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Tuesday, 21 October 2014

Dutch screw steamship 1st class Zr.Ms. Djambi lying at Batavia, Dutch East Indies waiting for orders according to the Dutch newspaper Nederlandsche staatscourant dated 10 August 1869

Model Rijksmuseum Amsterdam, Netherlands. Original link

An item referred to an official tiding dated 15 June dealing wit the movements of the Dutch warships serving in the Dutch East Indies. The Dutch screw steamship 1st class Zr.Ms. Djambi captain J.E. Ruys was lying in the roads of Batavia ready for duty.(1)

Note
1. Laid down at the navy yard at Amsterdam, Netherlands on 29 December 1858, launched on 31 October 1860, commissioned on 1 June 1861 (?) and finally sold at sold at Cape Town/Simonstad, South Africa for 1.765 pond in 1874. The intention was to remove her engine and to convert her into a sailing vessel. With a displacement of 2.030 tons (A.J. Vermeulen) or a tonnage of 1.083 tons (Parliament papers) were her dimensions 58.00-62,84 x 12,25 x 5,50 metres. Wood-built. The coal bunker capacity of 340 tons allowed a range of 11 days. The horsepower was 250 hp allowing a speed of 8,5 knots. With a crew numbering 212-250 men consisted the armament of 8 long 30 pd guns and 8 rifled 16cm guns. The navy budget discussions for 1867 called her a large flush deck screw steam corvette. The ships of her type were suitable in times of war to secure an open connection between the Netherlands and her colonies, to act as commerce raiders and in the colonies successful act against troop transports and joined by our ironclads to prevent enemy landings. The design was described as a quite heavy armament, sufficient horsepower and good sailing qualities.

Dutch corvette Zr.Ms. Juno bound for the Dutch West Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated 2 June 1842

An item dated Den Helder, Netherlands the 28th reported that the same afternoon the Dutch corvette Zr.Ms. Juno captain lieutenant A. Klein arrived returning from the Dutch West Indies. On board was the director general J.C. Rijk with his family.(1)

Note
1. Corvette 1st class , on stocks at the navy yard at Rotterdam, Netherlands by P. Glavimans 20 June 1833, launched 14 May 1839, docked at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands 29 March-17 April 1841, part of the Indies Military Navy since1 January 1868, guard ship at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies 18 September 1867-25 January 1870, sold at Surabaya on a public auction to the native Aridin for ƒ 16.700,00 on 2 July, dimensions 39,50 x 10,70 x 5,3 metres, 932 tons displacement, 22 (1869: 14 medium 30pd guns)-32 guns and a crew numbering 120 (1869) men.

Naples stopped fitting out warships according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated 29 May 1842

An item dated Naples, Italy the 11th reported that the fitting out of the warships except for one corvette was stopped. The reason was that the problems with the Netherlands was nearly solved.

Proposed strength of the Spanish navy according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated 28 May 1842

An item reported that the Spanish representatives were concept laws discussing dealing with the strength of the navy and the army. The ministers proposed that that the Spanish navy should consist of 1 ship of the line, 4 frigates, 1 corvette, 9 brigs, 8 goelettes, 4 steamboats and 9 smaller vessels. The corps marines was to number 3.360 men and the corps naval artillerists 2.400 men.

Dutch corvette Zr.Ms. Castor arrived at Surinam coming from the Netherlands according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated 12 May 1842

An item dated Middelburg, Netherlands the 11th reported the arrival of the Dutch corvette Zr.Ms. Castor captain lieutenant F.A. Söhngen at Surinam coming from Texel, Netherlands.(1)

Note
1. ‘Kuil’corvette, on stocks at the navy yard at Amsterdam, Netherlands 1830 by P. Schuijt jr., launched 1835, training battery 1849, stricken as an training battery at Willemsoord, Netherlands 1866, public tenders on 30 May 11.00 o’clock at Willemsoord asked for breaking her up, dimensions 36,50 (between perpendiculars) x 10,0 (inner hull) x 4,25 (fore)-4,82 (aft) x 5,39 (depth below main deck), 775 tons displacement and an armament of 28 guns (20-12pd guns or 20-30pd carronades, 8-12pd carronades and 2-6pd guns.

Still crewmembers of the Dutch frigate Zr.Ms. Rotterdam nursed at Riouw for cholera according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated 1 March 1842

An item reported that at Riouw, Dutch East Indies still 12 crewmembers of the Dutch frigate Zr.Ms. Rotterdam were nursed in the hospital suffering from cholera.(1)

Note
1. Frigate 2nd class, on stocks at the navy yard at Rotterdam, Netherlands December 1821 by P. Glavimans Jz, launched 8 June 1826, razeed as a 38 guns frigate 1838, stricken 1862, dimensions 46,21 (loadline) x 11,91 (inner hull) x 5,17 (fore)-5,74 (aft) x 6,41 (depth below maindeck) metres, a displacement of 1.422 Dutch tons and an armament of 38-44-52 (30 short 30pd, 20-30 pd, 2-8pd) guns.

Dutch corvette Zr.Ms. Castor bound for the Dutch West Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated 27 January 1842

An item reported that contrary winds forced the Dutch corvette Zr.Ms. Castor captain lieutenant F.A. Söhngen to return on the 16th in the roads of Texel, Netherlands and that she on the 21th departed again towards the Dutch West Indies.(1)

Note
1. ‘Kuil’corvette, on stocks at the navy yard at Amsterdam, Netherlands 1830 by P. Schuijt jr., launched 1835, training battery 1849, stricken as an training battery at Willemsoord, Netherlands 1866, public tenders on 30 May 11.00 o’clock at Willemsoord asked for breaking her up, dimensions 36,50 (between perpendiculars) x 10,0 (inner hull) x 4,25 (fore)-4,82 (aft) x 5,39 (depth below main deck), 775 tons displacement and an armament of 28 guns (20-12pd guns or 20-30pd carronades, 8-12pd carronades and 2-6pd guns.

Dutch corvette Zr.Ms. Castor bound for the Dutch West Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated 18 January 1842

An item reported that the Dutch corvette Zr.Ms. Castor captain lieutenant F.A. Söhngen departed on the 12th the roads of Texel, Netherlands towards the Dutch West Indies.(1)

Note
1. ‘Kuil’corvette, on stocks at the navy yard at Amsterdam, Netherlands 1830 by P. Schuijt jr., launched 1835, training battery 1849, stricken as an training battery at Willemsoord, Netherlands 1866, public tenders on 30 May 11.00 o’clock at Willemsoord asked for breaking her up, dimensions 36,50 (between perpendiculars) x 10,0 (inner hull) x 4,25 (fore)-4,82 (aft) x 5,39 (depth below main deck), 775 tons displacement and an armament of 28 guns (20-12pd guns or 20-30pd carronades, 8-12pd carronades and 2-6pd guns.

Greek reefer Belgian Reefer 1983-



Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 21 October 2014

Bahamas-flagged, homeport Nassau, IMO 8300365, MMSI 311433000 and callsign C6SQ5. 


Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 17.10 o'clock with low tide, worse weather expected between 00.00 and 02.00 tonight

Monday, 20 October 2014

Greek tanker Amazon Virtue 2014-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 18 October 2014

Greece-flagged, homeport Chios, IMO 9660360, MMSI 241293000 and callsign SVBW7.

Turkish crude oil tanker (ex-Champion 2003-2008) Azerbaijan 2008-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 15 October 2014

Malta-flagged, homeport Valletta, IMO 9252979, MMSI 215410000 and callsign 9HKT7.

Japanese bulk carrier Diamond Queen 2013-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 17 October 2014

Panama-flagged, IMO 9642136, MMSI 373383000 and callsign 3EWM.

German chemical tanker (ex-Meriom Joy 2002-2004) Port Russell 2004-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 18 October 2014

Marshall Islands-flagged, IMO 9223265, MMSI 538090297 and callsign V7FY2.. Ex-Meriom Joy renamed April 2004.

Turkish bulk carrier Yasa H. Mulla 2011-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 18 October 2014

Turkey-flagged, homeport Istanbul, IMO 9442512, MMSI 271042868 and callsign TCMY4.

