes and conning tower protected by respectively 3,8cm/1.5” (rear)-7,6cm/3” (roof and sides)-17cm/6.5 (face), 15cm/6” and 5,7cm/2.25”-12,7cm/5”. For the 4 floatplanes they could take with them were 2 catapults situated on the stern available. Main armament consisted of 4x3-15cm/6” guns /47cal Mark 16 guns and the secondary armament of 6x2-13cm/5” /38 cal anti aircraft guns, 4x4-4cm/1.6” anti aircraft guns, 6x2-4cm/1.6” anti aircraft guns and 21x12cm/0.79” anti aircraft guns. 

British ship N.B. Lewis underway from the USA towards the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 1 June 1889

An item dated 31 May reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer, Dutch East Indies by the British ship N.B. Lewis underway from New York, USA towards Batavia, Dutch East Indies.(1)

Note
1. Dimensions 203 x 39,6 x 23,2 feet and 1.325 tons. Owners N.B. Lewis. Buil at Salmon River, N.S. by J. Albin in 1880. Master Gullison. 

Italian bark Noi cruising in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 3 June 1889

An item reported that the Italian bark Noi received orders to go from Anjer, Dutch East Indies towards Surabaya, Dutch East Indies. 

Dutch bark Tjerima underway from the USA towards the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 8 June 1889

An item dated 6th reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer, Dutch East Indies by the Dutch bark Tjerima underway from New York, USA towards Batavia, Dutch East Indies, where she arrived on the 7th captain Diepenbroeck.(1)

Note
1. Owned by A. Hendrichs&Co., built by Meursing, Amsterdam, Netherlands in 1883, dimensions 188.2 x 36.7 x 21.1 feet and 1.013 tons tonnage. Call sign PTSW. Netherlands-flagged, homeport Amsterdam and net capacity 2.869,87 cubic metres/1.013,07 tons of 2,83 cubic metres. 

American light cruiser USS (ex-Flint 1942) Vincennes (CL-64) 1942-1969

Cleveland-class

Fargo-class

Laid down by Bethlehem Steel Corporation, Fore River Shipyard, Quincy, Massachusetts, USA as Flint on 7 March 1942, renamed Vincennes on 16 October 1943, launched by Mrs. Arthur A. Osborn on 17 July 1943, commissioned on 21 January 1944, decommissioned on 10 September 1946, stricken on 1 April 1966 and sunk while used as a target for missiles in the Pacific near Point Mugi, California, USA on 28 October 1969. Call sign NIXU.

Cleveland-class consisting of the Cleveland (CL-55), Columbia (CL-56), Montpelier (CL-57), Denver (CL-58), Amsterdam (CL-59), Santa Fe (CL-60), Tallahassee (CL-61), Birmingham (CL-62), Vincennes (CL-64), Pasadena (CL-65), Springfield (CL-66), Topeka (CL-67), New Haven (CL-76), Huntington (CL-77), Dayton (CL-78), Wilmington (CL-79), Biloxi (CL80), Houston (CL-81), Providence (CL-82), Providence (CL-82), Manchester (CL-83), Buffalo (CL-84), Fargo (CL-85), Vicksburg (CL-86), Duluth (CL-87), Anonymous (CL-88), Miami (CL-89), Astoria (CL-90), Oklahoma City (CL-91), Little Rock (CL-92), Galveston (CL-93), Youngstown (CL-94). Buffalo (CL-99), Newark (CL-100), Amsterdam (CL-101), Portsmouth (CL-102), Wilkes-Barre (CL-103), Atlanta (CL-104), Dayton (CL-105), Fargo (CL-106) and Huntington (CL-107). The Newark (CL-108), New Haven (CL-109), Buffalo (CL11), Wilmington (CL111), Vallejo (CL112), Helena (CL113), Anonymous (CL-115), Roanoke (CL-114), Tallahassee (CL 116), Cheyenne (CL117) and Chattanooga (CL118), are usually described as part of the Fargo-class. preceded by the St. Louis and Atlanta-classes and succeeded by the Fargo-class (a modified Cleveland-design. Of the originally 52 planned ships were 9 converted and completed as the Independence-class light aircraft carriers and 2 with an altered design were part of the Fargo-class. There were totally 29 commissioned of which the Galveston was completed as a guided missile cruiser and 5 others later converted into the Galveston and Providence-class guided missile cruisers.

Technical class specifications.
With a displacement of 11.932 (standard)-14.358 (maximum) tons and as dimensions 180 (waterline)-185,42 (over all) x 20,22 x 7,6 (maximum) x 34 (height) metres or 600-608.4 x 66.4 x 25 x 113 feet. The machinery consisted of 4 General Electric geared steam turbines  and 3 Babcock&Wilcox boilers supplying 1000.000 shop allowing with the 4 screws a speed of 32,5 knots. With a speed of 15 knots was the range 8.640 nautical miles. Crew numbered 1.255 men (including 70 officers). The armour consisted of a 8,3cm/3.25”012,7cm/5” thick belt, a 5,1cm/2” thick deck, 12,7cm/5” bulkheads with the gun turrets, barbettes and conning tower protected by respectively 3,8cm/1.5” (rear)-7,6cm/3” (roof and sides)-17cm/6.5 (face), 15cm/6” and 5,7cm/2.25”-12,7cm/5”. For the 4 floatplanes they could take with them were 2 catapults situated on the stern available. Main armament consisted of 4x3-15cm/6” guns /47cal Mark 16 guns and the secondary armament of 6x2-13cm/5” /38 cal anti aircraft guns, 4x4-4cm/1.6” anti aircraft guns, 6x2-4cm/1.6” anti aircraft guns and 21x12cm/0.79” anti aircraft guns. 

French sailing frigate with auxiliary steam power 2nd class ;a Zenobie (1828) in 1859

Homeport Rochefort, France. Laid down at Toulon, France in March 1828 and launched on 29 July 1847. Machinery manufactured at La Creuzot delivered 200hp. Armament consisted of 50guns. Wood-built.

Source
Hans Busk. The Navies of the World, London, United Kingdom, 1859. 

French sailing frigate with auxiliary steam power 2nd class la Pandore (1829) in 1859

Homeport Rochefort, France. Laid down at Brest, France on 7 September 1829 and launched on 26 March 1846. Machinery manufactured at Le Creuzot, France delivered 200hp. Armament consisted of 50 guns. Wood-built.

Source
Hans Busk. The Navies of the World, London, United Kingdom, 1859.

