Translate

Saturday, 15 December 2018

British platform supply ship (ex-SBS Tempest 2006-2014) Nanna Viking 2014-



Sloe/Vlissingen-Oost, Netherlands 3 July 2015

Norway-flagged, IMO 9366835, MMSI 257153000 and call sign LAVY7. Owned and managed by Viking Supply Ships UK Aberdeen, United Kingdom. Ex-SBS Tempest renamed 29 September 2014. Built by Karmsund Maritime Services, Kopervik, Norway in 2006 (Shipspotting) at Santierul Naval Severnav, Severin, Romania (mtelegraph.com). As SBS Tempest United Kingdom-flagged, homeport Aberdeen, MMSI 235010790 and owned/managed by Viking Supply Ships, Copenhagen, Denmark. Since September 215 in cold lay-up and sold on 27 June 2018. 

The Hungarian screw motor tug Etel according to a CIA report dated 3 December 1953

An item reported that the Hungarian-Soviet Shipping Company (Magyar-Szovjet Hajozasi Reszvenytarsasag=Meszhart) possessed the modern built oil fuelled screw tug Etel of a horsepower of 800hp (continue rating) and able to take a cargo of around 500 tons herself.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, document number CIA-RDP80-00810A003000260005-5

East German tug No. 329 according to a CIA report dated 14 December 1953

An item reported that after 1 May 1953 was added to the fleet of the East German Deutsche Schiffahrts- und Umschlagsbetreibe (DSU) and stationed at DSU-Magdeburg the open tug with as number 329 and capacity of 520 tons.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, document number CIA-RDP81-01036R000100070044-6

Belgian tug (ex-Exact 2010-2011, ex-Tango 2011, RT Samba 2011) Smit Kiwi 2011-


Zeebrugge, Belgium 30 June 2018

Belgium-flagged, IMO 9454321, MMSI 205619000 and call sign ORQF. Tug annex fire fighting vessel. Built at the ASL Shipyard Private Limited, Singapore with yard number H895 in 2010. Gross tonnage 377 tons, displacement 97 tons and as dimensions 27,7 x 11,5 5,24 metres. Ex-Exact of Lütgens&Reimers A.G., Hamburg, Germany since March 2010, renamed Tango 26 April 2011, renamed RT Samba 29 April 2011, owned by Kooren Shipbuilding&Trading B.V., Rotterdam, Netherlands since 30 June 2011, of ASL Ofshore&Marine Pte. Ltd., Singapore since 30 June 2011, in the same year of KST B.V., Rotterdam, renamed Smit Kiwi of Smit Shipping Singapore Private Limited, Singapore since December 2011 and since April 2012 of Smit Harbour Towage Northwest Euroepe N.V., Zeebrugge, Belgium.

Austrian SDDG tug Slavonia became Yugoslavian according to a list dated 2 August 1921

After the First World War (1914-1918) lost by the German, Austro-Hungarian and Ottoman Empires was Walker D. Hines appointed as international arbitrator responsible for the ceding of tugs and other inland vessels by Germany, Bulgaria, Austria and Hungary to the Allied Powers. For Austria respectively Hungary were the Treaties of St. Germain and Trianon leading. Lists were made of the involved vessels including some details and what their fate was to be.

A list dated Paris, France 2 August 1921 reported that the Austrian SDDG tug Slavonia with a horsepower of 350hp was seized and of which the nationality and ownership was confirmed to be the Serb-Croat-Slovene-Kingdom.(1)

Note
1. The Kingdom of Yugoslavia was formed on 1 December 1918 with merging the provisional State of Slovenes, Croats and Serbs (officially proclaimed on 29 October 1918) with the formerly independent Kingdom of Serbia. The latter kingdom was since 28 November 1918 united with the Kingdom of Montenegro. The Kingdom of Yugoslavia was until 3 October 1929 officially titled the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes.

Source
Reports of International Arbitral Awards. Navigation on the Danube, 2 August 1921, volume 1. UN, 2006.

Russian dry cargo ship Kondopoga 1967-no longer existing


Russia-flagged, IMO 7124453 and call sign EWSF. Built by Navashinskiy Shipyard, Navashino in in 1967. Of the Far Eastern Shipping Company, Vladivostok. Of the Sibirles I-type consisting of the: Sibirles, Vyatkales, Manzovka, Terney, Egvekinot, Verkhoyanskles, Jakutskles, Prokopiy Galushin, Korsakov, Vzmorye, Jana, Selenga, Ajan, Omolon, Aldan, Kem, Lakhta, Kondopoga and Unyzha.

General technical characteristics of the Sibirles I type. Deadweight 3.797 (general cargo)-4.167 tons (timber), deadweight cargo capacity or net deadweight tonnage 3.337 (general cargo)-3.360 (timber) tons, gross register tonnage 3.231 and net register tonnage 1.488 tons. Dimensions 104,40 (over al) x 14,37 (moulded) x 7,12 (depth to man deck) x 22,40 (height mast above main deck) x loaded draught fore 5,92 (general cargo)-6,3 (timber) - mean 6,05 (general cargo)-6,37 (timber) –aft (6,19 general cargo)-6,42 (timber metres and light draught 1,19 (fore)-2,56 (mean)-3,94 (aft) metres. Four holds. Total bale capacity 5.085 and grain 5.433 cubic metres. Speed 13,5 (full loaded)-14,0 (in ballast) knots.