Dutch screw steamship 4th class Zr.Ms. Bonaire serving as fishery protection vessel according to the Dutch newspaper De standaard dated 26 May 1884

In the dry dock at Den Helder, Netherlands some years go

An item reported the departure of the Dutch screw steamship Zr.Ms. Bonaire from Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands on the 22nd towards open sea for protection of the Dutch fishery.(1)

Note
1. Screw steamship 4th class, laid down at the shipyard of the Nederlandse Stoomboot Maatschappij Fijenoord, Netherlands with yard number 98 on 27 September 1876, launched in the afternoon 0f 12 May 1877, trial on the Haringvliet on Wednesday 26th September, commissioned on 1 May 1880, converted into accommodation ship for the torpedo service at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands 1902, fitted out at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis to be used for the engineers school at Dordrecht, Netherlands, brought back to Hellevoetsluis August 1923, stricken, handed over to the boarding school of the marine academy at Delfzijl, Netherlands and renamed Abel Tasman, out of service in 1988, brought to Den Helder, Netherlands 1996 and since then being restored to retain her original appearance, dimensions 45,00-53,60 x 9,00 x 3,60 metres and a displacement of  850 ton, iron-built and wood-planked and zinc plated, horsepower 90 nhp/410 ehp allowing a speed of 9,2 miles, her crew numbered 84 men and her main armament consisted of 1-15cm gun and 3-12cm guns to which 2-3,7cm revolver guns and 1-12cm mortar were added.

Dutch screw steamship 3rd class Zr.Ms. Het Loo expected to return form the Dutch West Indies according to the Dutch newspaper De standaard dated 11 March 1876

An item reported the expected arrival at Nieuwediep, Netherlands of the Dutch screw steamship Zr.Ms. Het Loo in beginning of May returning from the Dutch West Indies.(1)

Note
1. Screw steamship 3rd class, wood-built, on stocks at the navy yard at Amsterdam, Netherlands 13 May 1858, launched 17 March 1859, commissioned 26 July 1859, docked at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis 26 May-19 June 1865, together with the Zr.Ms. Citadel van Antwerpen present when the Dutch colours at the Dutch Gold Coast was stricken, converted at the navy yard at Willemsoord, Netherlands into artillery training ship and commissioned at Willemsoord 16 September 1876, decommissioned and condemned for services outside the Nieuwediep, Netherlands 8 May 1889, accommodation for artillery training ship 25 September, condemned and replaced by the Zr.Ms. Atjeh 1906, decommissioned 8 November and stricken, displacement 759 tons, dimensions 43 x 9,2 x 4,3 metres, coal bunker capacity 100-200 ton, horsepower 115 nhp/250ehp, speed 7-12 (maximum) miles, range (in 187) 7 days full speed, a crew numbering 86 (1877)-100 men and an armament consisting of 2 rifled 16cm guns, 1-15cm gun and 4-12cm guns.

Dutch screw steamship 1st class Zr.Ms. Leeuwarden dry docked at Vlissingen, Netherlands according to the Dutch newspaper Rotterdamsche courant dated 13 October 1865

An item reported that the Dutch screw steamship Zr.Ms. Leeuwarden entered on the 10th the dry dock at the navy yard at Vlissingen, Netherlands.(1)

Note
1. Screw steamship 1st class, on stocks at the navy yard at Vlissingen, Netherlands, Netherlands 6 December 1859, launched Saturday 13.30 o’clock 19 October 1861, condemned  1886, decommissioned 20 September 1885 and sold at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies for ƒ 26.050 23 January 1886, dimensions 58,00-62,84m (over all) x 12,25 x 5,50 metres, 2.030 tons displacement, 10 guns (10 rifled 16cm guns, 1881: 6-12cm guns, 4 rifled 16cm guns), 212-225 men, 8,5 knots speed and 250 hp horsepower.

Dutch screw steamship Zr.Ms. Citadel van Antwerpen arrived at Hong Kong according to the Dutch newspaper Rotterdamsche courant dated 11 January 1864

An item reported hat the Dutch screw steamship Zr.Ms. Citadel van Antwerpen arrived on 30th October coming from Chefoo, China [Chefoo or Chih-fou nowadays Yantai] at Hong Kong.(1)

Note
1. Screw steam ship 2nd class, on stocks at the navy yard at Amsterdam, Netherlands on 19 February 1856as Dordrecht, launched 1857, renamed Citadel van Antwerpen in 1868, lengthened with 2 metres >1865-1868<, decommissioned 1 January 1878, converted into a hulk to be used during the building of a lighthouse on the Meindertsdroogte, Dutch East Indies in 1878, displacement 1.780 tons, dimensions 56,00 x 11,05 x 5,40 metres, an armament of 13 guns and a crew numbering 180 men.

Sunday, 19 October 2014

German bulk carrier N Schelde 2013-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 16 October 2014

Malta-flagged, homeport Malta, IMO 9596038, MMSI 229323000 and callsign HA3232.

Danish container ship Edith Maersk 2007-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 16 October 2014

Denmark International Register-flagged, homeport Roskilde, IMO 9321548, MMSI 220501000 and callsign OXOR2.

British LPG tanker Navigator Saturn 2000-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 16 October 2014

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 19 October 2014

Liberia-flagged, homeport Monrovia, IMO 9177569, MMSI 636011289 and callsign ELYC9.

British screw steam ship of the line HMS Agamemnon 1849-1870

The HMS Agamemnon in the harbour of Deptford already partly dismantled. Left of here is HMS Dreadnought visible. Drawn by Sir Francis Seymout-Haden, 1870.
Collection Rijksmuseum Amsterdam, Netherlands. Original url

Her building was ordered on 3 July 1849, designed by Edye and Watts using Edye’s design dated 15 December 1847 for the James Watt, laid down at the Woolwich dockyard in November 1849, launched on 22 May 1852, completed in 1852, building costs 141.299 pound sterling, sea trial in Stokes Bay on 3 May 1853, fitted out as a cable layer in 1857, paid off in 1862 and finally sold to W.H. Moore to be broken up on 12 May 1870. Two-decker. With a builders measurement of 3.074 45/94 ton, a displacement of 4.614 tons were her dimensions 58,90 (keel)-70,18 (over all) x 16,87 (extreme) x 6,91 (fore)-7,29 (aft) x 7,47 metres or 193’3”-230’3” x55’4”x 22’8”-23’11” x 24’6”.  The John Penn and Sons engine delivered 600  nhp/2.268 ihp allowing a speed of 11,243 knots while under steam on the measured mile during her sea trial. Her crew numbered 860 men. The armament consisted of 34-8”guns, 56-32pds and 1-68pdr.

Australian heavy cruiser HMAS Shropshire (1926) 1943-1955

HMAS Shropshire ready for departure from Sydney, Australia to be broken up
Name photographer unknown/Anefo, 1954. Beeldbank Nationaal Archief. CC-BySa

Heavy cruiser of the London-class which was a subclass of the County-class cruisers. Her building by the British Royal navy was ordered on 17 March 1926, laid down at the shipyard of William Beardmore and Company, Dalmuir, Scotland on 24 February 1927, launched on 5 July 1928, completed on 12 September 1929, commissioned on 24 September in the Royal British Navy (pennants 73,later 83 and 96), decommissioned on 23 December 1942, commissioned in the Royal Australian Navy on 20 April 1943, decommissioned on 10 November 1949, sold for 82.500 pounds stirling to Thomas ward Limited, Sheffield, England on 16 July 1954. Departed Sydney while towed by the Dutch tug Oostzee towards Dalmuir, Scotland, after arrival started on 20 January 1955 which was later completed at Troon starting on 19 September.