French sailing frigate with auxiliary steam power 2nd class la Dryade (1847) in 1859

Homeport Lorient, France. Laid down at Lorient, France on 26 March 1847 and launched on 29 December 1856. Machinery manufactured by M. Mazeline delivered 200hp. Armament consisted of 50 guns. Wood-built.

Source
Hans Busk. The Navies of the World, London, United Kingdom, 1859. 

Friday, 17 February 2017

German inland pusher tug SCH 2414 1984-

Hamburg, Germany 1 November 2016

ENI 05602730. Built by VEB Yachtwerft, Berlin, Germany for account of VEB Binnenreederei GmbH&Co KG, Berlin in 1984. Since 1990 owned by Deutsche Binnenreederei GmbH&Co KG, Berlin. Dimensions 16,50 x 8,15 x 1,57 metres. Fitted out with a 300hp SKL 6VD 36/24-14 engine. 

Danish oil chemical tanker (ex-Overseas Cygnus 2007-2009) Cygnus 2009-

Hamburg, Germany 1 November 2016

Homeport Hong Kong, China, Hong Kong (China) flagged, IMO 9354260, MMSI 477593700 and call sign VRCG3. Built by STX Offshore&Shipbuilding, Jinhae. South Korea in 2007. Ex-Overseas Cygnus renamed December 2009. Owned and managed by Parakou Shipmanagement, Hellerup, Denmark. 

German dredger (ex-Beta Musing 1984, Musing S2 1984-1992, Beta Msusing 1992-2007, Musing 2 2007-?) Martin Friedrich

Hamburg, Germany 1 November 2016

Germany-flagged, IMO 8745876, MMSI 211321160 and call sign DCOP. Built by Oberledinger Maschinenbau, Leer, Germany in 1984. Ex-Beta Musing renamed November 1984, Musing 2 renamed 4 February 1992, Beta Musing renamed 15 November 2007 and Musing S2 renamed March 20.. 

American light cruiser USS Mobile (CL-63) 1941-1959

Cleveland-class

Fargo-class

Laid down by Newport News Shipbuilding and Dr Dock Company, Newport News, Virginia, USA on 14 April 1941, ;launched by Mrs/ Harry T. Hartwell on 15 May 1942, commissioned on 24 March 1943, decommissioned on 9 May 1947, stricken on 1 March 1959 and sold to Zidell Explorations Incorporation be broken up on 16 December 1959 and departed to the ship breakers on 19 January 1960. Call sign NAET.

Cleveland-class consisting of the Cleveland (CL-55), Columbia (CL-56), Montpelier (CL-57), Denver (CL-58), Amsterdam (CL-59), Santa Fe (CL-60), Tallahassee (CL-61), Birmingham (CL-62), Vincennes (CL-64), Pasadena (CL-65), Springfield (CL-66), Topeka (CL-67), New Haven (CL-76), Huntington (CL-77), Dayton (CL-78), Wilmington (CL-79), Biloxi (CL80), Houston (CL-81), Providence (CL-82), Providence (CL-82), Manchester (CL-83), Buffalo (CL-84), Fargo (CL-85), Vicksburg (CL-86), Duluth (CL-87), Anonymous (CL-88), Miami (CL-89), Astoria (CL-90), Oklahoma City (CL-91), Little Rock (CL-92), Galveston (CL-93), Youngstown (CL-94). Buffalo (CL-99), Newark (CL-100), Amsterdam (CL-101), Portsmouth (CL-102), Wilkes-Barre (CL-103), Atlanta (CL-104), Dayton (CL-105), Fargo (CL-106) and Huntington (CL-107). The Newark (CL-108), New Haven (CL-109), Buffalo (CL11), Wilmington (CL111), Vallejo (CL112), Helena (CL113), Anonymous (CL-115), Roanoke (CL-114), Tallahassee (CL 116), Cheyenne (CL117) and Chattanooga (CL118), are usually described as part of the Fargo-class. preceded by the St. Louis and Atlanta-classes and succeeded by the Fargo-class (a modified Cleveland-design. Of the originally 52 planned ships were 9 converted and completed as the Independence-class light aircraft carriers and 2 with an altered design were part of the Fargo-class. There were totally 29 commissioned of which the Galveston was completed as a guided missile cruiser and 5 others later converted into the Galveston and Providence-class guided missile cruisers.

Technical class specifications.
With a displacement of 11.932 (standard)-14.358 (maximum) tons and as dimensions 180 (waterline)-185,42 (over all) x 20,22 x 7,6 (maximum) x 34 (height) metres or 600-608.4 x 66.4 x 25 x 113 feet. The machinery consisted of 4 General Electric geared steam turbines  and 3 Babcock&Wilcox boilers supplying 1000.000 shop allowing with the 4 screws a speed of 32,5 knots. With a speed of 15 knots was the range 8.640 nautical miles. Crew numbered 1.255 men (including 70 officers). The armour consisted of a 8,3cm/3.25”012,7cm/5” thick belt, a 5,1cm/2” thick deck, 12,7cm/5” bulkheads with the gun turrets, barbettes and conning tower protected by respectively 3,8cm/1.5” (rear)-7,6cm/3” (roof and sides)-17cm/6.5 (face), 15cm/6” and 5,7cm/2.25”-12,7cm/5”. For the 4 floatplanes they could take with them were 2 catapults situated on the stern available. Main armament consisted of 4x3-15cm/6” guns /47cal Mark 16 guns and the secondary armament of 6x2-13cm/5” /38 cal anti aircraft guns, 4x4-4cm/1.6” anti aircraft guns, 6x2-4cm/1.6” anti aircraft guns and 21x12cm/0.79” anti aircraft guns.

Dutch steamship 1st class Zr. Ms. Ardjoeno lying at Batavia, Dutch East according to the Dutch news[a[er Nederlandsche staatscourant dated 5 February 1867

An item referred to tidings dated 15th December 1866 dealing with the movements of the ships belonging to the Dutch squadron in the Dutch East Indies. The steamship 1st class Ardjoeno captain lieutenant H.B. Kip lying at Batavia, Dutch East Indies ready for service.(1)

Note
1. Steam warship, call sign GQCK, on stocks at the navy yard at Amsterdam, Netherlands as Pluto on 4 February 1848, launched on 1 or 2 September 1849, renamed Ardjoeno in December 1849, engines manufactured by the N.S.M. (decided 26 August 1847 for ƒ 210.979,00 to deliver on 15 March 1849), trial on 28 April 1850, departed on 28 December 1850 towards the Dutch East Indies, arrived there on 26 May 1851, docked at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands between 28 March-8 June 1854, transferred to the Dutch East Indies Military Navy on 1 January 1868, stricken in 1873, dimensions 56,00 x 10,70 x 4,80 metres, displacement 1.486 tons and a horsepower of 300 hp. 

