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Thursday, 31 October 2019

MUSEUM OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY - BELGRADE - SERBIA

Placed with courtesy of Gordana Karovic


Museum of Science and Technology - Belgrade this year marks its 30th anniversary. Since 2005, the seat of the Museum is in the building of the former first Belgrade power station. The Museum is a state cultural institution whose activities in the field of cultural heritage protection covers various fields of history of science and technology, which are grouped into sixteen professional sections. One of this sections is Traffic and transport with the Collection of the history of navigation as the richest one, including important archive and more than 10.000 photographs.

This is the only museum collection in Serbia within which exhibits and material related to navigation history are systematically collected. The collection is mostly formed through donations from large shipping and water companies, shipyards and individuals who donate objects, photographs, documents, books from their personal and family legacies and thus contribute to preserving the tradition and studying the history of Serbian river and sea shipping.

She is not in the same position from the end of November 2015. She is now in the shipyard  

The museum is the owner of one historical ship - steam tugboat Župa made in Budapest in 1913 for DDSG from Vienna and first named Una. Name Župa tugboat carries from 1945 when she was assigned to the Yugoslav River Shipping Fleet. Župa is still waiting for funds to enable its reconstruction and presentation as the museum ship.

In September 2018 Museum of Science and Technology - Belgrade was the host of the Fifth Conference of the European Network of River Museums (ENoRM). For that occasion two exhibitions were opened: „Historic river vessels“ - joint panel exhibition of the participating museums, designed by MST designer Marko Jovanović, and „The Danube in Serbia - A Journey Through Technical Museums“.

Wednesday, 23 October 2019

French inland cargo vessel (ex-Dane 1952-) Titanic



Rouen, France 22 September 2016

Ex-Shell tanker  Danae. Registration number P12129F. ENI 01831786. Built at Villeneuve La Garenne in 1952. Renamed in 2009?

German inland vessel Bayern now Russian property according to a CIA report dated 6 August 1953

An item reported that the Danube river ship Bayern in de Second World War sunk near Hainburg, Germany near the Austro-Hungarian border was salvaged and transported to the Austrian Korneuburg shipyard. In the past was she owned by a German company active on the Danube but now Soviet owned. Length around 80 metres with engines delivering 1.800hp. Despite she was sunk was the machinery in excellent condition.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, document number CIA-RDP80-00810A001900030009-9

Canadian self discharging bulk carrier (ex-H.M. Griffith 1973-2000) Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin 2000-

With courtesy of Willem van Maanen

Canada-flagged, homeport St. Catharines, IMO 7324405, MMSI 316001635 and call sign  VGFJ. Ex-H.M. Griffith renamed May 2000. Owned and ISM-managed by CSL Group, Montreal, Canada with as commercial manager CSL Americas, Middleton, Michigan, USA. Built by Collingwood Shipbuilding, Collingwood, Canada in 1973. 

Austrian Korneuburg shipyards building steam pile drivers for the Soviet Union according to a CIA report dated 21 July 1954

An item reported the passing on 1 September 1953 of the Soviet Danube Shipping Company (SDGP)  motor ship Taman going downriver. On tow was a new steam pile driver built at the Austrian Korneuburg shipyards for the Soviet Union. On 3 September was a similar steam pile driver built by the same shipyards berthed in the harbour of Bratislava, Czechoslovakia  [now Slovakia]. Seven days was she sighted at Komarno, Czechoslovakia [now Slovakia) towed by the Soviet Danube Shipping Company (SDGP) ship Suhomy towards the Soviet Union.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, document number CIA-RDP80-00810A004300560010-2

French inland work boat

Rouen, France 22 September 2016

Dutch lugger Maasvinding (MA) in 1897

Owned by H. Overman, Maassluis, Netherlands, master Jan van Ingen.

Source
Department Foreign Affairs (National Archive, The Hague, Netherlands) A-files inventory number 234. Naamlijst der Nederlandsche Reederijen en Haringschepen, benevens de sloepen, welke de kabeljauwvisscherij in de Noordzee uitoefenen; published by Dorsman&Odé, Vlaardingen, 1897.

Dutch lugger Margaretha Christina (MA 8) in 1897

Owned by H. Overman, Maassluis, Netherlands  master Willem Kaptein.

Source
Department Foreign Affairs (National Archive, The Hague, Netherlands) A-files inventory number 234. Naamlijst der Nederlandsche Reederijen en Haringschepen, benevens de sloepen, welke de kabeljauwvisscherij in de Noordzee uitoefenen; published by Dorsman&Odé, Vlaardingen, 1897.

German container ship (ex-Laura Ann 2002, Ruth Borchard 2002-2004, Holland Maas Caribes 2004-2005) Laura Ann 2005-

Near Rouen, France 21 September 2016

Antigua&Barbuda-flagged, homeport St. John’s, IMO 9242558, MMSI 305600000 and call sign V2AR8. Ex-Laura Ann renamed February 2002, Ruth Borchard renamed January 2004 and Holland Maas Caraibes renamed 16 August 2005. Owned and managed by Eicke Schiffahrt, Heide-Holst, Germany. Built by JJ Siets Schiffswerft, Hamburg, Germany in 2002. 

French privateer Aimable Aimee 1805

Mentioned in 1805.

Source
J. Vichot. Repertoire des navires de guerre français. Paris, 1967. 

French privateer Victorieux 1809

Mentioned in 1809.

Source
J. Vichot. Repertoire des navires de guerre français. Paris, 1967. 

French privateer Victor 1807-1810

Mentioned between 1807-1810.

Source
J. Vichot. Repertoire des navires de guerre français. Paris, 1967. 

French privateer Victoire 1814

Captured by British in 1814.

Source
J. Vichot. Repertoire des navires de guerre français. Paris, 1967. 

Singapore crude oil tanker (ex-Megacore Pacifica 2011) SCF Pacifica 2011-


Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 25 May 2015

Liberia-flagged, homeport Monrovia, Liberia, IMO 9577068, MMSI 636015361 and call sign D5AE7. Ex-Megacore Pacifica renamed September 2011. Built at the Hyundai Mipo Dockyard, Ulsan, South Korea in 2011. Owned and managed by SCF Unicorn Singapore, Singapore.

British transport Serapis damaged in collision according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated 15 December 1873

An item reported that the British transport Serapis collided near Malta with a British steamship which caused a large leak. Thanks to the watertight compartments was she able to keep floating and returning safely to Malta.

Chinese troop transport wrecked according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated 30 September 1887

An item reported that a Chinese transport was lost at the Pescadores or Penghu Islands. Her captain, almost de entire crew and 300 soldiers were drowned. The newspaper Goessche Courant dated 1 October referred to the newspaper Standard which received tidings from Shanghai a Chinese transport was stranded on one of the Pescadores during which the officers and more as 300 soldiers lost their lives.

Japanese transport Vara wrecked according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated 18 January 1898

An item reported that the Japanese transport Vara struck a unknown cliff near the Pescadores and sunk taking with her 85 men. The newspaper Goessche Courant confirmed this item referring to tidings received at Antwerp.