With a displacement of 9.750 (standard)-13.315 (full load) tons were her dimensions 193 x 20 x 6,4 metres or 633’x 66’x 21’. The Parsons geared turbines and 8 3-dums Admiralty boilers delivered 80.000 shp allowing a speed of 32 knots with a range of 10.862 (speed 12 knots)-4.715 (speed 31,5 knots) nautical miles with the bunker capacity of 3.210 tons of fuel oil. She was also armoured consisting of a 11cm/4.5” thick belt while the internal boiler room sides were protected by 10cm/4” with further more a 3,49cm/1.375” thick deck, sides of turrets and bulkheads with a thickness of 2,5cm/1” and the magazine box protected by 2,5-10,2cm/1-4” thick armour. The armament while in Australian service consisted in 1945-1946 of 4x2-20,3cm/8” guns, 4-10,16cm/4” quick firing guns, 3x3pd eight barrel pom poms,2-2cm/0.8” dual guns and 15x1-4cm/1.5”guns.

The Dutch newspaper Het vrije volk dated 10 November 1954 reported the arrival of the Oostzee captain M.A. Engels and Shropshire in Singapore after a voyage of 31 days from Sydney, Australia. The latter ship did not have a rudder anymore. The Dutch captain expected to arrival within 90 days at England although he feared the winter gales in the Bay of Biscay and on the Atlantic Ocean. The intention was to use the Suez Canal. The average speed underway had been a very satisfying 6 miles. After a voyage of more as 3 months arrived she finally at England. The edition dated 21 January 1955 reported that a day earlier the Oostzee of L. Smit&Co.‘s Internationale Sleepdienst steamed up the Clyde with her tow.

Dutch steam warships Zr.Ms. Djambi and Medusa in Japanese harbours according to the Dutch newspaper Rotterdamsche courant dated 12 January 1864

Model of the Djambi Rijksmuseum Amsterdam, Netherlands

Collection Rijksmuseum Amsterdam, Netherlands. Made by Maarten Bos, 1863.
Medusa under fire by Japanese guns on 11 July 1863 in the Straits of Shimonoseki [Kanmon Straits]


An item reported that according to a tiding dated Nagasaki, Japan 31st October the Dutch screw steamship Zr.Ms. Djambi (1)arrived over there. Everything was well on board. Another Dutch screw steamship Zr.Ms. Medusa (2) was at the same time lying at Yokohama, Japan.

Notes
1. Laid down at the navy yard at Amsterdam, Netherlands on 29 December 1858, launched on 31 October 1860, commissioned on 1 June 1861 (?) and finally sold at sold at Cape Town/Simonstad, South Africa for 1.765 pond in 1874. The intention was to remove her engine and to convert her into a sailing vessel. With a displacement of 2.030 tons (A.J. Vermeulen) or a tonnage of 1.083 tons (Parliament papers) were her dimensions 58.00-62,84 x 12,25 x 5,50 metres. Wood-built. The coal bunker capacity of 340 tons allowed a range of 11 days. The horsepower was 250 hp allowing a speed of 8,5 knots. With a crew numbering 212-250 men consisted the armament of 8 long 30 pd guns and 8 rifled 16cm guns. The navy budget discussions for 1867 called her a large flush deck screw steam corvette. The ships of her type were suitable in times of war to secure an open connection between the Netherlands and her colonies, to act as commerce raiders and in the colonies successful act against troop transports and joined by our ironclads to prevent enemy landings. The design was described as a quite heavy armament, sufficient horsepower and good sailing qualities.
2. Screw steam corvette, laid down at the navy yard of Amsterdam, Netherlands by A.E. Tromp on 25 November 1852, launched on 22 June 1854, departed from the shipyard on 23 November 1854, decommissioned 1 May 1865, converted with small costs into an accommodation ship to serve at the naval establishment at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies ,displacement 1.241 tons and as dimensions 51,50 x 11,14 x 5,00 metres, horsepower of 150 hp, an armament of 19 guns and a crew numbering 240 men.

Dutch screw steamship 4th class Bonaire left London, England according to the Dutch newspaper De standaard dated 9 October 1883

Some years ago lying in a dry dock at Den Helder, Netherlands

An item reported that on the 6th the Dutch screw steamship 4th class Bonaire had left London, England.(1)

Note
1. Laid down at the shipyard of the Nederlandse Stoomboot Maatschappij Fijenoord, Netherlands with yard number 98 on 27 September 1876, launched in the afternoon 0f 12 May 1877, trial on the Haringvliet on Wednesday 26th September, commissioned on 1 May 1880, converted into accommodation ship for the torpedo service at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands 1902, fitted out at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis to be used for the engineers school at Dordrecht, Netherlands, brought back to Hellevoetsluis August 1923, stricken, handed over to the boarding school of the marine academy at Delfzijl, Netherlands and renamed Abel Tasman, out of service in 1988, brought to Den Helder, Netherlands 1996 and since then being restored to retain her original appearance, dimensions 45,00-53,60 x 9,00 x 3,60 metres and a displacement of  850 ton, iron-built and wood-planked and zinc plated, horsepower 90 nhp/410 ehp allowing a speed of 9,2 miles, her crew numbered 84 men and her main armament consisted of 1-15cm gun and 3-12cm guns to which 2-3,7cm revolver guns and 1-12cm mortar were added.

Dutch screw steamship 4th class Bonaire fitted out to replace the Zr.Ms. Marnix at Alexandria, Egypt according to the Dutch newspaper De standaard dated 22 June 1882

The Bonaire lying in a dry dock at Den Helder, Netherlands some years ago

The Marnix as accommodation ship

An item reported that the Dutch screw steamship 4th class Bonaire (1) lying at Willemsoord with all haste was fitted out to replace the screw steamship 4th class Marnix (2) at Alexandria, Egypt.()

Notes
1. Laid down at the shipyard of the Nederlandse Stoomboot Maatschappij Fijenoord, Netherlands with yard number 98 on 27 September 1876, launched in the afternoon 0f 12 May 1877, trial on the Haringvliet on Wednesday 26th September, commissioned on 1 May 1880, converted into accommodation ship for the torpedo service at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands 1902, fitted out at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis to be used for the engineers school at Dordrecht, Netherlands, brought back to Hellevoetsluis August 1923, stricken, handed over to the boarding school of the marine academy at Delfzijl, Netherlands and renamed Abel Tasman, out of service in 1988, brought to Den Helder, Netherlands 1996 and since then being restored to retain her original appearance, dimensions 45,00-53,60 x 9,00 x 3,60 metres and a displacement of  850 ton, iron-built and wood-planked and zinc plated, horsepower 90 nhp/410 ehp allowing a speed of 9,2 miles, her crew numbered 84 men and her main armament consisted of 1-15cm gun and 3-12cm guns to which 2-3,7cm revolver guns and 1-12cm mortar were added.
2. Screw steamships 2nd class, laid down at the navy yard of Amsterdam on 1 May 1865, launched on 6 June 1867,commissioned 1 July 1868?, decommissioned on 16 February 1886, engines and boilers removed and fitted out as accommodation ship for torpedomen at Willemsoord, Netherlands and commissioned on 26 March 1888, decommissioned on 16 November 1908, sold at Willemsoord for ƒ 19.003 to Oudkerk and Van Praag, Den Helder, Netherlands to be broken up on 24 June 1910. With a displacement of 1.488 tons were her dimensions 60,60 x 9,70 x 4,90 metres. With a horsepower of 280 nhp/770 ehp was her speed 10 miles. Her crew numbered 130 men. The armament consisted of 2-15cm guns and 4-12cm guns. Building costs ƒ 677.007,55. Served also in the Dutch East Indies.

Saturday, 18 October 2014

British light cruiser HMS (ex-Bellerophon 1941-1945) Tiger (C-20) 1945-1986

Visiting Rotterdam, Netherlands
Winfried Walta/Anefo, 1963. Beeldbank Nationaal Archief. CC By-Sa. Original link

Of the Tiger-class. Laid down at the John Brown Shipyard. Clydebank as the Minotaru-class light cruiser Bellerophon on 1 October 1941, launched by Lady Stansgate on 25 October 1945, building stopped and laid up in 1946, redesigned as part of the Tiger-class which was approved in 1951, building restarted in 1954, commissioned on 18 March 1959, rebuilt as a helicopter and command criuser at Devonport between 1968 and 1972, decommissioned on 20 April 1978 and broken up staring in October 1986.