Dutch paddle steamship 4th class Zr.Ms. Admiraal van Kinsbergen serving in the Dutch East Indies Nederlandsche staatscourant dated 5 February 1867


An item referred to tidings dated 15th December 1866 dealing with the movements of the ships belonging to the Dutch squadron in the Dutch East Indies. The Dutch steamship 4th class Zr.Ms. Admiraal van Kinsbergen lieutenant 1st class jhr. J.H.P. von Schmidt auf Altenstadt would depart on 18th December from Surabaya, Dutch East Indies towards her station at the West coast of Borneo, Dutch East Indies.(1)

Note
1. Paddle steamship 4th class, call sign GQBN, built at the shipyard of the Nederlandsche Stoomboot Maatschappij at Rotterdam, Netherlands but apparently disassembled and assembled at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies in 1853-1854, commissioned on 7 May 1853, docked at Bandjermassing, Dutch East Indies 21 August-15 September 1877, decommissioned 25 December 1877 at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies, condemned, displacement 293 tons and as dimensions 45,72 x 6,50-12,40 (over side wheels) x 1,70 metres, horsepower 70 hp, armament one 30 pd gun and a crew numbering 43 men (1877). 

British 3rd rate HMS Cornwallis underway from the British Indies towards Ceylon according to the Dutch newspaper Java Government Gazette dated 23 March 1816

An item reported the departure from Bombay, British Indies on 27 December 1815 of the British HMS Cornwallis commodore R. O’Brien towards Ceylon. (1)

Note
1. Of the Venguer-class 3rd rate ships of the line, building ordered on 25 July 1810, laid down by Jamsetjee Bomanjee Wadia at the Bombay Dockyard, British Indies in 1812, launched on 12 May 1813. converted into a jetty on 1875, renamed Wildfire in 1916 and broken up in 1957. 

French sailing frigate with auxiliary steam power 2nd class La Bellone (1845) in 1859

Homeport Cherbourg, France. Laid down at Cherbourg, France on 26 August 1845 and launched on 26 March 1853. Machinery manufactured by M. Mazeline delivered 200hp. Armament consisted of 50 guns. Wood-built.

Source
Hans Busk. The Navies of the World, London, United Kingdom, 1859.

French sailing frigate with auxiliary steam power 2nd class la Danae (1827) in 1859

Homeport Brest, France. Laid down at St. Servais, France on 27 September 1827, launched on 28 May 1838 and being fitted out in March 1859. Machinery manufactured M. Mazeline delivered 200hp. Armament consisted of 50 guns. Wood-built.

Source
Hans Busk. The Navies of the World, London, United Kingdom, 1859. 

American light cruiser USS Birmingham (CL-62) 1941-1959

Cleveland-class

Fargo-class

Laid down by Newport News Shipbuilding and Dr Dock Company, Newport News, Virginia, USA on 17 February 1941, launched on 20 March 1942, commissioned on 29 January 1943, decommissioned on 2 January 1947, stricken on 1 March 1959 and sold to be broken up on 12 November 1959. Call sign NAWJ.

Cleveland-class consisting of the Cleveland (CL-55), Columbia (CL-56), Montpelier (CL-57), Denver (CL-58), Amsterdam (CL-59), Santa Fe (CL-60), Tallahassee (CL-61), Birmingham (CL-62), Vincennes (CL-64), Pasadena (CL-65), Springfield (CL-66), Topeka (CL-67), New Haven (CL-76), Huntington (CL-77), Dayton (CL-78), Wilmington (CL-79), Biloxi (CL80), Houston (CL-81), Providence (CL-82), Providence (CL-82), Manchester (CL-83), Buffalo (CL-84), Fargo (CL-85), Vicksburg (CL-86), Duluth (CL-87), Anonymous (CL-88), Miami (CL-89), Astoria (CL-90), Oklahoma City (CL-91), Little Rock (CL-92), Galveston (CL-93), Youngstown (CL-94). Buffalo (CL-99), Newark (CL-100), Amsterdam (CL-101), Portsmouth (CL-102), Wilkes-Barre (CL-103), Atlanta (CL-104), Dayton (CL-105), Fargo (CL-106) and Huntington (CL-107). The Newark (CL-108), New Haven (CL-109), Buffalo (CL11), Wilmington (CL111), Vallejo (CL112), Helena (CL113), Anonymous (CL-115), Roanoke (CL-114), Tallahassee (CL 116), Cheyenne (CL117) and Chattanooga (CL118), are usually described as part of the Fargo-class. preceded by the St. Louis and Atlanta-classes and succeeded by the Fargo-class (a modified Cleveland-design. Of the originally 52 planned ships were 9 converted and completed as the Independence-class light aircraft carriers and 2 with an altered design were part of the Fargo-class. There were totally 29 commissioned of which the Galveston was completed as a guided missile cruiser and 5 others later converted into the Galveston and Providence-class guided missile cruisers.

Technical class specifications.
With a displacement of 11.932 (standard)-14.358 (maximum) tons and as dimensions 180 (waterline)-185,42 (over all) x 20,22 x 7,6 (maximum) x 34 (height) metres or 600-608.4 x 66.4 x 25 x 113 feet. The machinery consisted of 4 General Electric geared steam turbines  and 3 Babcock&Wilcox boilers supplying 1000.000 shop allowing with the 4 screws a speed of 32,5 knots. With a speed of 15 knots was the range 8.640 nautical miles. Crew numbered 1.255 men (including 70 officers). The armour consisted of a 8,3cm/3.25”012,7cm/5” thick belt, a 5,1cm/2” thick deck, 12,7cm/5” bulkheads with the gun turrets, barbettes and conning tower protected by respectively 3,8cm/1.5” (rear)-7,6cm/3” (roof and sides)-17cm/6.5 (face), 15cm/6” and 5,7cm/2.25”-12,7cm/5”. For the 4 floatplanes they could take with them were 2 catapults situated on the stern available. Main armament consisted of 4x3-15cm/6” guns /47cal Mark 16 guns and the secondary armament of 6x2-13cm/5” /38 cal anti aircraft guns, 4x4-4cm/1.6” anti aircraft guns, 8x2-4cm/1.6” anti aircraft guns and 21x12cm/0.79” anti aircraft guns.