Naval operations of the Dutch East Company in Bandjermasin according to the Generale Missive dated 30 November 1729

The sloep Valk arrived from there with a cargo of 355 pikol pepper. Apparently were problems with Chinese merchants in this territory, especially in the pepper trade.

Source
J. van Goor. Generale Missiven van Gouverneurs-Generaal en Raden aan Heren XVII der Verenigde Oostindische Compagnie. Deel IX: 1727-1737. The Hague, 1988, p. 30-31.

Japanese bulk carrier Nord Vela 2011-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 6 April 2015

Panama-flagged, IMO 9431173, MMSI 352634000 and call sign HOUD. Built at the Sanoyas Muzuhima Works&Shipyard, Kurashiki, Japan. Owned by Nissen Kaiun and managed by Kowa Marine ervices, both of Imabari, Japan.
Movements of the Dutch E.I.C. ships in the Dutch East Indies in April 1694
The National Archive of Indonesia published on her website tables of contents of the so-called Daghregisters (Daily accounts) of the Castle Batavia, HR no.'s 2512-2513. Unfortunately they are in Dutch. In those tables you can find for instance information about the ships arriving at and departing from Batavia (nowadays Djakarta). I extracted the movements of the ships and vessels owned by the E.I.C. The dates mentioned below in the text are the register dates. See also on this weblog the notes dealing with cargo capacities and individual ships.

Beijer, ship, chamber Delft, arrived at Batavia coming from the Netherlands 1 April 1694
Borsenburg, fluyt, arrived at Batavia coming from Bengal 7 April 1694, departed Batavia towards Cheribon for a cargo of wood 15 April 1694
Bije, fregat, departed Batavia towards Malabaar 15 April 1694
Casteel Batavia, chialoup, departed Batavia towards the Schoondijke in the Sunda Strait 27 April 1694
Coninck William, ship, decided that she was destined with the Maas and Crab towards Ceylon 30 April 1694
Crab, ship, arrived at Batavia coming from Ceylon 11 April 1694, destined to be homeward bound but first to bring a cargo of rice towards Ceylon 15 April 1694
Dageraat, small yacht, news of her shipwrecking off Robben eiland 30 April 1694
Dieren, fluyt, arrived at Batavia coming from Bengal 5 April 1694, departed Batavia towards Bantam for a cargo of pepper 22 April 1694
Fortuna, small yacht, arrived at Batavia coming from the Vries baaij 26 April 1694
Goudebuijs, ship, chamber Enkhuizen, news arrived of her disastrous voyage 1 April 1694, news that she was stranded off Cape of Good Hope or near the Baai van Sint Helena 30 April 1694
Groote Visserije, ship, departed Batavia towards Bantam for a cargo of pepper 9 April 1694
Java, ship, arrived at Batavia coming from Ceylon 11 April 1694
Maas, ship, destined to bring a cargo of rice towards Ceylon and to join the fleet commanded by commandeur Paulus Huntum 15 April 1694
Peperthuyn, small yacht, arrived at Batavia coming from Palembang with a cargo of pepper 12 April 1694
Schoondijke, ship, arrived at Batavia coming from the Netherlands 27 April 1694
Snauw, yacht, departed Batavia via Cheribon and Tagal towards Japara and from there via Rembang destined towards Soerabaja 4 April 1694
Stantvastigheijt, yacht, departed Batavia towards Mauritius and Madagascar instead of the returned Eemland 4 April 1694
Vosmaar, ship, arrived at Batavia coming from Ceylon 11 April 1694
Waddinxveen, ship, arrived at Batavia coming from Ceylon 11 April 1694
Wint, small frigate, destined towards Tonquin 19 April 1694
Zeehaas, pantjalang, arrived at Batavia coming from Cheribon 17 April 1694
Zillida, yacht, mentioned as being in the Vries baaij 5 April 1694, mentioned as being in the Vries baaij 10 April 1694, arrived at Batavia coming from the Vries baaij 26 April 1694

Colombian privateers active off Cadiz according to the Nederlandsche Staatscourant dated 7 October 1825

Cadiz, 16 September. According to letters from Malaga were two Colombian privateers cruising between Malaga and Torre Molino harassing the merchant trade shipping. Two of the fastest sailers they recently captured were armed by them and since then these ships captured off Malaga several important prizes.

The Egyptian, Greek and Turkish navies in the Mediterranean according to the Nederlandsche Staatscourant dated 24 November 1825

Vienna, 10 November. Tidings from Constantinople arrived dealing with the departure of the combined Turkish-Egyptian fleet from Alexandria. The Captain Pasha departed 9 October with his fleet and a convoy of transports with on board Egyptian and Albanian troops, war stores and victuals. At the same time the Egyptian fleet partly departed. Some sources stated that the Captain Pasha was to wait at Suda, Candia for the other part of the Egyptian fleet. This part stayed behind at Alexandria to escort a convoy destined towards Morea. The Captain Pasha was underway while off Rhodes informed that the combined Greek fleets commanded by Sachturi and Miaulis were waiting at a small distance from him. Within short time they approached him with the intention the attack. While the captain Pasha wanted to avoid a battle with being joined by the complete Egyptian fleet and fearing for his convoy decided he to stay in the harbour of Marmorissa. A contrary wind prevented the Greeks to arrive before the Turkish fleet at this harbour but was waiting there within a short distance for a better opportunity.

Trieste, 5 November. A vessel which arrived coming from Corfu in 3 days mentioned the arrival of a British frigate coming from Suda at Corfu. The Turkish-Egyptian arrived in the meantime at Suda. In the harbour of Avlona were still some Turkish ships afraid to depart despite the fact that Miaulis left this harbour 2 months before! However there were still some small Greek vessels cruising near the harbour and for their presence were the Turkish afraid.

The British, French and Portuguese navies according to the Nederlandsche Staatscourant dated 6 April 1833

The government steamboat Confiance arrived in England with tidings from Oporto and Lisbon dated until 25 March. The siege by the followers of Dom Miguel of Oporto still increased. The 3 warships belonging to Dom Pedro which were anchored off Oporto were destroyed or damaged without any hope for repairs. Two British merchant ships which tried 21 March to enter the river were attacked by the followers of Dom Miguel, one was shot in the ground, the second one forced on the beach, plundered and burnt. In the evening of the 25th appeared off the Douro the squadron commanded by Sartorius who stayed for a long time before the entrance to the Bay of Vigo, Spain but not with the intention to aid Don Pedro. His crews consisted mainly of British sailors which were now more or less mutiny due to sickness, lacking victuals and stores and worse payment. The most of the officers requested their discharge out of the service from Dom Pedro while Sartorius threatened in a letter dated 10 March that if he didn’t get his money within short time he would return with is ships to England and sell them there to satisfy the crews. Dom Pedro reacted by replacing Sartorius as commanding officer by captain Crosbie. When the latter with another British naval officer sir John Doyle arrived he carried with him an order to arrest Sartorius. Sartorius took instead Crosbie and Doyle prisoner and sailed to the mouth of the Douro to blockade the river until Dom Pedro finally paid.