With a displacement of 11.560 (original)-12.080 (when rebuilt) were her dimensions 164 (between perpendiculars)-169,3 (over all0 x 20 x 6,4 metres or 538’-555’5” x 64’ x 21’. The Parsons steam turbines and 4 Admiralty 3-drum boilers delivered 80.000 shp allowing a speed of 31,5 knots and with a speed of 16 knots a range of 8.000 nautical miles. Her crew numbered 716 (original)-885 (after conversion) persons. The original armament consisted of 2x2-15,2cm/6” guns and 3x2-7,6cm/3” guns. After her rebuilding she was armed with 1x2-6” guns, 1x2-3” guns, 2-Seacat qua missile launchers and she could carry 4 helicopters with her.

The HMS Tiger commanded by H.L.Lloyd was the flagship of a British squadron (which included also the submarines HMS Oracle and Totem) commanded by vice admiral F.R. Twiss which was practising with a Dutch squadron (including the aircraft carrier Hr,Ms. Karel Doorman), both squadron now were lying in Mid September alongside the Parkkade, Rotterdam. According to the Dutch newspapers dated was the building of the HMS Tiger very expensive with more as 131 million Dutch building costs. The reporter found it surprisingly that steel and aluminium were replaced on a huge scale by plastics. Vice admiral Twiss was not unfamiliar to the Dutch, he had been on board of the British cruiser HMS Exeter which part of the damned ABDA-squadron commanded by the Dutch rear admiral Karel Doorman which was destroyed in February-march 1942 by the Japanese. The warships also attend the Naval Annual Days between 20 and 22 September.

American light/guided missile cruiser USS Little Rock (CL-92/CLG-4/CG-4) 1943-

When visiting Amsterdam, Netherlands in 1965
Ron Kroon/Anefo 1965. Beeldbank Nationaal Archief. CC Attribution-ShareAlike.. Original link

Laid down as a Cleveland-class light cruiser at the shipyard of Cramp Shipbuilding Company, Philadelphia, USA on 6 March 1943, launched whiles sponsored by Mrs. Sam Wassell on 27 August 1944, commissioned on 17 June 1945, reclassified CLG-4 on 23 May 1957, converted into a Galveston-class guided missile cruiser 1957-1960, classified as G-4 on 1 July 1975, decommissioned and stricken on 22 November 1976 and then as a museum ship given to the Buffalo and Erie County Naval&Military Park, Buffalo, New York, USA.

With a displacement of 10.670 (standard)-15.205 (full load) tons were her dimensions 185,95 x 20,22 x 7,6 metres or 610’1’ x 66’4” x 25’. The four steam turbines and 4 Babcock&Wilcox boilers supplied 100.000 shp allowing a speed of 33 knots. Her crew numbered 1.395 men and her armament consisted of 1x3-15,2cm/6” guns, 2x1-“12,7cm/5”guns and 1xtwin rail Mark 7 Talos SAM launcher for which she could carry 46 missiles with her.

American cruiser USS Newport News (CA-148) 1945-1993

USS Newport News visiting Amsterdam, Netherlands
Bert Verhoeff/ANefo 1971. Beeldbank Nationaal Archief. CC Attribution-ShareAlike. Original

Of the Des Moines class-heavy cruisers. Described during her visit to Amsterdam, Netherlands as the largest cruiser of the world.  Laid down at the shipyard of Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company, Newport News, Virginia, USA on 1 November, launched on 6 March 1948, sponsored by Mrs. Homer L. Ferguson, commissioned on 29 January 1949, decommissioned on 27 June 1975, stricken on 31 July 1968 and finally sold to be broken up to the Southern Scrap material Co. Ltd,m New Orleans, USA on 25 February 1993. Between September and October 1971 she visited harbours in England, Netherlands, Denmark, Finland and Germany.

The newspaper Nederlands dagblad dated 18 September 1971 reported that she would visit Amsterdam between 17 and 20 September berthed alongside the Passenger Terminal Amsterdam. On Saturday 18th and Sunday 19th was it possible to visit her between 13.00-16.00 o’clock.

With a displacement of 20.980 tons were her dimensions 218,69 x 23,32 x 8,2 metres or 717’6” x 27’x 27’1. The General Electric turbines and four boilers supplied 120.000 shp allowing a speed of 31,5 knots. Her crew numbered 31,5 knots. The armament consisted of 3x3-20,3cm/8” guns, 6x2-12,7cm/5” guns and 12-3” guns.

American light cruiser USS Springfield (CL-66/CLG-2/CG-7) 1942-1980

Arrival in the harbour of Amsterdam, Netherlands
Joost Evers/Anefo 1967. Beeldbank Nationaal Archief. CC Attribution-ShareAlike. Original url


Of the Cleveland-class. Laid down at the Fore River shipyard of the Bethlehem Steel Corporation, Springfield, Illinois, USA on 13 February 1943, launched while sponsored by Mrs. Angelina Bertera and Miss Norma McCurley on 9 March 1944, commissioned on 9 September 1944, reclassified as CLG-7 after being rebuilt at Quincy/Boston as a Providence class guided missile light cruiser on 23 May 1957, decommissioned on 15 May 1974, reclassified as CG-7 on 1 July 1975, stricken on 31 July 1980 and finally sold to be broken up on 11 March 1980.

With a displacement of 10.601/10.000 long tons were her dimensions 185,95 x 20,19 x 7,49 metres or 610’1” x 66’3” x 24’7”. The geared turbines supplied 100.000 hp/74.570 kW allowing a speed of 31,6knots. Her crew numbered 1.319 persons and her armament consisted of 4x3-15cm/6” guns, 12-13cn/5” guns and 28-4cm guns.

In the period September-November 1967 she conducted gunnery exercises and was testing guide missiles and afterwards visited England, Netherlands, Portugal, Spain and Majorca. According to the newspaper Amigoe di Curacao dated 31 January 1969 was a non-official visit to Curacao, Netherlands Antilles planned between 3-6 February. Her commanding officer was L.W. Zech jr. Apparently was the same year again sent to Curacao to evacuate American citizens regarded the troubled situation there.

American heavy cruiser USS Boston (CA-69/CAG-1) 1942-

Visiting Naples, Italy in 1963
Photo made by Willem van de Poll, 1963, Beeldbank Nationaal Archief. CC Attribution-ShareAlike

Laid down at the shipyard of the Bethlehem Steel Company, Boston, Massachusetts, USA on 30 June 1941, launched while sponsored by Mrs. Maurice J. Tobin on 26 August 1942, commissioned on 30 June 1943, fitted out with guided missiles reclassified CAG-1 on 4 January 1952, reclassified as a heavy cruiser attack CA-69 in May 1968, decommissioned on 5 May 1970, stricken on 4 January 1974 and finally sold to be broken up on 28 March 1975 which was completed a year later.

With a displacement of 13.600 tons were her dimensions 205,21 x 21,89 x 8,18 metres or 67’3”x 71’10’ x 26’10”. Her crew numbered as a heavy cruiser attack 142 men. Speed 33 knots. Her original armament consisted of 9-20,3cm/8” guns and 12-12,7cm/5” guns. As a heavy cruiser attack consisted her armament of 6-20,3cm/8” guns, 10-12,7cm/5“ guns, 12-7,6cm/3” guns and 2x2 rail Terrier Sam launcher.

American light-air defence cruiser USS Fresno (CL-121) 1946-1977

Visiting Amsterdam, Netherlands
Van der Valk/Anefo, 1948. Beeldbank Nationale Archief no. CC Attribution-ShareAlike.

As part of the Juneau-class was she laid down at the shipyard of the Federal Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company, Kearney, New Jersey, USA on 12 February 1945, launched while sponsored by Mrs. Ruth R. Martin on 5 March 1946, commissioned on 27 November, reclassified CLAA-121 on 18 March 1949, stricken April 1965 and sold to Lipsett Incorporation, New York, USA to be broken up on 17 June 1966. With a displacement of 6.000 tons were her dimensions 165 x 16 x 6 metres or 541’6” x 53’3” x 20’7”. Speed 33 knots. A crew numbering 623 men. Her main armament consisted of 6x2-12,7cm/5.7” guns.