Germany claimed losing inland tug S.I. according to a list dated 2 August 1921

After the First World War (1914-1918) lost by the German, Austro-Hungarian and Ottoman Empires was Walker D. Hines appointed as international arbitrator responsible for the ceding of tugs and other inland vessels by Germany, Bulgaria, Austria and Hungary to the Allied Powers. For Austria respectively Hungary were the Treaties of St. Germain and Trianon leading. Lists were made of the involved vessels including some details and what their fate was to be.

A list dated Paris, France 2 August 1921 reported that Germany was missing the non-ZTL (1) Bayerische Lloyd inland tug S.I. with a horsepower of 28 hp of which the Serb-Croat-Slovene Kingdom (2), Romania and France denied to possess her.

Notes
1. ZTL=Navigation Group under supreme army command/war department.
2. The Kingdom of Yugoslavia was formed on 1 December 1918 with merging the provisional State of Slovenes, Croats and Serbs (officially proclaimed on 29 October 1918) with the formerly independent Kingdom of Serbia. The latter kingdom was since 28 November 1918 united with the Kingdom of Montenegro. The Kingdom of Yugoslavia was until 3 October 1929 officially titled the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes.

Source
Reports of International Arbitral Awards. Navigation on the Danube, 2 August 1921, volume 1. UN, 2006.

Belgian tug Smit Tiger 2009-

Zeebrugge, Belgium 30 June 2018

Belgian-flagged, IMO 9454888, MMSI 205565000 and call sign ORPO. Gross tonnage 484 tons and as dimensions 32,14 x 13,29 x 5,50 metres. Bollard pull 95 tons. Since August 2009 by URS Belgie N.V., Antwerp/Zeebrugge, Belgium. Fitted out with 2x16cylinder Caterpillar C280-8?MC. Built by Damen Song Cam Shipyard, Haipong, Vietnam with yard number 513004. Damen ASD3213 tug. 

Hungarian tug Marianna became Yugoslavian according to a list dated 2 August 1921

After the First World War (1914-1918) lost by the German, Austro-Hungarian and Ottoman Empires was Walker D. Hines appointed as international arbitrator responsible for the ceding of tugs and other inland vessels by Germany, Bulgaria, Austria and Hungary to the Allied Powers. For Austria respectively Hungary were the Treaties of St. Germain and Trianon leading. Lists were made of the involved vessels including some details and what their fate was to be.

A list dated Paris, France 2 August 1921 reported that the Hungarian MFTR (1) tug Marianna with a horsepower of 150hp was seized and of which the nationality and ownership was confirmed to be the Serb-Croat-Slovene-Kingdom.(2)

Notes
1. MFTR= Magyar Kirälyi Folyam- es Tengerhajözäsi Reszvenytärsasäg (Mahart).
2. The Kingdom of Yugoslavia was formed on 1 December 1918 with merging the provisional State of Slovenes, Croats and Serbs (officially proclaimed on 29 October 1918) with the formerly independent Kingdom of Serbia. The latter kingdom was since 28 November 1918 united with the Kingdom of Montenegro. The Kingdom of Yugoslavia was until 3 October 1929 officially titled the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes.

Source
Reports of International Arbitral Awards. Navigation on the Danube, 2 August 1921, volume 1. UN, 2006.

Maltese fishing vessel (Kristure.1) VLT MFA 89



Malta, 1 May 2018

Malta-flagged, homeport Valletta. 

Dutch warship Meerman 1628

Of the admiralty Amsterdam, mentioned 1628, an armament of 24 guns (1-18pd bronze chamber, 1-12pd bronze chamber, 6-8pd gotelingen, 8-5pd (gotelingen, 6 steenstukken), a crew numbering 70 men and a measurement of 100 last. Commanded by captain Bartholomeus de Ster. A list dated 1631 mentioned her as wrecked. 

Dutch warship Meerman 1604-1621

Of the admiralty Amsterdam, built 1604, last mentioned 1621, an armament of 20-22 guns, a crew numbering 70 men and a measurement of 90-100 last. Minute States-General dated 22 April 1606 pointed out for of the expedition towards Spain and Portugal, commanding officer Dierck Jasparsz Cleynsorge.

Maltese fishing vessel MFC 502

Malta, 1 May 2018

Dutch warship Hollandia 1652-1653

Of the admiralty Amsterdam, first mentioned in 1652, sunk in action in 1653, dimensions (Amsterdam foot) 120 x 29 x 11, height above hold 6¾, an armament of 32 guns and a crew numbering 140 men

Dutch warship Hollandia 1616-1621

Of the admiralty Maze, mentioned in 1621 as 5 years old, with an armament of 14 guns, a crew numbering 85 men and a measurement of 125 last. 