The newspaper Morning Herald dated 2 April published tidings coming from Portsmouth. Here was a British squadron fitted out destined towards the East. Of the united fleet commanded by Sir Pulteney Malcolm was 1 April at Downs just the British ship of the line Talavera (1) and 2 smaller vessels and 5 French warships left.

Source
J.J. Colledge and Ben Warlow. Ships of the Royal Navy. London, 2006.

Note
1. Launched at the Woolwich dockyard 15 October 1818, ex-Thunderer renamed 23 July 1817, dimensions 174 x 48’5” and a builder’s measurement of 1.718 tons and armed with 74 guns. Accidentally burnt at Plymouth 1840.

Chinese bulk carrier (Star of Rbd 2008-2012) Stellae Mare 2012-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 6 June 2015

Panama-flagged, IMO 9375941, MMSI 370736000 and call sign H9QL. Ex-Star of Rbd renamed October 2012. Built at the Sanoyas Mizushima Works&Shipyard, Kurashiki, Japan in 2008. Owned and managed by MK Shipmanagement, Hong Kong, China. 

British bark Birker underway from England towards Singapore according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 6 June 1887

An item dated 3rd reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer [nowadays Anyer, Indonesia] by the British bark Birker underway from Cardiff, England towards Singapore.

American bark Wildwood underway from Singapore towards USA according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 6 June 1887

An item dated 3rd reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer [nowadays Anyer, Indonesia] by the American bark Wildwood underway from Singapore towards Boston, USA.

The Colombian, Mexican and Spanish navies and the Colombian privateers according to the Nederlandsche Staatscourant dated 8 August 1825

London, 3 August. From Cadiz came tidings there were still constantly 4 Colombian privateers cruising off the port, the smallest armed with 8 guns and they were relived from time to time by others coming from Gibraltar. At Cadiz arrived 7 July a royal commissary ordered to haste the preparations for the expedition towards Havana. According to rumours informed the Spanish governor at Havana his government that a Mexican-Colombian squadron intended to attack Cuba. The Spanish ships which were fitted out Cadiz were first destined towards Coruna to join there the others ships before to leave for Havana.

The French and Turkish navies in the Mediterranean according to the Nederlandsche Staatscourant dated 23 April 1833

The newspaper Beobachter published some tidings coming from Constantinople dated 27 March. The French goelette la Mesangh arrived at Constantinople with tidings from Alexandria dated 9 March reporting that the Egyptian pasha Mehemet Ali the latest peace conditions had rejected.(1) The 22nd arrived a part of the Turkish fleet lying off Gallipoli at Constantinople and anchored off Beschiktasch and Dalmabagtsche. It consisted of 4 ships of the line, 2 frigates, 2 brigs and 1 cutter. The Sultan visited the admirals’ ship Mahmudie. The remaining 10 ships of the fleet were still between Lampsaki and Gallipoli.

Source
J. Vichot. Repertoire des navires de guerre français. Paris, 1967.

Note
1. This must be the goelette la Mésange launched at Toulon 1823, last mentioned 1851.

Italian bark Nemesi was bound for Singapore according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 27 September 1893

An item dated Nieuw Anjer [nowadays Anyer, Indonesia] 26th reported that the Italian bark Nemesi was bound for Singapore.

Russian reefer (ex-Saronic Bay 2001-2013) Frio Vladivostok 2013-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 10 May 2015

Russia-flagged, IMO 9175274, MMSI 273374170 and call sign UBJN2. Ex-Saronoc Bay renamed 2 October 2013. Built by 61 Communards Shipbuilding, Nikolayev, Ukraine in 2001. Owned and managed by Arctic Shipping, St. Petersburg, Russia.

Naval operations of the Dutch East Company at Djambi according to the Generale Missive dated 25 March 1741

The pantjalang Suikermaler arrived 25 February at Batavia coming from Djambi with letters dated 5 and 15 February and 3 letters of the sultan Astra Ingalaga and the pangerans Dipati Mankuningrat and Purbanagara. An native vessel transported 20.000 pieces of rattan.

Source
J. van Goor. Generale Missiven van Gouverneurs-Generaal en Raden aan Heren XVII der Verenigde Oostindische Compagnie. Deel X: 1737-1743. The Hague, 2004, p. 610.

The Egyptian, Greek and Turkish navies in the Mediterranean according to the Nederlandsche Staatscourant dated 26 January 1827

Frankfurt, 21 January. The newspaper Augsburgsche Zeitung dated 19 January published some tidings coming from Ancona dated 4 January. The tidings referred to the arrival of Bavarian officers at Napoli-di-Romana 5 December 1826 with the schooner Pegasus. The schooner had in a storm lost contact with her convoy and met the Turkish-Egyptian fleet, which coming from Candia arrived off Modon. The schooner managed to escape and entered the harbour of Napoli at the same time as the 36/44-gun frigate built at New York and which was presented by this town to the Greeks and called Hellas.(1) Admiral Miaulis was to command her.

Note
1. See on this weblog for instance the note “The Greek frigate Liberator never served in the Greek navy but became instead USS frigate Hudson”.

The British and French navies according to the Nederlandsche Staatscourant dated 12 January 1827

Paris, 7 January. The 13th arrived two Brazilian ships in the harbour of Vigo. While the Spanish government didn’t recognise yet the Brazilian empire they had to replace the Brazilian flag by the Portuguese.

The frigate Surveillante, the brig Endymion and the goelette Surprise left the 4th Brest, commanded by vice-admiral Lemarant, destined towards Brazil to transport marquis de Gabriac French representative at the court of Rio Janeiro.

London, 5 January. The British fleet on the Portuguese river Taag consisted 28 December 1826 of 1-80 gun ship, 6-74 gun ships, 2-42 gun frigates, 1-24 gun frigate, 1-18 gun and 1-12 gun corvette and 10-gun brigs excluded the armed packet boats and brigs used for coming and going traffic. The fleet was commanded by vice admiral lord Beauclerck and rear-admiral sir T.M. Hardy and said to number 12.000 men.

Naval operations of the Dutch East Company at Palembang according to the Generale Missive dated 25 March 1741

The ship Den Dam departed 31 January towards Palembang with 29.000 of the 60.000 Mexicans asked for, lacking more in storage.

Source
J. van Goor. Generale Missiven van Gouverneurs-Generaal en Raden aan Heren XVII der Verenigde Oostindische Compagnie. Deel X: 1737-1743. The Hague, 2004, p. 610.

British bark Woodville cruising in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 5 January 1887

An item dated 4th reported that the British bark Woodville off Nieuw Anjer [nowadays Anyer, Indonesia] was ordered to go towards Surabaya, Dutch East Indies.

American bark Great Surgeon underway from USA towards Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated dated 25 January 1887

An item dated 22nd reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer [nowadays Anyer, Indonesia] by the American bark Great Surgeon underway from New York, USA towards Batavia, Dutch East Indies. She arrived there on the 24th. Captain Flynn, shipping agents Wellenstien Krausse.