The visit to the port of Amsterdam, Netherlands found place when she was stationed at Plymouth, England between 3 March and 19 June 1948 and found place at the end of March.

The Dutch newspaper De locomotief dated 8 April 1948 reported an intended visit of an American squadron consisting of the aircraft carrier Valley Forge, the cruiser Fresno and an escort of four destroyers to the Norwegian port Bergen between 29 April and 2 May. At the same time this American squadron was cruising on the North Sea was also a British squadron including the battleships HMS Howe and Anson active on the North Sea. The British Admiralty announced however that this was a coincidence and the were none combined exercises planned (Algemeen Dagblad dated 23 April).

Dutch oil/chemical tanker Diadema 1966-1985

New dry dock opened by Prince Bernhard.
Photo Jan Voets/Anefo. 21 June 1966. Beeldbank Nationale Archief no. CC Attribution-ShareAlike.

Built at the shipyard Dok&Werf Wilton Fijenoord, Rotterdam, Netherlands with yard number 786 in 1966. Netherlands Antilles-flagged, owned by the Curacaosche Scheepvaart Maatschappij and completed for Shell tankers Rotterdam. Arrived on 24 January 1985 at Shanghai, China to be broken up. IMO 6608749 and callsign PJKE. Summer deadweight 69.259-70.748 tons, gross tonnage 37.109-38.583 tons, net tonnage 24.817 tons and as dimensions 243,68 x 33,59 x 16,94 x 12,64 metres. The horsepower of 18.900 bhp supplied by a 9 cylinder B&W engine allowed a speed of 16,25 knots. Laid down in 1965?, baptized on 18 February 1966 and handed over on 28 June. She was at that moment the largest tanker ever built by the shipyard. She was the first ship which was docked in the new Wilton Fijenoorddok at Schiedam, Netherlands the largest graven dry dock in the Netherlands.

Dutch patrol vessel dry docked at Tandjong Priok, Dutch East Indies around 1947

Collectie Tropenmuseum no. 10001431. CC By-Sa. 


Dutch screw armoured steam corvette Zr.Ms./Hr.Ms. Sumatra 1888-1907

Collectie Tropenmuseum no. 60008806. CC By-Sa. 
Original caption: armoured corvette lying in the drydock at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies


Laid down at the Koninklijke Fabriek van Stoom- en andere Werktuigen at Amsterdam, Netherlands on 5 March 1888, launched on 26 April 1890, commissioned on 16 March 1891, decommissioned in the Netherlands 10 May 1902, laud up in 1905, stricken in 1906 and on 27 March 1907 sold to be broken up. Part of the Indische Military Marine and served in the Dutch East Indies.

Building costs included preparing for the first time for sea ƒ 1.066.000,00. Steel-built. With a displacement of 1.720 tons were her dimensions 70,00 x 11,30 x 4,35 metres. Her armour consisted of a 3,8cm thick deck and her turret was protected by 15cm. The two steam engines and 4 boilers and two screws made a speed of 12,84 miles possible. Coal bunker capacity 280 tons. The armament consisted of 1-21cm gun, 1-15cm gun, 2-12cm guns, 4-3,7cm guns, 2-3,7cm revolvers, 1-7,5cm mortar and 2 torpedo guns. Her crew numbered 167 men.

The Dutch newspaper Algemeen Handelsblad dated 27 April 1890 described the launching. Built for account of the the Department of Colonies was she originally designed by the shipyard which built her. During the negotiations for ordering her were some details changed although shape, construction and dimensions were not altered. Her designers’ intention was to keep the decrease the weight of the hull without limiting the strength of the construction. For this manner were all plates of the outer hull connected with double strips. Toe be certain that her actual draught was more as the designed one was everything added to the ship weighed. The now ended in a sharp shaped cast steel made ram while the stern also was made of steel. The steel made turtle back shaped was 23cm thick protecting the engines, boilers, gunpowder and ammunition rooms, the steering device and the electric lightning. A belt protected her sides even below the water level. It consisted of a so-called cells belt consisting of well closed watertight boxes filled with cellulose which while pressed was able to close holes in the hull while pierced by projectiles. In this manner was prevented that large quantities of water could enter the ship. Further more was she fitted out with a double bottom below the boiler room. Watertight bulwarks were placed as protection against incoming water. Both engines were separated from each other by such a bulwark to keep at all times at least one engine working when another was disabled by water or enemy fire. To prevent damage by the well feared white ant was instead of timber thin steel used for the . When this was not possible was chosen for teak. Despite the financial problems of the shipyard was she according to the newspaper one of the finest smaller warships of her time.

Dutch screw steamship 1st class Zr.Ms./Hr.Ms. Atjeh 1875-1935

Atjeh lying in the dry dock at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies, wrongly dated 1870
Collection Tropenmuseum no. 60005117, CC by-sa. original url

Collectie Rijksmuseum Amsterdam

Laid down at the navy yard at Amsterdam, Netherlands on 3 March 1875, launched on 6 December 1876, commissioned on 1 November 1877, converted into a an accommodation ship at the shipyard De Lastdrager at Den Helder, Netherlands in 1906. Commissioned while replacing the Het Loo in 1908, also used as floating battery for salutes by replacing the 12cm by 7,5cm guns since 1910, further more used for training sailors of the Royal Naval Reserve at Willemsoord, Netherlands until 21 May 1921, decommissioned and since then used as accommodation ship for the air service at Willemsoord, disarmed until 1922, disarmed and stricken in 1929 and finally sold to the N.V. Frank Rijsdijk‘s industrieële undermining at Hendrik ido Ambacht, Netherlands for ƒ 23.501,00 to be broken up o in May 1935. .

With a displacement of 3.160 ton were her dimensions 80,00-91,85 (over all) x 12,50 x 6,10 metres. The horizontal direct working single expansion steam engine of the Koninklijke Fabriek van Werktuigen at Amsterdam, Netherlands and 4 boilers supplied a horsepower of 2.750 hp was her speed 14,25 miles. She was iron-and wood planked. The original armament consisted of 6-17cm guns and 4-12cm guns. In 1864 were 4-12cm guns and 4-3,7cm revolver guns added. Frigate rigged. When purely sailing could her telescopic funnel be lowered and the large double bladed screw be lifted.

Friday, 17 October 2014

American store ship USS Alstede (AF-48)

Of the Alstede-class purchased by the US Navy to transport stores, frozen victuals and equipment. Building ordered by a Maritime Commission contract was she laid down at the shipyard of the Moore Dry Dock Company, Oakland, California with the MC hull 1206 on 30 September 1944, launched by Mrs. Anton Wille on 28 November, handed over to the War Shipping Administration on 4 May 1945 for which she was next operated by the United Fruit Company until purchased by the US Navy on 10 May 1946, renamed as the store ship Alstede (AF-48), commissioned on 17 May 1946, decommissioned and stricken on 31 October 1869 and finally sold to be broken up on 2 June 1970. With a displacement of 1.500 tons were her dimensions 139,95 x 19 x 8,5 metres or 459’2”x 63’x 28’. Speed 16 knots. Her crew numbered 292 men. 

She visited in October 1960 Rotterdam, Netherlands. On3 October she arrived there as part of the American squadron which participated in the NATO -exercise Fallex, The American ships commanded by commander Charles Sanders consisted of the Alstede escorted by the destroyers Wallace L. Lind, Strong and John. H. Willis. The latter destroyer arrived later in the week. 

There are several photo’s made of this visit although the caption claims that the photo was taken in 1962. The captoin by this photo reports Koch, Eric/Anefo, 1962. CC Attribution-ShareAlike with as url http://afbeeldingen.gahetna.nl/naa/thumb/800x600/4203d055-0c68-13a3-d166-363c79505540.jpg

Dutch East Indiaman Vrouwe Maria Jakoba bound for the Dutch East Indies in 1767

She left on 18 July 1767 Texel, Netherlands with as captain Klaas Ariensz, visited Cape of Good Hope, South Africa between 16 December 1767-8 February 1768 and arrived at Batavia, Dutch East Indies on 31 May. On board were at the departure 259 persons on board. Measurement 880 metric tons. Built in 1765 at Hoorn, Netherlands and sailed for account of the Chamber Hoorn.