Maltese fishing vessel Little Winston (VLT MFC5007)

Malta, 1 May 2018

Dutch warship Holland 1617-1619

Of the admiralty Amsterdam, first mentioned in 1617, given away given to East India company in 1619, with a crew numbering 130 men and a measurement of 300 last. 

Dutch warship Hollandia 1653-1659

Of the admiralty Amsterdam, built in 1653, last mentioned in 1659, dimensions (Amsterdam foot) 142 x 34½ x 14½, an armament of 44 guns and a crew numbering 100 men. 

Friday, 14 December 2018

Faroe Islands-flagged general cargo ship (ex-Fortunia 1996, Sea Rover 1996-1999, Mercosul Brasil 1999-2000, Fortunia 2000-2017) Kubilai Khan 2017-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 14 July 2018

As the Kubilai Khan, Faroe Islands-flagged, IMO 8913722, MMSI 231806000 and call sign OZ2166. Built at the Northern Shipyard, Gdansk, Poland in 1996. As the Fortunia, Antigua&Barbuda-flagged, homeport Saint John’s, MMSI 304010638, call sign V2OG3 and owned and managed by BBC Burger Bereederung, Burg Dithmarschen, Germany. Ex-Fortunia renamed 12 September 1996, Sea Rover renamed 15 June 1999, Mercosul Brasil renamed Fortunia on 21 March 2000. On 10 January registered as Kubilai Khan in the Faroe Islands International Ship Register. 

Dutch 2nd charter Hollandia 1683-1698

Of the admiralty Amsterdam, built by Jan van Rheenen at naval yard at Amsterdam, Netherlands in 1683, wrecked in 1698, dimensions (Amsterdam foot) 156 (prow) x 40 x 15 and armament of 72-74 guns. 

Dutch warship Hollandse Tuin 1628-1631

Of the admiralty Noorderkwartier, mentioned between 1628-1631, an armament of 34-42 guns, a crew numbering 115-120 men and a measurement of 180 last. 

Greek reefer (ex-Ivar Laurizen 1990-2011) Ivar Reefer 2011-


Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 25 June 2016

Bahamas-flagged, homeport Nassau, IMO 8819938, MMSI 311062300 and call sign C6ZP6. Built by Danyard, Frederikshavn, Denmark in 1990. Ex-Ivar Lauritzen renamed December 2011. Owned and managed by Chartworld Shipping, Athens, Greece. 

Dutch warship Hollandse Tuin 1632-1662

Of the admiralty Noorderkwartier, built in 1632, last mentioned in 1662, an armament of 32-36 guns, a crew numbering 97-110 men and a measurement of 250 last. 

Dutch warship Hollandse Tuin 1652-1653

Of the admiralty Amsterdam, mentioned between 1652-1653, dimensions (Amsterdam foot) 116 x 26 x 11½, height above hold 6, an armament of 24 guns and a crew numbering 120 men. 

Japanese bulk carrier Ocean Rainbow 2011-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 1 December 2018

Panama-flagged, IMO 9598024, MMSI 370867000 and call sign HPKG. Owned and managed by Doun Kisen, Imabari, Japan. Built by Minaminippon Shipbuilding, Usuki, Japan in 2011. 

Dutch warship Hond 1625-1631

Of the admiralty Zeeland, mentioned between 1625-1631, an armament of 12-18 guns, a crew numbering 80-115 men and a measurement of 150-160 last. Sources: {59} 150 last. {94}. {275} 160 last. 

Dutch fire ship Hoop 1666

Of the admiralty Zealand?, paid off 18 October 1666, commanded by Pieter Lievensse. 

Ukrainian bulk carrier Floriana 2012-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 20 November 2018

Malta-flagged, homeport Valletta, IMO 9486477, MMSI 229033000 and call sign 9HA3009. Built by 21st Century Shipbuilding, Tongyoung, South Korea in 2012. Owned and managed by Transship Bulk, Odessa, Ukraine. 

Hungarian tug Vezer became Yugoslavian according to a list dated 2 August 1921

After the First World War (1914-1918) lost by the German, Austro-Hungarian and Ottoman Empires was Walker D. Hines appointed as international arbitrator responsible for the ceding of tugs and other inland vessels by Germany, Bulgaria, Austria and Hungary to the Allied Powers. For Austria respectively Hungary were the Treaties of St. Germain and Trianon leading. Lists were made of the involved vessels including some details and what their fate was to be.

A list dated Paris, France 2 August 1921 reported that the Hungarian MBR tug Vezer with a horsepower of 280hp was seized and of which the nationality and ownership was confirmed to be the Serb-Croat-Slovene-Kingdom.(1)

Note
1. The Kingdom of Yugoslavia was formed on 1 December 1918 with merging the provisional State of Slovenes, Croats and Serbs (officially proclaimed on 29 October 1918) with the formerly independent Kingdom of Serbia. The latter kingdom was since 28 November 1918 united with the Kingdom of Montenegro. The Kingdom of Yugoslavia was until 3 October 1929 officially titled the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes.

Source
Reports of International Arbitral Awards. Navigation on the Danube, 2 August 1921, volume 1. UN, 2006.