Singapore car carrier Asian Parade 1996-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 26 May 2015

South Korea-flagged, IMO 9122954, MMSI 441993000 and call sign D8CV. Built by Hyundai Heavy Industries, Ulsan, South Korea in 1996. Owned by Eukor Shipowning Singapore, Singapore and managed by Wilhelmsen Shipmanagement Korea, Pusan, South Korea.

The Brazilian navy according to the The Mechanic’s Magazine of 27 March 1858

Thanks to the fact that nowadays more and more books are digitized we are able to read books that are some times for decades no longer available for the public for several reasons. That’s quite a pity while these books contains useful information while the archives are destroyed, incomplete or nor accessible.

P. 292: “The advances made of late years by the Brazilian Empire, under the enlightened Government of Don Pedro II., well deserves the attention of the mechanics and men of science in this country. The steady improvement of the Imperial navy, in particular, is worthy of their consideration, and may be observed, not only in the increased number of vessels built for that navy in England and France, but also in the extension of the resources of the Government at Bio Janeiro, Bahia, and other ports. Before referring to a few facts which have come under our own notice, it may not be amiss to allude to those mentioned in an excellent work upon Brazil, recently published by two American missionaries, who have long been resident in that magnificent country. Not far from Praia Grande, they tell us, is the foundry, engine manufactory, and shipyard of Ponta d'Area, where four or five hundred mechanics and labourers, under European and Brazilian supervision, are turning out works of importance and magnitude. In the year 1851, besides boilers, kettles, stills, and other like articles, this establishment constructed four steamers with their engines; and two steamers and a bark, in addition, were laid down upon the stocks. From the same source we learn that in the city of Bahia a Company has just been formed for the provision of a patent slip, a jetty capable of coaling the largest steamers, bonded warehouses, and stores for the deposit of coal. Lieut. Robert Grundy, C.E., has been nominated by the Board of Directors to act as Manager, and the works are to be commenced forthwith and carried on with activity.

From the Jornal de Commercio, published at Rio de Janeiro, on the 3d of January last, we learn that a splendid steam yacht, for the service of the Emperor, has just been completed. This yacht was designed by Mr. Level, the chief constructor of the Government works, and built at the establishment at Ponta d’Area, under the supervision of Sr. Correa de Aguiar. She is fitted with a pair of Penn's oscillating engines, and appears to be in all respects an efficient and elegant vessel.

At the present time there are building in England eight, and in France two, gunboats for the Brazilian service. Of these, four are at Mr. Pitcher's yard, Northfleet; four at Messrs. Green's, Blackwall; and the remaining two at the yard of Mr. Norman, of Havre. Those at Northfleet we have lately inspected, and could not fail to observe that, while the Brazilian Admiral in charge of them has not been slow to avail himself of the good features of the gunboats built by the British Government, he has not, on the other hand, failed to introduce novel improvements of his own or others which have recommended themselves to his adoption. The most noticeable change which we remarked was the apparently enormous space appropriated to the shot, shell, and powder magazines. These in the Ibicuy and Itajahy - the two most forward vessels - certainly seem to indicate that the chief object has by no means been lost sight of; and as these craft are very likely to be on active service for long periods on the vast rivers of Brazil, far from their resources, their designer has, doubtless, displayed proper foresight in this arrangement. Each of these gunboats is of 400 tons burden, builder's measurement, is fitted with 80 h.p. trunk engines by Penn, and carries 2 pivot 68-pounders, and 4 broadside 32-pounders. The rudders are worked by a patent steering apparatus, the invention of Mr. John Graham, of London.

We cannot conclude this short paper without remarking that the time is probably drawing near when the Brazilian Government will be in a position to supply all the demands of its navy from its own dockyards. Timber is plentiful in Brazil, and skilled labour is yearly becoming more easily obtainable. For several years past there have been a few young native officers studying the science and practice of naval architecture in this country, and although our Government steadily refuses their applications for the same facilities of study in our Royal Dockyards as are constantly accorded to the officers of the tyrannical Governments of Europe - Russia, Austria, &c., - yet we are able from our own knowledge to state that some, at least, of these young Brazilian gentlemen have gained a careful and comprehensive knowledge of the art of ship-building, and have fully succeeded in fitting themselves to conduct

p. 293: the business of their own dockyards. Of course English ship-builders will hare ultimately to bear the loss resulting from the withdrawal of Brazilian order?; but we cannot on that account refrain from wishing every success to the enterprises of a Government so just, so intelligent, and so progressive as that which now guides the destinies of the Brazilian Empire.”

Source
The Mechanic’s Magazine, Saturday 27 March 1858.

The Greek and Turkish navies in the Levant according to the Nederlandsche Staatscourant dated 14 September 1825

Corfu, 13 August. After the failed attack by Rumili Pasha succeeded the Greek fleet in burning two large Turkish ships by using a fire ship and capturing a brig. The remaining Turkish ships fled into the harbour of Salona and were captured by a Greek division.

Naval operations of the Dutch East Company at Djambi according to the Generale Missive dated 31 March 1738

The tandjungpura Kakatoe arrived 9 January at Batavia with letters dated 2 December from the resident and the sultan, 50 pikol pepper and 205 tael gold, total value fl. 13.000. The pantjalang Suikermaler returned 8 March with a letter dated 20 February of the resident and the pangeran Natawidjaja Mankunegara, 20 pikol pepper and 62 tael gold.

Source
J. van Goor. Generale Missiven van Gouverneurs-Generaal en Raden aan Heren XVII der Verenigde Oostindische Compagnie. Deel X: 1737-1743. The Hague, 2004, p. 91-92.

Tuesday, 22 October 2019

Canadian self discharging bulk carrier (ex-Trelsi 1991-2001, Euro Swan 2008-2011, Lalandia Swan 2011-2015) Manitoulin 2015-

Above the Soo lock after unloading in Sault St. Marie 29 Apr 2018
With courtesy of Willem van Maanen

Canada-flagged, IMO 8810918, MMSI 316014160 and call sign XJBX. As the Lalandia Swan Denmark-International Register-flagged, MMSI 219961000 and call sign OYBT2. Ex-Trelsi renamed April 2001, and Euro Swan renamed 22 September 2011 Lalandia Swan and on 28 September 2017 Manitoulin. Built by Uljnik Shipyard, Pula, Croatia in 1991. Owned by Lower Lakes Towing *(subsidiary of Rand Logistis, Jersey City, New Jersey, USA), Port Dove, Canada and in 2014 bought from Uni Tankers, Middelfart, Denmark when she was a chemical tanker. The next step was to convert her into a bulk carrier which was done by connecting her stern section to a Chinese built self-unloading bow section by Chengxi Shipyards, Jiangyin. China in 2014-2015. 

British Davis Strait whaler Desko Boy in 1791

Homeport Newcastle, England, tonnage 323 tons and commandeur William Hamilton.