Dutch East Indiaman Kattendijke bound for the Dutch East Indies in 1767

She left on 17 July 1767 Rammekens, Netherlands with as captain Abel Barber, visited Cape of Good Hope, South Africa between 30 November-19 December and arrived at Batavia, Dutch East Indies on 4 March 1768. Her crew numbered 121 (arrival)-159 (departure) sailors and further more 60 (arrival)-70 (departure) soldiers. Measurement 880 metric tons. Sailed for account of the Chamber Zeeland. On stocks by Willem Udemans at Middelburg, Netherlands on 5 May 1751, launched on 15 February 1752 and as dimensions 140’ x ? x ? Also called Cattendyke.

Dutch East Indiaman Overnes bound for the Dutch East Indies in 1767

She left on 16 May 1767, Texel Netherlands with as captain Willem van Braam, visited Cape of Good Hope, South Africa between 24 Augusts-8 September and arrived at Batavia, Dutch East Indies on 24 November 1767. At the departure were 299 persons on board. Built in 1754 at Amsterdam, Netherlands and sailed for account of the Chamber Amsterdam. Measurement 1.150 metric tons or 400 last. Dimensions 150’ x 41’ x18’.

Dutch East Indiaman Walenburg bound for the Dutch East Indies in 1767

She left on 16 May 1767, Goeree Netherlands with as captain Erasmus de Vries, visited Cape of Good Hope, South Africa between 2-22 October and arrived at Batavia, Dutch East Indies on 26 December. Her crew numbered 111 (arrival)-197 (departure) sailors and further more 46 (arrival)-0 (departure) soldiers. Measurement 880 metric tons. Built in 1764 at Rotterdam, Netherlands and sailed for account of the Chamber Rotterdam.

Dutch East Indiaman Bleiswijk bound for the Dutch East Indies in 1767

She left on 10 June 1767 Goeree, Netherlands with as captain Kornelis van Brattem, visited Cape of Good Hope, South Africa between 7 September-21 October and arrived at Batavia, Dutch East Indies on .26 December. Her crew numbered 146 (arrival sailors and further more 54 (arrival) soldiers. Measurement 880 metric tons. Built in 1756 at Delft and sailed for account of the Chamber Delft.

Dutch East Indiaman Leimuiden bound for the Dutch East Indies in 1767

She left on 10 June 1767 Texel, Netherlands with as captain Thomas Brunel, visited Cape of Good Hope, South Africa between 4 October-19 November and arrived at Batavia, Dutch East Indies on 7 March 1768. Her crew numbered 121 (arrival)-177 (departure) sailors and further more 56 (arrival)-120 (departure) soldiers. Measurement 1.150 tons. Built in 1755 at Amsterdam, Netherlands and sailed for account of the Chamber Amsterdam.

Dutch East Indiaman Nijenborg bound for the Dutch East Indies in 1767

She left on 10 June 1767 Texel, Netherlands with as captain J. Arkerklauw, visited Cape of Good Hope, South Africa between 8-24 October and arrived at Batavia, Dutch East Indies on 5 January 1768. On board were at the departure 184 persons. Measurement 880 metric tons. Built at Hoorn, Netherlands in 1757 and sailed for account of the Chamber Amsterdam.

Dutch East Indiaman Huis te Boede bound for the Dutch East Indies in 1767

She left on 17 July 1767 Rammekens, Netherlands with as captain Johan Nikolaas Herault, visited Cape of Good Hope, South Africa between 7 December 1767-5 January 1768 and arrived at Batavia, Dutch East Indies on 7 May 1768. On board were 198 persons at the departure. Measurement 880 metric tons. Sailed for account of the Chamber Zeeland. On stocks by Willem Udemans at Middelburg, Netherlands on 3 March 1753, launched on 22 February 1754 and as dimensions 140’ x ? x ?

Dutch East Indiaman Lapienenburg bound for the Dutch East Indies in 1767

She left on 16 May 1767 Texel, Netherlands with as captain Hendrik Jakob Beeld, visited Cape of Good Hope, South Africa between 8-27 September and arrived at Batavia, Dutch East Indies on 26 November. At the departure were 309 persons on board. Laid up in the Dutch East Indies on 16 October 1771. Built in 1753 at Amsterdam, Netherlands and sailed for account of the Chamber Amsterdam. Measurement 1.150 metric tons or 400 last. Dimensions 150’ x 42’ x 18‘.

Wednesday, 15 October 2014

Dutch frigate Zr.Ms. Rotterdam harassed by cholera in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated 10 December 1841

An item reported the death after a sickbed of just nine hours on 23rd May of captain lieutenant C.D. Fehrman 1st officer of the Dutch frigate Zr.Ms. Rotterdam stationed in the waters of Riouw, Dutch East Indies.(1) His death was caused by a cholera epidemic on board of the frigate killing between 11 and 19 May Fehrman and another 13 men. The authorities of Riouw immediately placed a locality on the island Bassing for to be used as a hospital for the sick crew. According to the last received tidings were still 68 men nursed. The Dutch schooner Zr.Ms. Pylades was sent to Singapore to buy there the necessary medicines which were not available at Riouw.(2)

Notes
1. Frigate 2nd class, on stocks at the navy yard at Rotterdam, Netherlands December 1821 by P. Glavimans Jz, launched 8 June 1826, razeed as a 38 guns frigate 1838, stricken 1862, dimensions 46,21 (loadline) x 11,91 (inner hull) x 5,17 (fore)-5,74 (aft) x 6,41 (depth below maindeck) metres, a displacement of 1.422 Dutch tons and an armament of 38-44-52 (30 short 30pd, 20-30 pd, 2-8pd) guns.
2. Survey vessel, brigantine. bought in Dutch East Indies, mentioned 1846-1848, dimensions 45,00 x 8,55 x 2,70 metres and an armament of 4 guns.

Dutch corvette Zr.Ms. Juno forced to return to Den Helder, Netherlands due to contray winds according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated 11 December 1841

An item reported that the Dutch corvette Zr.Ms. Juno captain lieutenant A. Klein which left on the 3rd Den Helder, Netherlands towards Surinam was forced to return the next day due to contrary winds.(1)

Note
1. Corvette 1st class , on stocks at the navy yard at Rotterdam, Netherlands by P. Glavimans 20 June 1833, launched 14 May 1839, docked at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands 29 March-17 April 1841, part of the Indies Military Navy since1 January 1868, guard ship at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies 18 September 1867-25 January 1870, sold at Surubaya on a public auction to the native Aridin for ƒ 16.700,00 on 2 July, dimensions 39,50 x 10,70 x 5,3 metres, 932 tons displacement, 22 (1869: 14 medium 30pd guns)-32 guns and a crew numbering 120 (1869) men.

Dutch warships Zr.Ms. Castor respectively Zwaluw, Windhond and Arend bound for respectively the Dutch West and East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated 28 December 1841

An item reported that the Dutch brig Zr.Ms. Zwaluw (1)captain lieutenant W. Enslie was to departed on the 20th, the brigs Arend (2) lieutenant 1st class ‘t Hooft and Windhond (3) lieutenant 1st class Frucht on the 25th all bound for the Dutch East Indies and the corvette Zr.Ms. Castor(4) captain lieutenant F.A. Söhngen on 8 January 1842 towards the Dutch West Indies.