Thursday, 13 December 2018

Maltese fishing vessel VLT MFA 1564

Marsaxlokk Harbour, Malta 14 May 2018

Dutch guard ship Expeditie 1781

Of the admiralty Friesland, a so-called uitlegger, mentioned in 1781, with an armament of 6 guns. 

Dutch transport Expeditie 1797-1799

Of the department Amsterdam, bought from East India Company in 1797, sold to be broken up in 1799, with an armament of 16 guns. 

Maltese fishing vessel MFC 4292 VLT

Marsaxlokk Harbour, Malta 14 May 2018

Dutch warship Faam or Vliegende Faam 1652-1653

Of the board Amsterdam, hired between 1652-1653, dimensions (Amsterdam foot) 116 x 11 x 28, height below orlopdeck 7, an armament of 28 guns (12-12pdr 8-8pd, 6-6pd, 2-3pd) and a crew numbering 105 men. 

Maltese fishing vessel VLT MFA 55

Marsaxlokk Harbour, Malta 14 May 2018

Dutch warship Marcus Curtius 1652

Of the admiralty Amsterdam, Netherlands, seized by British in 1652, dimensions (Amsterdam foot) 120 x 25 x 11, height above hold 5½, an armament of 24 guns and a crew numbering 100 men. 

Maltese fishing vessel Adriana

Marsaxlokk Harbour, Malta 14 May 2018

Malta-flagged, homeport Valletta. 

Dutch guard ship Margarethe 1782

Of the admiralty Amsterdam, a so-called uitlegger, mentioned between 1781-1782. Commanded in 1782 by captain Breed. 

Maltese fishing vessel Michelerosaria

Marsaxlokk Harbour, Malta 14 May 2018

Homeport Valletta, Malta. 

Dutch transport Margareta 1688

Of the admiralty Maze, Netherlands, hired Rotterdam, Netherlands to bring king-stadholder William III to England for ƒ 500 in October 1688, dimensions 70 x 19 x 9 feet, master Arij Thuijn, appraised value of ship ƒ 4.200. 

Dutch warship Maria 1652

Of the admiralty Amsterdam, captured by British in 1652, dimensions (Amsterdam foot) 134¾ x 29 x 13'9", height above hold 6'3", an armemnt of 30 guns, a crew numbering 120 men, with back and schans. 

Maltese fishing vessels Salvatur-V and Carmelo Padre

Marsaxlokk Harbour, Malta 14 May 2018

Malta-flagged, homeport Valletta. 

Dutch galliot Eva of Juffrouw Eva 1690-1694

Of the, admiralty Amsterdam, hired between 1690-1694

Dutch warship Ever 1628-1629

Of the admiralty Maze, mentioned between 1628-1629.

Wednesday, 12 December 2018

Maltese fishing vessel Leonardo da Vinci I

Marsaxlokk Harbour, Malta 14 May 2018

Homeport Valletta. 

Dutch Afrikaans Galei 1747-1748

Of the admiralty Zeeland, frigate, a so-called uitlegger, hired from Commercie te Middelburg, monthly rental price ƒ 1000, hired between 17 August 1747-1748, with an armament of 18-22 guns, 6 swivels and a crew numbering 75 men. Fitted out from Vlissingen, Netherlands, in 1747 commanded by commandeur Blonkebijlt, lying in the Biervlietse Gat. 

Maltese fishing vessel Sea Hunt III

Marsaxlokk Harbour, Malta 14 May 2018

Homeport Valletta. 

Dutch fire ship Afrikaan 1700-1712

Of the admiralty Noorderkwartier, mentioned between 1700-1712, with a crew numbering 30-70 men. In 1701 fire ship, with a crew numbering 30 men, commanded by captain Willem Speelman, in 1702 frigate, a crew numbering 70 men, commanded by captain Jan Kuyper, protected seaways around Texel. 

Maltese fishing vessel VLT MFA 280

Marsaxlokk Harbour, Malta 14 May 2018

Homeport Valletta. Called Consigliore...?

Dutch 8th charter Ajax 1781-1785

Of the admiralty Amsterdam, also called advice yacht and cutter, launched in 1779, bought in England in 1780 or in 1781, last mentioned>1783-1785<, wrecked in 1784?. dimensions 105 x ? x ?, with an armament of 20-24 guns and a crew numbering 150 men. Commanding officers in 1781 1781 captain G. van Welderen, in 1782-1784 lieutenant C.A. Petersen (Adriaan Pieterson?). 

Maltese fishing vessel Dielja

Marsaxlokk Harbour, Malta 14 May 2018

Homeport Valletta. 

Dutch warship Bruinvis 1599-1600

Of the admiralty Zeeland, first mentioned in 1599, sold in 1600

Dutch carvel or carvel ship Bruinvis 1606-1610

Of the admiralty Zeeland, built in 1606, last mentioned in 1610

Maltese fishing vessel Martina I

Marsaxlokk Harbour, Malta 14 May 2018

Homeport Valletta. 

Dutch warship Bruinvis 1614-1623

Of the admiralty Amsterdam, built in 1614, last mentioned in 1623, measurement 150 last, voyage to Portugal, commandeur Corneliss de Bagijn in 1622-1623

Tuesday, 11 December 2018

Swedish convoys according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated 20 April 1782.