Dutch steam corvette Zr.Ms. Prinses Amelia stationed in the waters of the Moluccas, Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Nederlandsche staatscourant dated 5 February 1867

Model Rijksmuseum Amsterdam NG-MC-487.  Original source

An item referred to tidings dated 15th December 1866 dealing with the movements of the ships belonging to the Dutch squadron in the Dutch East Indies. The screw steamship 1st class Prinses Amelia captain lieutenant C.A.L.H. baron van Heeckeren stationed in the waters of the Moluccas.(1)

Note
1. Former ‘kuil’ corvette Borneo, ‘kuil’corvette, on stocks at the navy yard at Rotterdam, Netherlands 30 August 1845, designed by K. Turk, disassembled and transported to the navy yard of Vlissingen, Netherlands in August 1850, renamed Prinses Amalia on 6 August 1850, laid down by P.A. Bruin 29 July 1853, launched as Princes Amelia as corvette with steam power afternoon Friday 12 October 1855, commissioned on 26 May 1856, call sign GQRL, guard ship at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies 1872-1875, condemned and sold on auction at Surabaya for ƒ 20.000 to be broken up on 9 October 1875, building costs ƒ 560.760,53½, dimensions 36,50 x 10,3 x 4,82 metres as Borneo and as Prinses Amelia 49,8 (load line between perpendiculars)-53,6 (foreside prow-aft side rudder stern) x 11 (inner hull) x 4,5(fore)-5,0 (aft) x 5,71 (depth) metres, displacement, 776 (Borneo)-1.350 (Prinses Amelia) tons, 807 tonnage (Prinse Amelia 1874), 16-19 (Prinses Amelia)-28 (Borneo) guns, crew as Prinses Amelia numbering 178 (1874)-207 men, maximum speed under steam 6-7knots and a horsepower of 150 hp. Armament as the Prinses Amelia consisted on gun deck of 12 long 30pd gun no. 2, 4-heavy 2”grenade guns no. 2 and on upper deck 1 long 30pd pivot gun no. 2 and at both sides 1 long 30pd gun no. 2. In 1869 8-long 30 pd guns, 4-20” grenade guns and 4-4pd rifled guns. A so-called water-tube boiler with 176 tubes and with a partly telescopic funnel

French sailing frigate with auxiliary steam power 1st class l’Entreprenante (1829) in 1859

Homeport Rochefort, France. Laid down at Lorient, France on 5 October 1829 and to be launched in 1859. Machinery manufactured by M. Mazeline delivered 250 hp. Armament consisted of 58 guns. Wood-built.

Source
Hans Busk. The Navies of the World, London, United Kingdom, 1859

French sailing frigate with auxiliary steam power 1st class la Renommee (1826) in 1859

Homeport Rochefort, France. Laid down at Rochefort, France on 8 July 1826 and launched on 28 July 1847. Machinery manufactured at Le Creuzot, France delivered 200 hp. Armament consisted 58 of guns. Wood-built.

Source
Hans Busk. The Navies of the World, London, United Kingdom, 1859.

Thursday, 16 February 2017

Anonymous hull numbered PMH 1370 for a work vessel

Terneuzen, Netherlands 11 November 2017

Dutch tug (ex-Multratug 3 2010-2012, Smit Lion 2012-?) Multratug 3

Terneuzen, Netherlands 11 November 2017

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Terneuzen, Netherlands. IMO 9537408, MMSI 24489-607 and call sign PCDB. Built by Damen Shipyard Gorinchem, Gorinchem, Netherlands in 2010. According to Maritime connector ex-Multratug 3 renamed July 2012 Smit Lion owned by Smit International. Rotterdam, Netherlands, managed by URS België, Antwerp, Belgium, Belgium-flagged, homeport Zeebrugge, Belgium and MMSI 205636000. Gross tonnage 484 tons, net tonnage 145 tons, deadweight 276 tons and as dimensions 29,55 (between perpendiculars)-32,14 (over all) x 13,29 (over all) x 6,31 (maximum) metres. Maximum bollard pull 94,7 tons. Speed 13, 7 knots. Owned and managed by Multraship Towage&Salvage, Terneuzen, Netherlands. 

Dutch tug (ex-Nathalie Letzer 1993-2000, Zelzate 2000-?) Multratug 13

Terneuzen, Netherlands 11 November 2017

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Terneuzen, Netherlands, IMO 9034999, MMSI 244870325 and call sign PDCN. Gross tonnage 249 tons, deadweight 184 tons and as dimensions 32,03 (over all) x 9,04 (over all) x 4,65 (maximum) metres. Speed 13,5 knots. Maximum bollard pull  39 tons. Owned and managed by Multraship Towage&Salvage, Terneuzen, Netherlands. According to maritime connector MMSI 205074000, named Zelzate, ex-Nathalie Letzer renamed January 2000. Built by Scheepswerf Van Rupelmonde, Rupelmonde, Belgium in 1993. 

Dutch inland tanker (ex-Synthese 1998-2003) Synthese 1 2003

Terneuzen, Netherlands 11 November 2017

Netherlands-flagged, ENI 0235952, MMSI 244650812 and call sign PD7160. Built as the Synthese for account of Uni Ship Handel&Service GmbH, Hamburg, Germany by H. Grube, Hamburg. Renamed Synthese 1 in 2003 and then Netherlands-flagged. 

Dutch police vessel P58 2001-

Terneuzen, Netherlands 11 November 2017

Of the KLPD department water police. Built by Damen Shipyard, Gorinchem, Netherlands in 2001. 

Russia building aircraft carrier Stalin according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1938 no. 5

With thanks to Gollevainen aloowing us to publish


Russian cruiser Kirov


An item referred to the Proceedings dated May 1938 reporting that the rebuilding of the Soviet navy was such secret that hardly anything was known. The latest tidings reported the launching of the 15.000 tons aircraft carrier Stalin which carried 22 aircraft with her. At the same time was the 8.000 tons cruiser Kirov with a main armament of 9-17,8cm guns and a speed of 38 knots completed. Three cruisers of the same class were under building.(1)


Note
1. The available details differs in the literature. The two Project 71(A) aircraft carriers would have a displacement of 10.600 (standard)-13.150 (full load) tons and as dimensions 195 (waterline) x 24 x 5,88 metres. The machinery would consist of steam turbines supplying 110.000hp allowing a maximum speed of 34-35 knots. Fuel oil bunker capacity 2.550 tons. The armour was to consist of 7,5-10cm thick belt, a 9cm thick deck and with the command centre protected by 5cm. The armament was to consist of 8-10cm anti aircraft guns, 4x4-3,7cm anti aircraft guns, 20-12.7mm anti aircraft guns machineguns. She was to carry 10 reconnaissance bombers and 20 fighters with her, although also is reported 15 fighters and 30 torpedo bombers, all to be launched by 2 pneumatic catapults. Two elevators. Two funnels which could be turned downward just like Japanese carriers. The intention was to use a hull similar to the Chapayev-class of light cruisers. Qua dimensions were these Russian carriers comparable with the British Colossus-class aircraft cruisers. One was to serve in the Baltic Fleet, the other in the Pacific Fleet. Never realized. 