Source
A list of ships on the Greenland and Davis Straits whale fishery for 1791 by W.S. Ayres, oil-broker (No. 2), Birchin-Lane, Cornhill or Carolina-coffee-house. 

British Davis Strait whaler Eclipse in 1791

Homeport Newcastle, England, tonnage 289 tons and commandeur Codling.

Source
A list of ships on the Greenland and Davis Straits whale fishery for 1791 by W.S. Ayres, oil-broker (No. 2), Birchin-Lane, Cornhill or Carolina-coffee-house. 

Dutch shrimp cutter (ex-Charles Marie Therese 1954-1956, Donna Rosa 1964-1979, Grietje van Boukje I 1979-1990, Twee Gebroeders 1990, Dirk 1990-1991, Noorderlicht 1991-1994, Aaltje Margeritte 1994-1995, Noorderlicht 1995-2013, Linduenda 2013-2014)Hoop op Zegen (UK 12) 2014-


Inner harbour Vlissingen, Netherlands 14 September 2019

IMO 8432780, MMSI 245655000 and call sign PGHU. Built by Sabarn, Bruges, Belgium in 1954. Ex-Charles Marie Therese (Z556) 1954-1956, Donna Rosa (Z556) June 1964-June 1979, Grietje van Boukje I (UK 344) June 1979-February 1990, Twee Gebroeders (GO 77) February-September 1990, Dirk (UK 160) September 1990-May 1991, Noorderlicht (UK 56) May 1991-Airil 1994, Aaltje Margerite (UK 185) April 1994-August 1995, Noorderlicht (ZK. 185) August 1995-February 2013 2013 and Linduenda or Linquenda renamed February 2013-2014. 

Dutch lugger Gorinchem II (VL 42) in 1897

Owned by Joost Pot, Vlaardingen, Netherlands, master Pieter van der Hidde.

Note
1. The Dutch newspaper Vlaardingsche courant dated 5 June reported her departure on 3 June for her 1st voyage.

Source
Department Foreign Affairs (National Archive, The Hague, Netherlands) A-files inventory number 234. Naamlijst der Nederlandsche Reederijen en Haringschepen, benevens de sloepen, welke de kabeljauwvisscherij in de Noordzee uitoefenen; published by Dorsman&Odé, Vlaardingen, 1897.

Icelandic trawler(ex-Bjorgulfur 1977-) Hjalteyrin (EA-306) -2019

With courtesy of Hákon Guðmundsson, Skipaþjónusta, Samherji

Iceland-flagged, homeport Dalvik, IMO 7607065, MMSI 251178110 and call sign TFPY. Built by Palmer Johnson Norway, Flekkefjord, Norway in 1977. Owned and managed by Samherji, Akureyri, Iceland. 

Dutch lugger Gorinchem I (VL 41 ) in 1897

Owned by Joost Pot, Vlaardingen, Netherlands, master Cornelis van den Boogert Jr.

Note
1. The Dutch newspaper Vlaardingsche courant dated 5 June reported her departure on 3 June for her 1st voyage.

Source
Department Foreign Affairs (National Archive, The Hague, Netherlands) A-files inventory number 234. Naamlijst der Nederlandsche Reederijen en Haringschepen, benevens de sloepen, welke de kabeljauwvisscherij in de Noordzee uitoefenen; published by Dorsman&Odé, Vlaardingen, 1897.

Icelandic trawler (ex-Stella Kristina 1968-1972, Slettbakur 1972-2002, Akureyrin 2002-2009) Snaefell (EA 310) 2009-2019

With courtesy of Hákon Guðmundsson, Skipaþjónusta, Samherji

Iceland-flagged, homeport Akureyi, IMO 6828923, MMSI 251079000 and call sign TFBY. Built by Vard Soviknes, Sovik Norway in 1968. Owned and managed by Samherji, Akureyri, Iceland. Lengthened in 1987 and converted into a freezer trawler. 

Soviet barge No. 1002 delivered by Austrian Korneuburg shipyard according to a CIA report dated 6 August 1953

An item reported that the Austrian Korneuburg shipyard transferred the newly built barge No. 1002 with as dimensions 83 x 8,75 metres over to the Soviet Danube Shipping Company (SDGP) on 1 April 1953. The barge was no longer riveted but welded.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, document number CIA-RDP80-00810A001900030009-9

French inland motor cargo ship Edel Turquoise


Rouen, France 22 September 2016

France-flagged, ENI 01831503, MMSI 226006150 and call sign FM5857. 

The petroleum pump station near Lobau, Austria according to a CIA report dated 6 August 1953

An item reported that the large pump station situated 800-900 metres south of the Lobau refinery, Austria enlarged. The station dated from the Second World War, was completely underground and was used for pumping raw petroleum to rail and river tanker loading points including the Schwechat station. The station was fenced with barbed wire and guarded. Entering was not possible before the identification was valid. The personnel strength on the station was unknown, although on 27 and 28 March was the arrival of 200 labourers reported.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, document number CIA-RDP80-00810A001900030009-9

Dutch multi purpose dry cargo carrier/container ship Dagna 2005-



Rouen, France 22 September 2016

Netherlands-flagged, IMO 9313802, MMSI 246371000 and call sign PHDE. Owned by C..V. Scheepvaartonderneming Dagna, Delfzijl, Netherlands, operated and managed by Wagenborg Shipping, Delfzijl. Built by Ferus Smit Scheepswerf BV, Westerbork Netherlands. 

Enlargement of the Austrian Korneuburg shipyard according to a CIA report dated 6 August 1953

An item reported construction work at the Austrian Korneuburg shipyard including the building of 3 large shops. One was to be used for shipbuilding another as machine shop. Furthermore was a large five floor building under construction and which was to accommodate around 280 families.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, document number CIA-RDP80-00810A001900030009-9

Dutch general cargo ship Volgaborg 2013-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 8 November 2013

Netherlands-flagged, IMO 9631072, MMSI 246900000 and call sign PCSQ. Gross tonnage 7.367 tons, net tonnage 3.688 tons, summer deadweight 11.850 tons and as dimensions 142,65 (over all)  x 15,87 x 7,729 metres. Airdraft 30,6. Hold capacity 503.821. Built in 2013 at the Ferus Smit Scheepswerf, Hoogezand, Netherlands. Owned and managed by Royal Wagenborg Shipping, Delfzijl, Netherlands.

The Egyptian, Greek, and Turkish navies in the Mediterranean according to the Nederlandsche Staatscourant dated 13 August 1825

Trieste, 28 July. The master Ragencovich who sailed in 34 days from Constantinople towards Trieste reported officially that he was visited by 5 Greek brigs commanded by N. Tombasis the 14July off Cerigo and they confirmed that Ibrahim Pasha was defeated at Morea and taken prisoner.