Notes
1. Laid down at the navy yard at Amsterdam, Netherlands 1837, launched on 1 August 1840, served also in the Dutch East Indies, last mentioned 1864, dimensions 32 x9,6 x 4,4 metres and an armament of 18 guns.
2. On stocks at the navy yard at Rotterdam, Netherlands by P. Glavimans 1833, launched 14 January 1839, accommodation ship 1855, stricken 1861, dimensions 26,5 (loadline) x 8,2 (inner hull) x ,2 (fore)-42 (aft) x 426 (hold below maindeck), a displacement of 352 tons and an armament of 14 guns (18-30 pd carronades and 2-6pd guns).
3. Brigantine laid down at the navy yard of Vlissingen, Netherlands by C. Soetermeer 7 June 1826, launched in 1828, docked at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands 26-27 July 1832 and 10 October-2 December 1840, during docking in 1840 rerigged as schooner brig and armament changed in 1-30pd gun on pivot and 4 long 6pd guns, guard ship at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies 1849, decommissioned 1 July 1850, sold being useless, served also in the Dutch East Indies, dimensions 26,5 x 7,5 x 3,8 (hold) metres and an armament of 8-12 guns.
4. On stocks at the navy yard at Rotterdam, Netherlands by P. Glavimans 1833, launched 14 January 1839, accommodation ship 1855, stricken 1861, dimensions 26,5 (loadline) x 8,2 (inner hull) x ,2 (fore)-42 (aft) x 426 (hold below maindeck), a displacement of 352 tons and an armament of 14 guns (18-30 pd carronades and 2-6pd guns).

Etat major of the Dutch corvette Zr.Ms. Castor bound for he Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated 22 December 1841

An item reported that on the 21st on board of the Dutch corvette Zr.Ms. Castor captain lieutenant Shongen lying at the Nieuwediep, Netherlands and bound for the Dutch East Indies were placed lieutenant 1st class G.H. Buschmen, lieutenant 2nd class J.J. Wichers and midshipmen 1st class J.C. van de Kruysse Pilaar.(1)

Note
1 On stocks at the navy yard at Rotterdam, Netherlands by P. Glavimans 1833, launched 14 January 1839, accommodation ship 1855, stricken 1861, dimensions 26,5 (loadline) x 8,2 (inner hull) x ,2 (fore)-42 (aft) x 426 (hold below maindeck), a displacement of 352 tons and an armament of 14 guns (18-30 pd carronades and 2-6pd guns).

Dutch corvette Zr.Ms. Juno departed towards Surinam according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated 25 December 1841

An item reported that on the 19th the Dutch corvette Zr.Ms. Juno captain lieutenant Klein left Texel, Netherlands towards Surinam to transport director general for the navy J.C. Rijk.(1)

Note
1. Corvette 1st class , on stocks at the navy yard at Rotterdam, Netherlands by P. Glavimans 20 June 1833, launched 14 May 1839, docked at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands 29 March-17 April 1841, part of the Indies Military Navy since1 January 1868, guard ship at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies 18 September 1867-25 January 1870, sold at Surubaya on a public auction to the native Aridin for ƒ 16.700,00 on 2 July, dimensions 39,50 x 10,70 x 5,3 metres, 932 tons displacement, 22 (1869: 14 medium 30pd guns)-32 guns and a crew numbering 120 (1869) men.

Dutch corvette Zr.Ms. Juno departed towards the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated 7 December 1841

An item dated Den Helder, Netherlands the 3rd reported the departure the same morning of the Dutch corvette Zr.Ms. Juno (1) captain lieutenant A. Klein with aid of the Dutch steamship Zr.Ms. Etna (2) lieutenant 1st class Baart. The Juno was ordered to transport rear admiral J.C. Rijk governor general of the Dutch West Indies and recently appointed ad director general of the navy to the Dutch West Indies.

Notes
1. Corvette 1st class , on stocks at the navy yard at Rotterdam, Netherlands by P. Glavimans 20 June 1833, launched 14 May 1839, docked at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands 29 March-17 April 1841, part of the Indies Military Navy since1 January 1868, guard ship at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies 18 September 1867-25 January 1870, sold at Surubaya on a public auction to the native Aridin for ƒ 16.700,00 on 2 July, dimensions 39,50 x 10,70 x 5,3 metres, 932 tons displacement, 22 (1869: 14 medium 30pd guns)-32 guns and a crew numbering 120 (1869) men.
2. Paddle steamship 3rd class, on stocks at the navy yard at Vlissingen, Netherlands by C. Soetermeer on 18 September 1837, contract with the (Nederlandsche Stoomboot Maatschappij (NSM) at Fijenoord for engines, boilers and spare parts for ƒ 152.541,48 according to decision 25 May 1838 no. 1, launched 30 April 1839, commissioned 1 November 1839, departed towards the Dutch West Indies 1 October 1842, returned at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands 16 July 1844, docked at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis 20 June17 July 1845, departed towards Rotterdam, Netherlands for maintenance engines, docked at Hellevoetsluis 3 December 1846-6 February 1847,fitted out with a raised keel 1846, departed towards the Dutch East Indies 7 March 1847, decommissioned and condemned in the Dutch East Indies being in an extremely worse condition and just serving around Java 31 December 1863, reported her sale for ƒ 24.500 to W. Cores de Vries on Saturday morning 2 April 1864, dimensions 47,00 (between perpendiculars) x 9,00 (inner hull)x 3,45 (armed) x 5,04 (hold below main deck) metres, an armament of 4 guns (peace time 2 long and 2 short 30pd guns, in wartime 2-30pd bomb guns and 2-short 30pd guns), 178 hp horsepower and a crew numbering 100 men.

Dutch brig Zr.Ms. Arend bound for the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated 23 November 1841

An item reported that the etat major of the Dutch brig Zr.Ms. Arend bound for the Dutch East Indies consisted of lieutenant 1st class ‘t Hooft commanding officer, lieutenant Pieterse 1st officer, lieutenants Van der Capelle and Gobius and finally clerk annex quartermaster Bourjé. (1)

Note
1. On stocks at the navy yard at Rotterdam, Netherlands by P. Glavimans 1833, launched 14 January 1839, accommodation ship 1855, stricken 1861, dimensions 26,5 (loadline) x 8,2 (inner hull) x ,2 (fore)-42 (aft) x 426 (hold below maindeck), a displacement of 352 tons and an armament of 14 guns (18-30 pd carronades and 2-6pd guns).

Dutch paddle steamship Zr.Ms. Hekla bound for the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated 6 November 1841

An item dated Middelburg, Netherlands the 5th reported the departure from Den Helder, Netherlands on the 1st of the Dutch steamship Zr.Ms. Hekla lieutenant 1st class Coertzen towards the Dutch East Indies.(1)

Note
1. Paddle steamship 3rd class first called steam warship, on stocks at the navy yard at Rotterdam, Netherlands 8 September 1838, launched 16 or 18 April 1840, commissioned 1 October 1840, condemned in the Dutch East Indies in 1854, dimensions 43,00 (between perpendiculars) x 8,40 x 4,10 metres 7 guns, coal bunker capacity 11 days, daily coal consumption 11.500 Dutch ponds and a horsepower of 140 hp.

Dutch warships Zr.Ms. Castor, Windhond and Arend bound for respectively the Dutch West and East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated 6 November 1841

An item dated Middelburg, Netherlands the 5th reported that a proposal was sent to the crown to commission on 10th December the Dutch corvette Zr.Ms. Castor (1), the schooner Zr.Ms. Windhond and the brig Zr.Ms. Arend. The Castor captain Song[h] en was bound for the Dutch West Indies, the Windhond (2) lieutenant 1st class Vrucht and the Arend lieutenant 1st class ‘t Hooft both for the Dutch East Indies.

Notes
1. Songen or Songhen was until then 1st officer on board of the frigate Zr.Ms. Sambre. ’Kuil’corvette, on stocks at the navy yard at Amsterdam, Netherlands 1830 by P. Schuijt jr., launched 1835, training battery 1849, stricken as an training battery at Willemsoord, Netherlands 1866, public tenders on 30 May 11.00 o’clock at Willemsoord asked for breaking her up, dimensions 36,50 (between perpendiculars) x 10,0 (inner hull) x 4,25 (fore)-4,82 (aft) x 5,39 (depth below main deck), 775 tons displacement and an armament of 28 guns (20-12pd guns or 20-30pd carronades, 8-12pd carronades and 2-6pd guns.
2. Brigantine, laid down at the navy yard of Vlissingen, Netherlands by C. Soetermeer 7 June 1826, launched in 1828, docked at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands 26-27 July 1832 and 10 October-2 December 1840, during docking in 1840 rerigged as schooner brig and armament changed in 1-30pd gun on pivot and 4 long 6pd guns, guard ship at Surabaya, Dutch east Indies 1849, decommissioned 1 July 1850, sold being useless, served also in the Dutch East Indies, dimensions 26,5 x 7,5 x 3,8 (hold) metres and an armament of 8-12 guns.
3. On stocks at the navy yard at Rotterdam, Netherlands by P. Glavimans 1833, launched 14 January 1839, accommodation ship 1855, stricken 1861, dimensions 26,5 (loadline) x 8,2 (inner hull) x ,2 (fore)-42 (aft) x 426 (hold below maindeck), a displacement of 352 tons and an armament of 14 guns (18-30 pd carronades and 2-6pd guns).