Dutch suction dredger Java arrived at Batavia, Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Schiedamsche Courant dated 7 June 1912

An item reported that at the shipyard Gusto the tiding arrived that the Dutch suction dredger Java departed on 17th March bound for Tandjong Priok, Dutch East Indies arrived yesterday at Batavia, Dutch East Indies.(9)

Note
1. Yard number 419 the Java built for the Department of Colonies. 

American light cruiser USS Santa Fe (CL-60) 1941-1959


Cleveland-class

Fargo-class

Laid down by New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Camden, New Jersey, USA on 7 June 1941, launched by Miss Caroline T. Chavez on 10 June 1942, commissioned on 24 November 1942, decommissioned on 29 October 1946, stricken on 1 March 1959 and sold to the Zidell Explorations Incorporation, Portland, Oregon, USA to be broken up on 9 November 1959. Call sign NWBL.

Cleveland-class consisting of the Cleveland (CL-55), Columbia (CL-56), Montpelier (CL-57), Denver (CL-58), Amsterdam (CL-59), Santa Fe (CL-60), Tallahassee (CL-61), Birmingham (CL-62), Vincennes (CL-64), Pasadena (CL-65), Springfield (CL-66), Topeka (CL-67), New Haven (CL-76), Huntington (CL-77), Dayton (CL-78), Wilmington (CL-79), Biloxi (CL80), Houston (CL-81), Providence (CL-82), Providence (CL-82), Manchester (CL-83), Buffalo (CL-84), Fargo (CL-85), Vicksburg (CL-86), Duluth (CL-87), Anonymous (CL-88), Miami (CL-89), Astoria (CL-90), Oklahoma City (CL-91), Little Rock (CL-92), Galveston (CL-93), Youngstown (CL-94). Buffalo (CL-99), Newark (CL-100), Amsterdam (CL-101), Portsmouth (CL-102), Wilkes-Barre (CL-103), Atlanta (CL-104), Dayton (CL-105), Fargo (CL-106) and Huntington (CL-107). The Newark (CL-108), New Haven (CL-109), Buffalo (CL11), Wilmington (CL111), Vallejo (CL112), Helena (CL113), Anonymous (CL-115), Roanoke (CL-114), Tallahassee (CL 116), Cheyenne (CL117) and Chattanooga (CL118), are usually described as part of the Fargo-class. preceded by the St. Louis and Atlanta-classes and succeeded by the Fargo-class (a modified Cleveland-design. Of the originally 52 planned ships were 9 converted and completed as the Independence-class light aircraft carriers and 2 with an altered design were part of the Fargo-class. There were totally 29 commissioned of which the Galveston was completed as a guided missile cruiser and 5 others later converted into the Galveston and Providence-class guided missile cruisers.

Technical class specifications.
With a displacement of 11.932 (standard)-14.358 (maximum) tons and as dimensions 180 (waterline)-185,42 (over all) x 20,22 x 7,6 (maximum) x 34 (height) metres or 600-608.4 x 66.4 x 25 x 113 feet. The machinery consisted of 4 General Electric geared steam turbines  and 3 Babcock&Wilcox boilers supplying 1000.000 shop allowing with the 4 screws a speed of 32,5 knots. With a speed of 15 knots was the range 8.640 nautical miles. Crew numbered 1.255 men (including 70 officers). The armour consisted of a 8,3cm/3.25”012,7cm/5” thick belt, a 5,1cm/2” thick deck, 12,7cm/5” bulkheads with the gun turrets, barbettes and conning tower protected by respectively 3,8cm/1.5” (rear)-7,6cm/3” (roof and sides)-17cm/6.5 (face), 15cm/6” and 5,7cm/2.25”-12,7cm/5”. For the 4 floatplanes they could take with them were 2 catapults situated on the stern available. Main armament consisted of 4x3-15cm/6” guns /47cal Mark 16 guns and the secondary armament of 6x2-13cm/5” /38 cal anti aircraft guns, 4x4-4cm/1.6” Bofors anti aircraft guns, 8x2-4cm/1.6” Bofors anti aircraft guns and 21x1-2cm/0.79” Oerlikon anti aircraft guns. 

American light cruiser USS Denver (CL-58) 1940-1960

Cleveland-class

Fargo-class

Laid down by New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Camden, New Jersey, USA on 26 December 1942, launched by Miss L.J. Stapleton on 4 April 1942, commissioned on 15 October 1942, decommissioned on 7 February 1947, stricken on 1 March 1959 and sold to the Union Minerals and Alloy Corporation, New York City, USA for 260.689.89 US dollars to be broken up on 4 February 1960 which was executed at Kearny, New Jersey, USA in November 1960. Call sign NADG.

Cleveland-class consisting of the Cleveland (CL-55), Columbia (CL-56), Montpelier (CL-57), Denver (CL-58), Amsterdam (CL-59), Santa Fe (CL-60), Tallahassee (CL-61), Birmingham (CL-62), Vincennes (CL-64), Pasadena (CL-65), Springfield (CL-66), Topeka (CL-67), New Haven (CL-76), Huntington (CL-77), Dayton (CL-78), Wilmington (CL-79), Biloxi (CL80), Houston (CL-81), Providence (CL-82), Providence (CL-82), Manchester (CL-83), Buffalo (CL-84), Fargo (CL-85), Vicksburg (CL-86), Duluth (CL-87), Anonymous (CL-88), Miami (CL-89), Astoria (CL-90), Oklahoma City (CL-91), Little Rock (CL-92), Galveston (CL-93), Youngstown (CL-94). Buffalo (CL-99), Newark (CL-100), Amsterdam (CL-101), Portsmouth (CL-102), Wilkes-Barre (CL-103), Atlanta (CL-104), Dayton (CL-105), Fargo (CL-106) and Huntington (CL-107). The Newark (CL-108), New Haven (CL-109), Buffalo (CL11), Wilmington (CL111), Vallejo (CL112), Helena (CL113), Anonymous (CL-115), Roanoke (CL-114), Tallahassee (CL 116), Cheyenne (CL117) and Chattanooga (CL118), are usually described as part of the Fargo-class. preceded by the St. Louis and Atlanta-classes and succeeded by the Fargo-class (a modified Cleveland-design. Of the originally 52 planned ships were 9 converted and completed as the Independence-class light aircraft carriers and 2 with an altered design were part of the Fargo-class. There were totally 29 commissioned of which the Galveston was completed as a guided missile cruiser and 5 others later converted into the Galveston and Providence-class guided missile cruisers.