Stockholm, 31 March. According to an order dated 12 April dealing with the Swedish convoys were the Swedish merchant ships to assemble off Ellsinore [Elezeneur]. There were four convoys:
1st convoy to depart 29 May towards the Mediterranean with the frigate Sprengporten and which frigate was to return from there 1 September while escorting the merchant ships coming from Malaga
2nd convoy to depart from the Sont 14 July with the frigate Postillon destined towards Cape Finisterre and back
3rd convoy from with the Sont with the same destination to depart 31 August the frigate Illerim
4th convoy from the Sont towards Livorno to depart 30 September with the frigate Gripen which frigate was to go in the end of February 1783 with special orders to Morocco and from to come back to Karlskrona while escorting Swedish merchant ships.
There were no other ships allowed to join these convoys unless they obeyed the Royal order dated 18 February 1779 and the Laws of the Armed Neutrality. Ships were allowed at open sea to leave the squadron.

Norwegian anchor handling vessel Bos Turquesa 2007-

Computer line drawing made by Lazer_one, with our thanks


Brazil-flagged, homeport Rio de Janeiro, IMO 9329966, MMSI 710002990 and call sign PPTZ. Gross tonnage 3.628 tons, summer deadweight 2.640 tons with as dimensions 80,4 (over all) x 18,00 (moulded) x 6,6 (maximum) metres. Bollard pull 190 tons. UT 722L typ. Built at the shipyard Estaleiro Itajai, Itajai, Brazil with yard number EI-143 in 2007. Owned and managed by Farstad Shipping ASA, Aalesund, Norway. 

Norwegian anchor handling vessel Bourbon Crown 2001-

Computer line drawing made by Lazer_one, with our thanks


Norway-flagged, homeport Fosnavaag, IMO 92369, MMSI 258164000 and callsign LMLY. Ex-Havila Crown renamed October 2003. Gross tonnage 3.154 tons, net tonnage 1.221 tons, a summer deadweight of 2.851 tons and as dimensions 69,30 (between perpendiculars)-80,00 (over all) x 18,99 (moulded) x 6,60 (maximum) and a moulded depth of 8,00 metres. Deck cargo 900 tons, deck area 570 square metres, fuel(gasoil) bunker capacity 1.150 cubic metres. Total horsepower 16.800 bhp. Bollard pull 197 (continued)-210 (maximum) tons,  Speed 12 (economic)-14,6 (service)-17,0 (maximum) knots. Built in 2001 by STX OSV Langston (Langsten Slip&Batbyggeri AS), Tomrefjord, Norway. Owned and managed by Bourbon Offshore Norway, Fosnavaag, Norway. 

Maltese fishing vessel VLT MFA 6010

Marsaxlokk Harbour, Malta 14 May 2018

Austrian tug Nyil became Romanian according to a list dated 2 August 1921

After the First World War (1914-1918) lost by the German, Austro-Hungarian and Ottoman Empires was Walker D. Hines appointed as international arbitrator responsible for the ceding of tugs and other inland vessels by Germany, Bulgaria, Austria and Hungary to the Allied Powers. For Austria respectively Hungary were the Treaties of St. Germain and Trianon leading. Lists were made of the involved vessels including some details and what their fate was to be.

A list dated Paris, France 2 August 1921 reported that the Austrian DDSG (1) tug Nyil with a horsepower of 180hp was seized and of which the nationality and ownership was confirmed to be Romania.

Note
1. DDSG=Erste Donau-Dampschiffahrtsgesellschaft.

Source
Reports of International Arbitral Awards. Navigation on the Danube, 2 August 1921, volume 1. UN, 2006.

Maltese fishing vessel MFA 6022 VLT

Marsaxlokk Harbour, Malta 14 May 2018

Whereabouts of Hungarian inland tug Liget unknown according to a list dated 2 August 1921

After the First World War (1914-1918) lost by the German, Austro-Hungarian and Ottoman Empires was Walker D. Hines appointed as international arbitrator responsible for the ceding of tugs and other inland vessels by Germany, Bulgaria, Austria and Hungary to the Allied Powers. For Austria respectively Hungary were the Treaties of St. Germain and Trianon leading. Lists were made of the involved vessels including some details and what their fate was to be.

A list dated Paris, France 2 August 1921 reported that the Hungarian inland D. Szekcso tug Liget with a horsepower of 40 hp was missing but that neither France, Romania or the Serb-Croat-Slovene Kingdom claimed to have seized her.

Source
Reports of International Arbitral Awards. Navigation on the Danube, 2 August 1921, volume 1. UN, 2006.

Maltese fishing vessel MI Carmel (MFA-248)

Marsaxlokk Harbour, Malta 14 May 2018

Polish tug Romek according to a CIA report dated 20 May 1954

An item reported the Polish tug Romek with a gross register tonnage of 79 tons, a horsepower of 200 hp, built in 1951 and as homeport Szczecin, Poland. Also used as an icebreaker on the Oder river

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, document number CIA-RDP80-00810A004001050003-8

Maltese fishing vessels Adriana and Madonna Ta’Fatima

Marsaxlokk Harbour, Malta 14 May 2018

Homeport Valletta

Dutch frigate Domburg 1638-captured

Of the admiralty Zealand, built by Joan Keijser under contract at Veere, Netherlands in 1638, dimensions 90 (prow)/72 (keel x 22½ (maximum) x 9 feet. First captain Swart from Veere. Building costs 1037 pond Vlaams. 