Dutch corvette Zr.Ms. Amphitrite returned from the Dutch West Indies and decommissioned according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated 30 October 1841

An item dated The Hague, Netherlands the 26th reported that the Dutch corvette Zr.Ms. Amphitrite recently returned from the Dutch West Indies was decommissioned on the 20th at Willemsoord, Netherlands.(1)

Note
1. Flush-decked corvette, on stocks at the navy yard at Vlissingen, Netherlands by C. Soetermeer 1827, launched 22 June 1830, commissioned 16 August 1830, reduced to 20-gun ‘kuil’-corvette 1837, decommissioned November-December 1851 at Curacao due to worse condition and not able to return homewards, sold to be broken up at Curacao 13 April 1852, with as dimensions 39 (between perpendiculars) x 10,5 (inner hull) x 4,10 (fore)-4,70 (aft) x 5,37 (hold below deck) metres and a displacement of <850 tons, an armament consisted of 18 short 30pd guns and 2-12pd guns after 1837 and a crew numbering 300 men (1830).

Dutch corvette Zr.Ms. Juno bound for the Dutch West Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Zierikzeesche Courant dated 29 October 1841

An item referred tot tidings that the at the Nieuwediep, Netherlands lying Dutch corvette Zr.Ms. Juno was to depart on short notice towards Surinam to bring rear admiral Rijk.(1)

Note
1. Corvette 1st class , on stocks at the navy yard at Rotterdam, Netherlands by P. Glavimans 20 June 1833, launched 14 May 1839, docked at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands 29 March-17 April 1841, part of the Indies Military Navy since1 January 1868, guard ship at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies 18 September 1867-25 January 1870, sold at Surubaya on a public auction to the native Aridin for ƒ 16.700,00 on 2 July, dimensions 39,50 x 10,70 x 5,3 metres, 932 tons displacement, 22 (1869: 14 medium 30pd guns)-32 guns and a crew numbering 120 (1869) men.

Dutch corvette Zr.Ms. Nehalennia returned from the Dutch East Indies and decommissioned according to the Dutch newspaper Vlissingse Courant dated 20 October 1841

An item dated The Hague, Netherlands the 13th reported that the Dutch corvette Zr.Ms. Nehalennia returned from the Dutch East Indies and lying at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands was decommissioned and her commanding officer captain lieutenant Van der Plaat now non-active.(1)

Note
1. ‘Kuil’corvette, on stocks at the navy yard at Vlissingen, Netherlands, Netherlands 18/28 December 1824 door C. Soetermeer, launched 22 September 1827, guard ship 1847, docked at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands 4-6 July 1838 and 29 November 1841-11 May 1843 when decided was not to repair but prepare her for a voyage to the Dutch East Indies, to serve there for some time and then to be used as guard ship, guard ship 1847, sold on a public auction at Surabaya. Dutch East Indies where she was lying in the basin at the navy establishment on Saturday 22 November 1856, dimensions 36,50m x 10,30m x ?, 776 tons displacement and an armament of 28 guns.

Dutch merchant ship Overijssel wrecked in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Zierikzeesche Courant dated 15 October 1841

An item reported that the Dutch merchant ship Overijssel underway from Amsterdam, Netherlands towards Batavia, Dutch East Indies was wrecked in Strait Bali. All crewmembers and passengers were saved. On board was colonel Lucassen with his improved devices for sugar production.(1)

Note
1. This probably Theodoor Lucassen (2 Augustus 1792, Bremmen, Germany-31 January 1854 The Hague, Netherlands, which ended his military career as a highly decorated colonel, head of the military administration in the Dutch East Indies. His business partner was Hubertus Paulus Hoevenaar (16 March 1814 Amsterdam, Netherlands-18 February 1886).

Monday, 13 October 2014

German container ship Sonderborg Strait 2012-


Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 12 October 2014

Antigua&Barbuda-flagged, homeport St. John’s, IMO 9454242, MMSI 305904999 and callsign V2GD6.

Danish ro-ro cargo ship (ex-Tor Primula 2004-2010) Primula Seaways 2010-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 12 October 2014

Denmarik International register-flagged, IMO 9259513, MMSI 220253000 and callsign OUIM2. Ex-Tor Primula renamed July 2010.

Turkish oil chemical tanker STI Larvotto 2013-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 11 October 2014

Marshall Islands-flagged, homeport Majuro, IMO 9645774, MMSI 538005119 and callsign V7BD3.

Greek crude oil tanker (ex-Aspropyrgos 2004-2009 Stena Callas 2009-?) Aspropyrgos

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 11 October 2014

Bahamas-flagged, homeport Nassau as the Stena Callas, IMO 9283629, MMSI 31170200 and callsign C6TM9. Ex-Aspropyrgos renamed January 2009 Stena Callas.

British crude oil tanker Sharp Lady 2012-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 11 October 2014

United Kingdom-flagged, homeport Douglas, Isle of Man, IMO 9577044, MMSI 235090261 and calsign 2EKQ4.

Greek oil/chemical tanker Rosa Tomasos 2003-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 11 October 2014

Bahamas-flagged, homeport Nassau, IMO 9240718, MMSI 311467000 and callsign C6ST6.

Danish containership Estelle Maersk 2006-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 9 October 2014

Denmark International Regiser-flagged, homeport Hellerup, IMO 9321495, MMSI 220478000 and callsign OVXO2.

Swedish general cargo ship (ex-Sandon 2005-2008) Transhawk 2008-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 8 October 2014

Gibraltar-flagged, IMO 9248552, MMSI 236272000 and callsign ZDGR8. Ex-Sandon renamed May 2008.

Japanese bulk carrier Cape Mathilde 2010-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 7 October 2014

Panama-flagged, IMO 9409120, MMSI 352665000 and callsign HOVQ

Canadian bulk carrier Federal Yoshino 2001-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 3 October 2014

Marshall Islands-flagged, IMO 9218416, MMSI 538004245 and callsign V7VY9

Chinese general cargo vessel Yongxing 1998-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 11 October 2014

Hong Kong/China-flagged, homeport Hong Kong, IMO 9150303, MMSI 477450000 and callsign VRYZ5.

Cypriot oil/chemical tanker STI Brixton 2014-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 2 October 2014

Marshall Islands-flagged, IMO 9686869, MMSI 538005399 and callsign V7DL8.

Polish reefer Colombian Star 1998-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 2 October 2014

Liberia-flagged, homeport Monrovia, IMO 9172480, MMSI 636014240 and callsign A8SL3.

Sunday, 12 October 2014

Russian survey-research vessel (ex-Solea 1982-1993, Stevns Surveyor 1993-2009) Skat 2009-


Nizjni Novgorod 20 April 2014

With thanks to Vladimir Kilyazov for allowing us to publish both photos.

Russia-flagged, IMO 8330748. Gross tonnage 172 tons, net tonnage 51 tons, summer deadweight 73 tons, displacement 257 tons and as dimensions 27,21 (rule length)-29,37 (over all) x 8,0 (moulded) x 1,25 x 2,05 (height) metres. Speed 9,0 knots. Built 1 March 1983 by MWB Motorenwerke, Bremerhaven, Germany with yard number 915. Ex-Solea 1982-May 1993, Stevns Surveyor May 1993-July 2009. Owned by the SMNG-Center, joint stock company, Moscow, Russia.