Vienna, 1 August. The newspaper Oesterrechische Beobachter published a letter from Canea (island Candia) dated 20 June, apparently written by an Austrian officer who had joined the Turkish. He reported the events in June. The Greek squadrons with a total strength of 52 ships including 10 fire ships appeared off Suda 11 and 12 June intending to burn the Turkish fleets lying in the port of Suda. Miaulis promised each fire ship which succeeded in penetrating the port a payment of 1.000 piasters. The 14th attacked the Greeks the port. The fleet of the Captain pasha was lying in the mid of the port and Hussein Bey requested the admiral to be permitted to a counter attack with 17 corvettes and brigs. These ships send their armed barges with Hussein Bey in person on board to sea and which attacked 3 fire ships in the frontline. The Greeks were forced to leave and the fire ships were lost without any results. A fourth fire ship however managed to grasp an Egyptian corvette which due to awkwardness stranded and burnt. The Greeks retreated but attack the next day with 30 ships and again Hussein Bey went out. After a exchange of gunshots during nearly 2 hours both sides stopped. The 16th,17th and 18th were just a few Greek ships sighted although the wind was in these 3 days quite favourable for an attack. The Greeks claimed later that they succeeded in preventing the departure of the Turkish fleets. Later tidings as the editors of the Nederlandsche Staatscourant wrote reported that the Turkish fleets managed to leave to be sighted 23 June off Navarino. Hussein Bey was the admiral of the Egyptian fleet and made 3 voyages without any loss from Candia to Morea. He was described in the Dutch newspaper as a brave man, with the appearance of an ordinary Mameluk but very inquisitive. The Captain Pasha was a sensible and well educated person, praised deeply by his officers who he treated well. In a long conversation with the above mentioned Austrian officer the Captain Pasha praised Ibrahim pasha and his services to the Ottoman empire and he was convinced that the Greek revolt was ended.

Increase of British Home Fleet according to the Dutch newspaper Nieuwe Tilburgsche Courant dated 16 October 1906

Although recently news items were published that at the yards in North England 3 dreadnoughts were built published the newspaper The Standard apparently again the tiding that an important increase of the British fleet in the European waters was to be expected soon. The Admiralty intended for New Years Day to decommission 8 battleships 1st class and 4 armoured cruisers and to lay them up without a crew. Also were 8 battleships no longer in active service causing an decrease of 20 warships of the 1st class which was 25% of the complete fleet in active service. The Admiralty wanted to reduce the expenses by making the fleets excluded the Channel, Mediterranean and Atlantic forces while the paid off sailors of the ships no longer in sea service were used to strengthen the crews of the torpedo boats. Although the Standard expected denials she consisted in the reliability of her tiding.

The Greek navy in the Mediterranean according to the Nederlandsche Staatscourant dated 26 March 1827

Trieste, 10 March. Despite some tidings was the Greek steamship [Perseverance?} still able to service, despite she was damaged by the fire of some howitzers.

Liberian container ship MSC Alghero 2013-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 27 April 2015

Panama-flagged, IMO 9618288, MMSI 351819000 and call sign 3EVX2. Built by Sungdong Shipbuilding&Marine Engineering, Tongyoung, South Korea in 2013. Owned by Yepton Shipping, Monrovia, Liberia and managed by MSC Shipmanagement Cyprus, Limassol, Cyprus.

The Greek navy, Austrian merchant ships and the blockade of Turkish ports according to the Nederlandsche Staatscourant dated 1 July 1823

Trieste, Italy, 12 June. The Exchange made public that two armed Greek ships were cruising in the waters of Durazzo and the council advised all masters of merchant ships to take well care of their papers. If not, they were not supported by the government due to the recognition of the blockade of the Turkish ports. Original source was the newspaper Frankfurter Zeitung.

Movements of the Algerian, French and Greek navies in the Mediterranean according to the Nederlandsche Staatscourant dated 30 August 1827

Frankfurt, 25 August. The Greek Government at Poros made 11 June their decision dated the 9th public that the “Eretrischen” and the “Maliakischen” coasts and the island Negroponte were blockaded by the navy, which was to be strengthened.

Paris, 26 August. The Gazette de France published tidings from Alger dealing with the blockade of that harbour. The large Algerian warships were still inside the harbour. Just some feluccas managed to escape in the night while making use of their small draught. First it were only a few, in the meantime others joined them, making a line of ‘control’ possible between Bona in the East and Oran in the West. Although the Algerians feluccas are to small to extend their piracy into a larger area, they are dangerous for the unprotected ships between Cadiz and the Balearic Islands. Therefore are convoys made which regularly sailed between Marseille and Cadiz, and regularly French warships cruising between Algesiras and Carthagena. As far as known is the l’Arlequin until now the only French merchant ship captured. Her crew escaped on land when she was attacked by two feluccas. There is also a frigate and a brig towards the Azores send to patrol in these waters. Another frigate patrols between Cadiz and the Strait. The Mediterranean is cruised in all directions by the French navy.

British naval commission reorganizing Chilean navy according to the Dutch newspaper Het Vaderland: staat- en letterkundig nieuwsblad evening edition dated 18 September 1925

Berlin, 18 September. According to tidings from Santiago asked the Chilean president the British cabinet for a naval commission to reorganise the Chilean navy. The morning edition of this newspaper dated 23 March 1933 reported that the last member of this commission namely captain Victor Dorman-Smith returned to England. The commission came to Chile in 1928 (?) as request by president Alessandri to modernize the Chilean navy in which she complete succeeded. There was a complete reorganisation executed and the navy was modernized with the headquarters transferred from Valparaiso to Santiago. The Chilean government expended 10.000.000 pound sterling in England buying new ships and other equipment. Another Dutch newspaper the Nieuwe Rotterdamsche Courant evening edition reported on 16 March 1926 that 5 British navy officers arrived at Valparaiso to act as instructors of the Chilean navy.

Japanese car carrier Mercury Ace 2011-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 15 July 2014

Panama-flagged, IMO 9591052, MMSI 370644000 and call sign 3FNS7. Gross tonnage 59.409 tons, summer deadweight 19.110 tons and as dimensions 199 x 32 x 9,7 metres. Capacity 6.5000 CEU. Built in 2011 by Imabari Shipbuilding Marugame Yard, Marugame, Japan. Owned and managed by Shoei Kisen Kasiha Ltd. , Imabari, Japan. Elsewhere claimed part of the fleet of Höegh Autoliners.

The Austrian navy around 1849 as described by Edward P. Thompson

Thanks to the fact that nowadays more and more books are digitized we are able to read books that are some times for decades no longer available for the public for several reasons. That’s quite a pity while these books contains useful information while the archives are destroyed, incomplete or nor accessible.