Maltese fishing vessel MFA 7502 VLT

Marsaxlokk Harbour, Malta 14 May 2018

Hungarian inland tug Palanka-Ilok became Yugoslavian according to a list dated 2 August 1921

After the First World War (1914-1918) lost by the German, Austro-Hungarian and Ottoman Empires was Walker D. Hines appointed as international arbitrator responsible for the ceding of tugs and other inland vessels by Germany, Bulgaria, Austria and Hungary to the Allied Powers. For Austria respectively Hungary were the Treaties of St. Germain and Trianon leading. Lists were made of the involved vessels including some details and what their fate was to be.

A list dated Paris, France 2 August 1921 reported that the Hungarian inland Piss Co. tug Palanka-Ilok with a horsepower of 35 hp belonged now to the Serb-Croat-Slovene Kingdom while the owners had now the nationality of that kingdom.(1)

Note
1. The Kingdom of Yugoslavia was formed on 1 December 1918 with merging the provisional State of Slovenes, Croats and Serbs (officially proclaimed on 29 October 1918) with the formerly independent Kingdom of Serbia. The latter kingdom was since 28 November 1918 united with the Kingdom of Montenegro. The Kingdom of Yugoslavia was until 3 October 1929 officially titled the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes.

Source
Reports of International Arbitral Awards. Navigation on the Danube, 2 August 1921, volume 1. UN, 2006.

Monday, 10 December 2018

Luxembourg pusher tug (ex-Weredi 1974-1979, Jason 1979-1986, Liberte 1986-2017) Bo Chris Jr 2017-


Inner harbour of Vlissingen, Netherlands 8 December 2018

Luxembourg-flagged, homeport Grevenmacher, ENI 08023091, MMSI 253242276 and call sign LX2276. Ex-Weredi (6000270), Jason (2715536) and Liberte (2317901). Tonnage 48 tons and as dimensions 22,80 x 8,20 x 2,00 metres. Built at Wroclawska, Gdansk, Poland in 1974. Fitted out with 1-868hp Mitsubishi and 1-1.050hp Caterpillar. Ex Weredi of Joos, Braschaat, Belgium, renamed Jason in 1979 of J. Reinierse, Dordrecht, Netherlands, since 1985 of T. Hoogendijk&Zn., Sliedredcht, Netherlands, since 1986 of Ittervoort Internationaal Expeditiebedrijf, Ittervoort, Netherlands, renamed Libere in 1986 of A.M. Bruinsma, Spijkenisse, Netherlands, since 1994 of Bamalité SA, Luxembourg, renamed Bo Chris Jr in 2017 of Bamalité, Grevenmacher, Luxembourg and since 2018 of Nuala Consulting AG, Grevenmacher. 

Russian dry cargo ship Koreiz 1968-1995 (Inas Junior 1995-1999, Sani 1999-2000, Hani 2000-no longer existing)


Russia-flagged, IMO 6912891 and call sign UOVU. Renamed Inas Junior in 1995, Sani in April 1999 and Hani in October 2000. Last Cambodia-flagged. Azov Shipping Company, Zhdanov. Of the Sibirles II/Krymsk-type, project 450B consisting of the Krymsk, Kilya, Krasnoarmeisk, Koreiz, Krasnoturinsk, Kirensk, Katangli and Krasnopolye. Built by Santierul Naval, Galati, Romania in 1968.

Deadweight timber 4.230 tons, deadweight grain 3.860 tons, gross register tonnage 3.172 tons and net register tonnage 1.370 tons. General technical characteristics of the Sibirles I type. Deadweight 3.797 (general cargo)-4.167 tons (timber), deadweight cargo capacity or net deadweight tonnage 3.337 (general cargo)-3.360 (timber) tons, gross register tonnage 3.231 and net register tonnage 1.488 tons. Dimensions 104,40 (over al) x 14,37 (moulded) x 7,12 (depth to man deck) x 22,40 (height mast above main deck) x loaded draught fore 5,92 (general cargo)-6,3 (timber) - mean 6,05 (general cargo)-6,37 (timber) –aft (6,19 general cargo)-6,42 (timber metres and light draught 1,19 (fore)-2,56 (mean)-3,94 (aft) metres. Four holds. Total bale capacity 5.085 and grain 5.433 cubic metres. Speed 13,5 (full loaded)-14,0 (in ballast) knots.