Technical class specifications.
With a displacement of 11.932 (standard)-14.358 (maximum) tons and as dimensions 180 (waterline)-185,42 (over all) x 20,22 x 7,6 (maximum) x 34 (height) metres or 600-608.4 x 66.4 x 25 x 113 feet. The machinery consisted of 4 General Electric geared steam turbines  and 3 Babcock&Wilcox boilers supplying 1000.000 shop allowing with the 4 screws a speed of 32,5 knots. With a speed of 15 knots was the range 8.640 nautical miles. Crew numbered 1.255 men (including 70 officers). The armour consisted of a 8,3cm/3.25”012,7cm/5” thick belt, a 5,1cm/2” thick deck, 12,7cm/5” bulkheads with the gun turrets, barbettes and conning tower protected by respectively 3,8cm/1.5” (rear)-7,6cm/3” (roof and sides)-17cm/6.5 (face), 15cm/6” and 5,7cm/2.25”-12,7cm/5”. For the 4 floatplanes they could take with them were 2 catapults situated on the stern available. Main armament consisted of 4x3-15cm/6” guns /47cal Mark 16 guns and the secondary armament of 6x2-13cm/5” /38 cal anti aircraft guns, 4x4-4cm/1.6” Bofors anti aircraft guns, 8x2-4cm/1.6” Bofors anti aircraft guns and 17x1-2cm/0.79” Oerlikon anti aircraft guns. 

Dutch tug Wilhelmina sold towards Italy according to the Dutch newspaper Nieuwe Schiedamsche Courant dated 29 May 1912

An item dated Schiedam, Netherlands 29th reported that the tug Wilhelmina built at the shipyard Gusto was sold by shipbroker Jac. Pierot Jr., Rotterdam, Netherlands was sold towards Salina, Italy and arrived there on the 27th at 10.30 o’clock. 

Dutch dredger Java arrived at Sabang, Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Schiedamsche Courant dated 29 May 1912

An item reported that at the shipyard Gusto the tiding arrived that the Dutch suction dredger Java departed on 17th March bound for Tandjong Priok, Dutch East Indies arrived at Sabang, Dutch East Indies.(9)

Note
1. Yard number 419 the Java built for the Department of Colonies. 

Russia building aircraft carriers Stalin and Vorochilow according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1938 no. 5

With thanks to Gollevainen aloowing us to publish

An item referred to the magazine Revista Marittima dated May 1938 reporting that Russia intended to built a second aircraft carrier named Vorochilow using American designs. The first aircraft carrier Stalin was to be completed on short notice.(1)

Note
1. The available details differs in the literature. The two Project 71(A) aircraft carriers would have a displacement of 10.600 (standard)-13.150 (full load) tons and as dimensions 195 (waterline) x 24 x 5,88 metres. The machinery would consist of steam turbines supplying 110.000hp allowing a maximum speed of 34-35 knots. Fuel oil bunker capacity 2.550 tons. The armour was to consist of 7,5-10cm thick belt, a 9cm thick deck and with the command centre protected by 5cm. The armament was to consist of 8-10cm anti aircraft guns, 4x4-3,7cm anti aircraft guns, 20-12.7mm anti aircraft guns machineguns. She was to carry 10 reconnaissance bombers and 20 fighters with her, although also is reported 15 fighters and 30 torpedo bombers, all to be launched by 2 pneumatic catapults. Two elevators. Two funnels which could be turned downward just like Japanese carriers. The intention was to use a hull similar to the Chapayev-class of aircraft cruisers. Qua dimensions were these Russian carriers comparable with the British Colossus-class light cruisers. One was to serve in the Baltic Fleet, the other in the Pacific Fleet. Never realized. 

American light cruiser USS Montpelier (CL-57) 1940-1960


Cleveland-class

Fargo-class

Laid down by New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Camden, New Jersey, USA on 2 December 1904, launched by Mrs. William F. Carry on 12 February 1942, commissioned on 9 September 1942, decommissioned on 24 January 1947, stricken on 1 March 1959 and sold to the Bethlehem Steel Company to be broken up on 22 January 1960. Call sign NCFV.

Cleveland-class consisting of the Cleveland (CL-55), Columbia (CL-56), Montpelier (CL-57), Denver (CL-58), Amsterdam (CL-59), Santa Fe (CL-60), Tallahassee (CL-61), Birmingham (CL-62), Vincennes (CL-64), Pasadena (CL-65), Springfield (CL-66), Topeka (CL-67), New Haven (CL-76), Huntington (CL-77), Dayton (CL-78), Wilmington (CL-79), Biloxi (CL80), Houston (CL-81), Providence (CL-82), Providence (CL-82), Manchester (CL-83), Buffalo (CL-84), Fargo (CL-85), Vicksburg (CL-86), Duluth (CL-87), Anonymous (CL-88), Miami (CL-89), Astoria (CL-90), Oklahoma City (CL-91), Little Rock (CL-92), Galveston (CL-93), Youngstown (CL-94). Buffalo (CL-99), Newark (CL-100), Amsterdam (CL-101), Portsmouth (CL-102), Wilkes-Barre (CL-103), Atlanta (CL-104), Dayton (CL-105), Fargo (CL-106) and Huntington (CL-107). The Newark (CL-108), New Haven (CL-109), Buffalo (CL11), Wilmington (CL111), Vallejo (CL112), Helena (CL113), Anonymous (CL-115), Roanoke (CL-114), Tallahassee (CL 116), Cheyenne (CL117) and Chattanooga (CL118), are usually described as part of the Fargo-class. preceded by the St. Louis and Atlanta-classes and succeeded by the Fargo-class (a modified Cleveland-design. Of the originally 52 planned ships were 9 converted and completed as the Independence-class light aircraft carriers and 2 with an altered design were part of the Fargo-class. There were totally 29 commissioned of which the Galveston was completed as a guided missile cruiser and 5 others later converted into the Galveston and Providence-class guided missile cruisers.