P. 233: “The Imperial navy is small, possessing only as many ships as are absolutely necessary for the protection of the Austrian maritime commerce.

p. 234: In former times, when hostilities with the Turks were frequent, many vessels and flotillas were kept in the waters of the Danube; but the occasion having ceased, that armament no longer exists.The origin of the Austrian navy dates from the peace of Campoformio, by which a great portion of the Venetian Republic, with its lagunes, was ceded to Austria; which, possessing itself of its navy in 1798, held it till 1806, when Venice passed again into the hands of the French. Austria was by this event limited to the so-called Triestine navy, but which was also lost to it by the surrender of the coast-land to France. The convention of the 23rd April, 1814, restored Venice, the coast land, and their respective navies, again to Austria. The actual force of vessels equipped for service and available if required, consists of 3 frigates, of which one is the Admiral's flag-ship at Venice, 1 corvette, first class, 2 do. second class, 1 do. third class, 3 brigs, from 16 to 20 guns, 7 galliotts of 12, 47 gun-boats of 3, 2 schooners of 4, 1 steamer of 8, 1 transport brig.

p. 235: These are manned by 1470 men, and commanded by 2 vice-admirals, 2 rear-admirals, 16 captains, 110 lieutenants, 60 cadets. This array is so little imposing, and its capabilities so extremely limited, that it is highly entertaining to hear the Austrians attach the highest importance to its services at the battle of Navarino, of which victory they claim little less than the entire credit.”

Source
Edward P. Thompson. Austria. London, 1849.

The navy floating dock at Philadelphia according to the Senate executive documents 1857-1858

Thanks to the fact that nowadays more and more books are digitized we are able to read books that are some times for decades no longer available for the public for several reasons. That’s quite a pity while these books contains useful information while the archives are destroyed, incomplete or nor accessible.

P. 664: “The sectional floating dock at Philadelphia has been in frequent use during the past year, and is now in pretty good condition. This work being of perishable materials, it has been found necessary to construct iron floats in place of wooden ones. Six of these have been contracted for and are nearly completed. An estimate is submitted in another part of this report for additional iron tanks. This important structure requires constant care and watchfulness on the part of the superintendent.”

Source
The executive documents, printed by order of the senate of the United States, first session, thirty-fifth congress and special session of 1858. 1857-1858. 16 Volumes. Washington, 1858.

The French navy around 1852 according to Tait’s Edingburgh magazine

Thanks to the fact that nowadays more and more books are digitized we are able to read books that are some times for decades no longer available for the public for several reasons. That's quite a pity while these books contains useful information while the archives are destroyed, incomplete or nor accessible. In this specific magazine was an article titled “The National Defence Madness” published in which the British navy was compared with several other navies and the results were presented in the British Parliament.

P. 362: “With regard to the French navy, we find that it consisted ships old and new, great and small, and on the stocks in January, 1851, of 328 vessels, including steamers. Of this fleet, 40 were ranked as ships of the line, 10 of which were of the first class, 10 of the second, 15 of the third, and 5 of the fourth class. There are 50 frigates that is to say, 15 of the first class, or equal to British frigates of 42 to 50 guns; 20 of the second class, and 15 of the third class; 4 corvettes, or sloops of war; 50 brigs, 30 of the first class and 20 of the second; 30 vessels, including gun-brigs, schooners and tenders; and 1G transport-ships, averaging from 300 to 600 tons. Besides which, there are 102 steamers afloat and building in the slips. These include 50 packets, the largest of which are of 200 horse power, 30 of which are from 160 to 200 horse power, and 20 of 120 horse power and under. There are 10 steam-frigates of from 450 to 600 horse power ; 20 sloops or corvettes of from 320 to 400 horse power, 20 of from 220 to 300 horse power; and two floating-batteries, one of 400 and the other of 500 horse power. Four or five large ships have been ordered to be built since January, 1851, and some progress has been made in their construction. Several of the French line of battle ships and the larger frigates are magnificent vessels, their sailing-lines of admirable draught, and their models beautiful. Their cannons and arms are also admirable. Several of their screw steam-ships are strongly and firmly constructed, and efficiently fitted out; but generally their machinery is far inferior to that of England, and their speed slower than that of English steam-ships. None of them are equal, either in power or speed, to the fleet of the Cunard line, or to several of the ships of the West India and Peninsular lines. In rigging, we may also consider the French navy inferior to British ships. The ships of the line which were last year displayed at Cherbourg were the prime ships of the French navy; and, notwithstanding the enthusiastic admiration of them by one British admiral, we heard the manoeuvring condemned as unskilful by experienced naval officers. But still the navy of France is by no means to be despised. The deficiency will be found chiefly in the scarcity of able and skilful seamen to man them in case of war. According to the last account of the Minister of Marine, the French fleet was in such condition, that 23 ships of the line, 31 frigates, 35 corvettes, and 47 brigs were ready to be put into commission, together with 14 steam-frigates, 13 corvettes, and 34 small steam-packets. The number of officers, consisting of admirals, vice-admirals, rear-admirals, captains of ships of the line, post-captains, lieutenants, ensigns or midshipmen, and cadets, amounted to 1872. The number of seamen, including marines, the greater part of whom have never been at sea, was decreed to be 27,000. The French mercantile navy is comparatively insignificant. As far as we can learn, there are not in it 15 ships above 500 tons. We have in the Thames one single firm who own 20 ships of from 1000 to 1,400 tons, fit for frigates ; and other London firms, and firms in Newcastle and Glasgow, have fleets nearly as magnificent. The following is the number of French naval officers and seamen: 2 admirals, 10 vice-admirals, 20 rear admirals, 110 captains of ships of the line, 230 captains of frigates, 050 lieutenants, 550 midshipmen, 300 cadets; total, 1,872 officers, and 20,000 seamen of all kinds in active sea service and in the ports. The naval expenditure of France, which includes that of the colonies, amounted in 1851 to the following sums: Central administration or Admiralty, 868,500f. (£34,840); scientific expenses, 404,100f. (£16,104); colonial expenditure (not including Algiers), 17,902,000f. (£716,080); for extraordinary constructions and other works, 3,955,000f. (£1!)8,200.) The total expenditure amounted to 106,449,413f. (£4,257,976 13s.); which sum includes the whole of the ordnance of the naval department of France. The interest of the debt of France was, for 1851, 391,154,760f. (4.'15,610,190 10i.), and the total expenditure of France for 1851 amounted to l,434,034,047f. (£57,385,361, 18s. 4d.) This included the expenses of collection and 80,000,000f. of drawbacks, reimbursements and premiums allowed for various exemptions, which reduced the amount by 3,200,000f. leaving a net expenditure of £54,185,361 18s. Id. for 35,500,000 of a population.”

Source
William Tait. “The National Defence Madness: in: Tait’s Edingburgh magazine, January-December 1852.

The French navy off Tangier according to the Nederlandsche Staatscourant dated 26 August 1844

The French squadron was 9 August still off Tangier repairing the damage caused by the shore batteries to two of her ships. The prince de Joinville send a steam vessel to Cadiz for coal and other stores. He was to depart 11 of 12 August immediately to Mogador.

Chinese general cargo ship Kraszewski 2011-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 15 August 2014

Cyprus-flagged, homeport Limassol, IMO 9432153, MMSI 209355000 and call sign 5BKF3.