East German tug No. 521 according to a CIA report dated 14 December 1953

An item reported that after 1 May 1953 was added to the fleet of the East German Deutsche Schiffahrts- und Umschlagsbetreibe (DSU) and stationed at DSU-Berlin the open tug with as number 521 and capacity of 288 tons.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, document number CIA-RDP81-01036R000100070044-6

Dutch tug (ex-Uranus 2009-2014) Alp Guard 2014-


Buitenhaven Vlissingen, Netherlands 30 June 2018

Netherlands-flagged, IMO 9398539, MMSI 244830812 and call sign PCYY. Gross tonnage 3.732 ton, deadweight 3.226 ton and dimensions 66,65 (between perpendiculars)-74,36 (over all) x 20,90 x 8,25 (maximum) x 9,50 (depth to main deck) metres. Cargo deck area 315 square metres. DP II Anchor Handling Salvage Tug. Bollard pull 285 (continue)-300 (maximum) tons, Speed 11,8 (service)-16,7 (maximum) knots. Since 1 December 2014 of Alp Guard/Alp Maritime Services B.V., Rotterdam, Netherlands. Former anchor handling vessel Uranus of Harms Bergung Transport&Heavylift, Hamburg, Germany, Liberia-flagged, homeport Monrovia and MMSI 636092459, renamed 1 December 2014. Built by Mutzelfeldtwerft Nord, Cuxhaven, Germany with yard number 280 in 2009.

Yugoslavia seized German tug Mosel according to a list dated 2 August 1921

After the First World War (1914-1918) lost by the German, Austro-Hungarian and Ottoman Empires was Walker D. Hines appointed as international arbitrator responsible for the ceding of tugs and other inland vessels by Germany, Bulgaria, Austria and Hungary to the Allied Powers. For Austria respectively Hungary were the Treaties of St. Germain and Trianon leading. Lists were made of the involved vessels including some details and what their fate was to be.

A list dated Paris, France 2 August 1921 reported that the Serb-Croat-Slovene Kingdom (1) seized the German inland ZTL (2) Bayerische Lloyd tug Mosel with a horsepower of 380 hp.

Notes
1. The Kingdom of Yugoslavia was formed on 1 December 1918 with merging the provisional State of Slovenes, Croats and Serbs (officially proclaimed on 29 October 1918) with the formerly independent Kingdom of Serbia. The latter kingdom was since 28 November 1918 united with the Kingdom of Montenegro. The Kingdom of Yugoslavia was until 3 October 1929 officially titled the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes.
2. ZTL=Navigation Group under supreme army command/war department.

Source
Reports of International Arbitral Awards. Navigation on the Danube, 2 August 1921, volume 1. UN, 2006.

Dutch inland tug (ex-Snip 1929-1994) Elise 1 1994-


Leiden, Netherlands 2 December 2018

Netherlands-flagged, ENI 02321623. Built by Scheepswerf Concordia fa. S. Symonsbergen, Amsterdam, Netherlands in 1929. Dimensions 15,85 x ? x 3,40 x 1,38 metres and a displacement pf 4,7431 cubic metres. Ex-Snip of De Staat der Nederlanden van Waterstaat en Zuiderzeewerken, The Hague, Netherlands, since 18 December 1853 of the N.V. Maatschappij tot Uitvoeren vn Zuiderzeewerken, The Hague, Since 15 January 1966 of N.V. Hollandsche Aannemings Maatschappij (HAM), Rotterdam, Netherlands, since 4 April 1992 of HAM, Rijswijk, renamed Elise I of Slepdienst A.B.S. Elise (J.C. Hazelkamp, Amsterdam) and since 15 April 2013 of F.R. van Kampenhout, Oestgeest, Netherlands. 

GD tug Leontine became Yugoslavian according to a list dated 2 August 1921

After the First World War (1914-1918) lost by the German, Austro-Hungarian and Ottoman Empires was Walker D. Hines appointed as international arbitrator responsible for the ceding of tugs and other inland vessels by Germany, Bulgaria, Austria and Hungary to the Allied Powers. For Austria respectively Hungary were the Treaties of St. Germain and Trianon leading. Lists were made of the involved vessels including some details and what their fate was to be.

A list dated Paris, France 2 August 1921 reported that of the GD tug Leontine with a horsepower of 600hp handed over under the military convention of 13 November 1918 the nationality and ownership was now confirmed to be the Serb-Croat-Slovene-Kingdom.(1)

Note
1. The Kingdom of Yugoslavia was formed on 1 December 1918 with merging the provisional State of Slovenes, Croats and Serbs (officially proclaimed on 29 October 1918) with the formerly independent Kingdom of Serbia. The latter kingdom was since 28 November 1918 united with the Kingdom of Montenegro. The Kingdom of Yugoslavia was until 3 October 1929 officially titled the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes.

Source
Reports of International Arbitral Awards. Navigation on the Danube, 2 August 1921, volume 1. UN, 2006.

Maltese fishing vessel VLT MFB 8170

Marsaxlokk Harbour, Malta 14 May 2018

Dutch warship Domburg 1666-1673

Of the admiralty Zealand, mentioned between 1666-1673, dimensions 142 x ? x ? and an armament of 56-60 guns. 

Dutch bomb (galliot) 1695-1697

Of the admiralty Maze, built in 1695, sold in 1697, dimensions 90 x 24 x 10½ and an armament of 8 guns. 