Technical class specifications.
With a displacement of 11.932 (standard)-14.358 (maximum) tons and as dimensions 180 (waterline)-185,42 (over all) x 20,22 x 7,6 (maximum) x 34 (height) metres or 600-608.4 x 66.4 x 25 x 113 feet. The machinery consisted of 4 General Electric geared steam turbines  and 3 Babcock&Wilcox boilers supplying 1000.000 shop allowing with the 4 screws a speed of 32,5 knots. With a speed of 15 knots was the range 8.640 nautical miles. Crew numbered 1.255 men (including 70 officers). The armour consisted of a 8,3cm/3.25”012,7cm/5” thick belt, a 5,1cm/2” thick deck, 12,7cm/5” bulkheads with the gun turrets, barbettes and conning tower protected by respectively 3,8cm/1.5” (rear)-7,6cm/3” (roof and sides)-17cm/6.5 (face), 15cm/6” and 5,7cm/2.25”-12,7cm/5”. For the 4 floatplanes they could take with them were 2 catapults situated on the stern available. Main armament consisted of 4x3-15cm/6” guns /47cal Mark 16 guns and the secondary armament of 6x2-13cm/5” /38 cal anti aircraft guns, 4x4-4cm/1.6” Bofors anti aircraft guns, 4x2-4cm/1.6” Bofors anti aircraft guns and 17x1-2cm/0.79” Oerlikon anti aircraft guns. 

Dutch dredger Java arrived at Port Said, Egypt according to the Dutch newspaper Schiedamsche Courant dated 17 April 1912

An item reported that at the shipyard Gusto the tiding arrived that the Dutch suction dredger Java departed on 17th March bound for Tandjong Priok, Dutch East Indies left on 14 April Port Said, Egypt.(9)

Note
1. Yard number 419 the Java built for the Department of Colonies. 

Dutch bark Anna Aleida underway from the USA towards the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 24 June 1889

An item dated 21st reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer, Dutch East Indies by the Dutch bark Anna Aleida underway from New York, USA towards Batavia, Dutch East Indies.(1)

Note
1. Built by J.K. Smith, Krimpen a/d Lek, Netherlands in 1886, owner P. van der Hoog, 1.102 tons and as dimensions 205 x 35.1 x 20.9 feet and captain R. Bleeker. 

American light cruiser USS Columbia (CL-56) 1940-1959

Cleveland-class

Fargo-class

Laid down by New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Camden, New Jersey, USA on 18 August 1940, launched by Miss J.A. Paschal on 17 December 1941, commissioned on 29 July 1942, decommissioned on 30 November 1946, stricken and laid up in reserve on 1 March 1959 and sold to be broken up on 18 February 1959. Call sign NICN.

Cleveland-class consisting of the Cleveland (CL-55), Columbia (CL-56), Montpelier (CL-57), Denver (CL-58), Amsterdam (CL-59), Santa Fe (CL-60), Tallahassee (CL-61), Birmingham (CL-62), Vincennes (CL-64), Pasadena (CL-65), Springfield (CL-66), Topeka (CL-67), New Haven (CL-76), Huntington (CL-77), Dayton (CL-78), Wilmington (CL-79), Biloxi (CL80), Houston (CL-81), Providence (CL-82), Providence (CL-82), Manchester (CL-83), Buffalo (CL-84), Fargo (CL-85), Vicksburg (CL-86), Duluth (CL-87), Anonymous (CL-88), Miami (CL-89), Astoria (CL-90), Oklahoma City (CL-91), Little Rock (CL-92), Galveston (CL-93), Youngstown (CL-94). Buffalo (CL-99), Newark (CL-100), Amsterdam (CL-101), Portsmouth (CL-102), Wilkes-Barre (CL-103), Atlanta (CL-104), Dayton (CL-105), Fargo (CL-106) and Huntington (CL-107). The Newark (CL-108), New Haven (CL-109), Buffalo (CL11), Wilmington (CL111), Vallejo (CL112), Helena (CL113), Anonymous (CL-115), Roanoke (CL-114), Tallahassee (CL 116), Cheyenne (CL117) and Chattanooga (CL118), are usually described as part of the Fargo-class. preceded by the St. Louis and Atlanta-classes and succeeded by the Fargo-class (a modified Cleveland-design. Of the originally 52 planned ships were 9 converted and completed as the Independence-class light aircraft carriers and 2 with an altered design were part of the Fargo-class. There were totally 29 commissioned of which the Galveston was completed as a guided missile cruiser and 5 others later converted into the Galveston and Providence-class guided missile cruisers.

Technical class specifications.
With a displacement of 11.932 (standard)-14.358 (maximum) tons and as dimensions 180 (waterline)-185,42 (over all) x 20,22 x 7,6 (maximum) x 34 (height) metres or 600-608.4 x 66.4 x 25 x 113 feet. The machinery consisted of 4 General Electric geared steam turbines  and 3 Babcock&Wilcox boilers supplying 1000.000 shop allowing with the 4 screws a speed of 32,5 knots. With a speed of 15 knots was the range 8.640 nautical miles. Crew numbered 1.255 men (including 70 officers). The armour consisted of a 8,3cm/3.25”012,7cm/5” thick belt, a 5,1cm/2” thick deck, 12,7cm/5” bulkheads with the gun turrets, barbettes and conning tower protected by respectively 3,8cm/1.5” (rear)-7,6cm/3” (roof and sides)-17cm/6.5 (face), 15cm/6” and 5,7cm/2.25”-12,7cm/5”. For the 4 floatplanes they could take with them were 2 catapults situated on the stern available. Main armament consisted of 4x3-15cm/6” guns /47cal Mark 16 guns and the secondary armament of 6x2-13cm/5” /38 cal anti aircraft guns, 8x2-4cm/1.6” Bofors anti aircraft guns and 13x1-2cm/0.79” Oerlikon anti aircraft guns.

Wednesday, 15 February 2017

Dutch general cargo ship Sea Shannon 1998-


Terneuzen, Netherlands 11 November 2017

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Lemmer, Netherlands, IMO 9160047, MMSI 245334000 and call sign PCEF. Built at the Damen Shipyard Bergum, Bergum, Netherlands in 1998. Owned and managed by Amasus Shipping, Farmsum, Netherlands. 