The Turkish navy in the Levant according to the Nederlandsche Staatscourant dated 22 August 1838

According to tidings from Smyrna dated 28 July was the Turkish fleet since some days anchored off Mitylene. The Capudan Pasha was expected to arrive today. A squadron of 8 or 10 ships of which the flag was not recognized was the last sighted between Milo and Candia. It was suspected that it was the British fleet. According tot tidings from Constantinople were all Turkish ships which lately departed with special orders ordered to join the Capudan pasha as soon as possible. When the fleet left the Bosporus they left there behind 3 ships of the line, 1 frigate, 2 corvettes and 2 cutters. In the arsenal were at that moment another 2 frigates, 2 corvettes and some smaller vessels

French naval forces strengthened ? according tot the Dutch newspaper Het nieuws van den dag voor Nederlandsch-Indië dated 22 February 1905

When the naval budget was discussed in the French Parliament some representatives plead the necessity of strengthening the forces in Indochina regarded the rise of Japan as a maritime power.

Algerian, British, French and Spanish naval movements according to the Dutch newspaper Ommelander Courant dated 23 August 1793

Lisbon, 22 July. Two British frigates arrived last night with the tiding that the united British-Spanish fleet of 78 ships arrived off Toulon while escorting a large number of transports with war stores and soldiers. Off Corsica found a heavy fight place between a 28-gun Algerian frigate (also armed with some swivels) and 1 30-gun French frigate. After 5 hours stopped the fight but with sunrise the fight was renewed. Despite some failed efforts the Algerians finally managed to come on board of the French frigate and after a fierce fight the French surrendered. The Algerians lost more as 200 men and all of their officers of which the boatswain as last commanding officer until he also died. According to rumours both frigates sunk the next day while the survivors were taken on board of a Tunisian bark.

Dutch merchant bark ship Nieuw-Lekkerland launched at Kinderdijk, Netherlands according to the Dutch newspaper Zierikzeesche Courant dated Tuesday 28 June 1842

At Kinderdijk was the bark ship Nieuw-Lekkerland of 450 Java lasten launched.(1)

Note
1. In 1826 was the standard to calculate the cargo capacity of a ship the so-called roggelast (rogge=rye) of 2.075 kilos. In 1827 made the Nederlandsche Handels Maatschappij a list of all colonial products with their weights corresponding with the space needed for one roggelast. This became known as the Java last. For instance the weight of a Java last tea was 1.000 kilo, of pepper 1.600, of rice 2.000 and of coffee 1.500 kilo (in the practice in fact 1.800).

Dutch heavy load carrier Happy Ranger 1998-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 14 August 2014

Dutch-flagged. Homeport Amsterdam. IMO 9139311, MMSI 245539000 and call sign PCER. Gross tonnage 10.990 tons, summer deadweight 12.950 tons and as dimensions 138 x 22 x 7,5 metres. Built in 1998 at Damen Schelde Naval Shipbuilding, Flushing, Netherlands. Owned and managed by Spliethoff’s Bevrachtingskantoor, Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Japanese mine service according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1937 no. 4

An item referred to the magazine Le Yacht dated 17 April 1937 reporting that Japan built between 1923-1928 10-615 ton minesweepers with a horsepower of 2.000 hp, a speed of 20 knots and an armament consisting of 2-12cm guns and 1-8,6cm gun. Between 1931-1935 were 6-492 ton minesweepers built with a similar armament and speed but with a draught less then 1,85 metres.

The Brazilian and Portuguese navies at Bahia according to the Nederlandsche Staatscourant dated 3 September 1823

London, 29 August. According to tidings from Bahia refused lord Cochrane the proposal made by general Madeira to hand over the town if the latter was allowed to return with the Portuguese warships towards Portugal. Lord Cochrane had strict orders that none ship had to escape and wanted to capture them all.

Danish merchant ship captured by Spanish privateers according to the Nederlandsche Staatscourant dated 3 September 1823

Copenhagen, 23 August. According to some rumours were several Danish merchant ships captured by Spanish privateers.

Naval operations of the Dutch East Company off the West Coast of Sumatra according to the Generale Missive dated 31 March 1738

The Boot arrived 8 February at Batavia from the West Coast of Sumatra with 1808 tael gold and 45824lb benzoë with a total value of fl. 126.834.

Source
J. van Goor. Generale Missiven van Gouverneurs-Generaal en Raden aan Heren XVII der Verenigde Oostindische Compagnie. Deel X: 1737-1743. The Hague, 2004, p. 95-96.

The Greek and the Turkish navies according to the Nederlandsche Staatscourant dated 24 August 1824

Odessa, 30 July. According to letters from Constantinople dated 22 July were the first Turkish tidings dealing with Greek losses at Ipsara exaggerated. The newspaper Oesterreischer Beobachter spoke of 100 ships lost, the Turkish first 50 but now of 20. It’s confirmed that the main part of the navy of Ipsara joined that of Hydra.

Monday, 21 October 2019

Former Dutch life-boat Carlot 1960-


Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 13 July 2019

Her building at the shipyard v/h H. Schouten N.V., Muiden, Netherlands was financed by Miss C.M.J. Meyer which desired that the boat would be named Carlot. Baptized and commissioned at Terschelling, Netherlands on 28 November 1960. Decommissioned in September 2000 still serving at Terschelling. Sold to the Stichting Carlo at Elburg, Netherlands and since September 2014 berthed at Terneuzen, Netherlands. Of the Prins Hendrik design although with a larger width. Speed 10,6 knots. Her crew in active service numbered 5 persons.

Hungarian inland barge No. 703 to be ceded to Czechoslovakia in 1921

After the First World War (1914-1918) lost by the German, Austro-Hungarian and Ottoman Empires was Walker D. Hines appointed as international arbitrator responsible for the ceding of tugs and other inland vessels by Germany, Bulgaria, Austria and Hungary to the Allied Powers. For Austria respectively Hungary were the Treaties of St. Germain and Trianon leading. Lists were made of the involved vessels including some details and what their fate was to be.

A list dated Paris, France 2 August 1921 reported that Hungary possessed for service on the Danube the MFTR inland barge No. 703 with a tonnage of 667,5 tons which was to ceded to Czechoslovakia and already in Czechoslovakian possession.(1)

Note
1. MFTR=Mahart (Magyar Folyam – és Tengerhajózási Részvénytársaság).

Source
Reports of International Arbitral Awards. Navigation on the Danube, 2 August 1921, volume 1. UN, 2006.

Dutch twin screw tug (ex-Afon Goch 1997-2018) DCS Explorer 2018-



Inner harbour Vlissingen, Netherlands13 July 2019

United Kingdom-flagged, IMO 9150781, MMSI 232002785 and call sign MWIP7. Built as the Afon Goch by Hepworth Shipyard, Kingston upon Hull, United Kingdom for Holyhead Towing in 1997. Now owned by DCS=Delta Coastal Services, Vlissingen, Netherlands (since April 2018?). Gross register tonnage 129,3 tons, deadweight 144 tons and as dimensions 23,8 (over all) x 7,5 x 3,25 9depth) x 2 (aft) metres. Bollard pull 19 tonnes. Speed while free running 11,1 knots