Maltese fishing vessel VLT MFC-145

Marsaxlokk Harbour, Malta 14 May 2018

Dutch transport ’t Dorp van Brakel 1688

Of the admiralty Maze, hired for ƒ 750 at Rotterdam, Netherlands to bring king-stadholder William III to England in October 1688, dimensions 84 x 21 x 11 feet, master Albert van der Mij, appraised value of ship ƒ 4.800. 

Maltese fishing vessel VLT MFA.55

Marsaxlokk Harbour, Malta 14 May 2018

Dutch transport Dorp Besoijnen 1688

Of the admiralty Amsterdam, pinnace ship, hired for ƒ 1.025 at Amsterdam, Netherlands as part of the fleet which brought king-stadtholder Willem III to England in 1688, master Cornelis Lieuwsz, appraised value of ship ƒ 6.625. 

Maltese fishing vessel VLT MFA 259

Marsaxlokk Harbour, Malta 14 May 2018

Dutch warship Maagd van Dordrecht and Dordrecht 1652

Of the admiralty Maze, seized by English in 1652, dimensions 106 x 25 x 10 feet, an armament of 26 guns and a crew numbering 60 men. 

Dutch war ship Grauwe Valk 1573

Fitted out at Amsterdam, Netherlands to be added to the Spanish fleet in 1573. 

Maltese fishing vessel VLT MFA 97

Marsaxlokk Harbour, Malta 14 May 2018

Whereabouts of Hungarian inland Mohacs tug II Lajos unknown according to a list dated 2 August 1921

After the First World War (1914-1918) lost by the German, Austro-Hungarian and Ottoman Empires was Walker D. Hines appointed as international arbitrator responsible for the ceding of tugs and other inland vessels by Germany, Bulgaria, Austria and Hungary to the Allied Powers. For Austria respectively Hungary were the Treaties of St. Germain and Trianon leading. Lists were made of the involved vessels including some details and what their fate was to be.

A list dated Paris, France 2 August 1921 reported that the Hungarian inland Mohacs tug II Lajos with a horsepower of 120 hp was missing but that neither France, Romania or the Serb-Croat-Slovene Kingdom claimed to have seized her.

Source
Reports of International Arbitral Awards. Navigation on the Danube, 2 August 1921, volume 1. UN, 2006.

Sunday, 9 December 2018

French patrol vessel Pluvier (P678) 1995-

Zeebruge, Belgium, 30 June 2018

France-flagged and MMSI 227801100. Of the Flamant OPV 64-class consisting of the Flamant, Pluvier and Cormoran. Laid down at CMN Cherbourg, France in  1995, launched on 2 December 1996 and commissioned on 18 December 1997. Displacement 374 tons (full load) tons and as dimensions 54,18 x 10 x 2,2 metres or 179.8 x 32.8 x 7.2 feet. Speed 22-23 knots and a range of 4.500 nautical miles with a speed of 12 knots. Crew numbers 19-20 men. Armament consists of 2-x1-12,7mm machineguns.

British battleship HMS Agamemnon completed trials according to the magazine Mitteilungen aus dem Gebiete des Seewesens dated 1907 No. 11

Lord Nelson-class

An item reported that the British battleships HMS Agamemnon completed in the last week of August her trials and achieved with full horse power of 17.285 ihp/130 rpm and a coal consumption pg 0,96 kilo/ihp/hour a speed of 18.752 knots. That’s was 4/5 knots and 535ihp more than expected.(1)

Note
1. Building ordered in 1904. Laid down by the William Beardmore and Company’s Daimuir Naval Construction Works, Daimuir, Scotland on 15 May 1905, launched on 23 June 1906, completed on June 1908, commissioned on 25 June 1908, decommissioned on 20 March 1909, converted into a target ship at the Chatham Dockyard between 6 December 1920-8 April 1921, radio-controlled target ship between 1923-1926 and then replaced by HMS Centurion and finally sold to J. Cashmore, Newport, England to be broken up on 24 January 1927. On 1 March she left the Portsmouth Dockyard to her final destination at Newport. Her building was seriously delayed caused by problems with the shipyard personnel and using her guns for the HMS Dreadnought. Of the Lord Nelson-class consisting of the Lord Nelson and Agamemnon, preceded by Swiftsure-class and succeeded ny HMS Dreadnought. 

Polish mine countermeasures vessel ORP Kormoran (601) 2014-


Zeebrugge, Belgium 30 June 2018

Poland-flagged, MMSI 261528000 and call sign SQWK. Of the Kormoran II Classs MCVMs. Laid down by Remontowa Shipbuilding yard, Gdansk, Poland on 23 September 2014, launched on 4 September 2015 and commissioned on 29 November 2017. Displacement 830 (standard) tons and as dimensions 55,58 (between perpendiculars)-58,5 (hull made of austenic steel so she is non-magnetic) x 9,75 (waterline)-10,3 x 6,4 (height) metres. Machinery consists of 2x1.360hp/1.000kW MTU 8V369TE74L diesel engines and 2 Cyclorotors allowing a speed of 15 knots. Range more as 2.500 nautical miles. Crew numbers 45 men. Armament 1x2-2,3cm and2x1-12,77mm/0.50” machineguns.