Dutch inland pusher tug (ex-Fijenoord 1974-1984, Eerland 2 1984-1994, Argus 1994-1997, Eerland 2 1997-1999, Balckyard 1999-2010) Hendrik 7 2010-


Terneuzen, Netherlands 11 November 2017

Netherlands-flagged, ENI 02323331, MMSI 244690858 and cal sign PB7137. Built by Deltawerf, Sliedrecht, Netherlands with yard number 26 in 1974. Fitted out with a 480hp GM 16V71 engine. Dimensions 18,85 (original)-19,18 (nowadays) x 5,50 (original)-5,62 (nowadays) x 250 metres. Built as Fijenoord in 1974 for Fijenoord Dok&Scheepswerf, Schiedam, Netherlands in 1974, since 1984 of Smit Internationale Havensleepdiensten BV, Rotterdam, Netherlands, renamed Eerland 2 in 1984 owned by G.J. Eerland&Zn. Sleepdienst&Transport Onderneming, Rotterdam, renamed Argus in 1994 owned by Baltic Marine Contractors, Rostock, Germany, renamed Eerland 2 in 1997 of G.J. Eerland&Zn. Sleepdienst&Transport Onderneming, Rotterdam, renamed Balckyard in 1999 of J.A. Balck Scheepsreparatiebedrijf BV, Rotterdam and renamed Hendrik 7 in 2010 of R.F. van Aerde Sleepdienst, Sas van Gent, Netherlands. 

Swiss inland tanker (ex-Burgundia 1957-1979) Magniola 1979-


Terneuzen, Netherlands 11 November 2017

Switzerland-flagged, MMSI 269057541, ENI 4800310 and call sign HE7541. Built by Ewald Berninghaus, Duisburg, Germany with yard number 747 for accpunt of Phs. Van Ommeren Binnentankvaart BV, Rotterdam, Netherlands in 1957. Registered at Basel, Switzerland on 22 January 2016. Between 2001-2016 Germany-flagged, before also Switzerland. 

Belgian trailing suction hopper dredger (ex-Banjaard 1983-1992, Breehorn 1992-1993, Fast Wil 1993-1995, Fiducia 1995-1998, Teunie W 1998-2003) Argo 1 2003-

Terneuzen, Netherlands 11 November 2017

IMO 8211617, MMSI 246177000 and call sign PEBK. Built 1982 at the shipyard Bijlsma&Zonen, Wartena, Netherlands. Owned and managed by Dranaco, Antwerp, Belgium but Dutch-flagged with as homeport Gouda, Netherlands. Gross tonnage 1.402 tons, summer dead weight 2.284 tons and as dimensions 80 x 11 x 5 metres. Ex-Banjaard 1983-December 1992, Breehorn December 1992-May 1993, Fast Wil May 1993-December 1995, Fiducia December 1995-December 1998 and Teunie W December 1998-September 2003. 

German inland gas tanker (ex-VTH Gas 74 1970-?, LRG Gas 74 ?-2016) Imperial Gas 74 2016-

Terneuzen, Netherlands 11 November 2017

Germany-flagged, homeport Hamburg, Germany, ENI 04008290, MMSI 211493430 and call sign DA5314. Built as VTG Gas 74 by Rheinwerft Walsum, Walsum, Germany for account of Vereinigte Tanklager un Transportmittel GmbH, Hamburg, Germany in 1970. Renamed lrg Gas 74 and in 2016 Imperial Gas 74. 

American light cruiser USS Newark (CL-88) 1940

Cleveland-class

Fargo-class

Building by Federal Shipbuilding and Drydock Company, Kearny, New Jersey, USA cancelled on 16 December 1940.

Cleveland-class consisting of the Cleveland (CL-55), Columbia (CL-56), Montpelier (CL-57), Denver (CL-58), Amsterdam (CL-59), Santa Fe (CL-60), Tallahassee (CL-61), Birmingham (CL-62), Vincennes (CL-64), Pasadena (CL-65), Springfield (CL-66), Topeka (CL-67), New Haven (CL-76), Huntington (CL-77), Dayton (CL-78), Wilmington (CL-79), Biloxi (CL80), Houston (CL-81), Providence (CL-82), Providence (CL-82), Manchester (CL-83), Buffalo (CL-84), Fargo (CL-85), Vicksburg (CL-86), Duluth (CL-87), Anonymous (CL-88), Miami (CL-89), Astoria (CL-90), Oklahoma City (CL-91), Little Rock (CL-92), Galveston (CL-93), Youngstown (CL-94). Buffalo (CL-99), Newark (CL-100), Amsterdam (CL-101), Portsmouth (CL-102), Wilkes-Barre (CL-103), Atlanta (CL-104), Dayton (CL-105), Fargo (CL-106) and Huntington (CL-107). The Newark (CL-108), New Haven (CL-109), Buffalo (CL11), Wilmington (CL111), Vallejo (CL112), Helena (CL113), Anonymous (CL-115), Roanoke (CL-114), Tallahassee (CL 116), Cheyenne (CL117) and Chattanooga (CL118), are usually described as part of the Fargo-class. preceded by the St. Louis and Atlanta-classes and succeeded by the Fargo-class (a modified Cleveland-design. Of the originally 52 planned ships were 9 converted and completed as the Independence-class light aircraft carriers and 2 with an altered design were part of the Fargo-class. There were totally 29 commissioned of which the Galveston was completed as a guided missile cruiser and 5 others later converted into the Galveston and Providence-class guided missile cruisers.

Technical class specifications.
With a displacement of 11.932 (standard)-14.358 (maximum) tons and as dimensions 180 (waterline)-185,42 (over all) x 20,22 x 7,6 (maximum) x 34 (height) metres or 600-608.4 x 66.4 x 25 x 113 feet. The machinery consisted of 4 General Electric geared steam turbines  and 3 Babcock&Wilcox boilers supplying 1000.000 shop allowing with the 4 screws a speed of 32,5 knots. With a speed of 15 knots was the range 8.640 nautical miles. Crew numbered 1.255 men (including 70 officers). The armour consisted of a 8,3cm/3.25”012,7cm/5” thick belt, a 5,1cm/2” thick deck, 12,7cm/5” bulkheads with the gun turrets, barbettes and conning tower protected by respectively 3,8cm/1.5” (rear)-7,6cm/3” (roof and sides)-17cm/6.5 (face), 15cm/6” and 5,7cm/2.25”-12,7cm/5”. For the 4 floatplanes they could take with them were 2 catapults situated on the stern available. Main armament consisted of 4x3-15cm/6” guns /47cal Mark 16 guns and the secondary armament of 6x2-13cm/5” /38 cal anti aircraft guns, to which a large number of 4cm/1.6” and 2cm/0.79” anti aircraft guns were added.