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Sunday, 25 September 2016

German bulk carrier (ex-Glorious Future 1994-1999, Aliacmon River 1999-2005, Theotokos 2005-2006) Barbara 2006-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 10 September 2016

Liberia-flagged, homeport Monrovia, Liberia, IMO 9066760, MMSI 636092335 and call sign D5AO6. Built by IHI Achi Works, Chita, Japan in 1994. Owned by Mineralien Schiffahrt Spedition&Transport, Schnaittenbach, Germany. Ex-Glorious Future renamed April 1999, Aliacmon River renamed June 2005 and Theotokos renamed November 2006.

Danish general cargo ship (ex-Wilma Frank 1966-1972, Douro Star 1982-1985, Wilma Frank 1982, Dorca 1982-1989) Saturn 1989-


Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 16 September 2016

Denmark-flagged, homeport, Noerresundby, IMO 6604690, MMSI 219000245 and call sign OUHO2. Built by Vooruitgang Scheepswerf, Hoogezand, Netherlands in 1966. Owned and managed by Norresundby Shipping, Aalborg, Denmark. Ex-Wilma Frank renamed 1972, Douro Star renamed 5 November 1982, Wilma Frank renamed 5 November 1982 and Dorca renamed 20 July 1989.

German general cargo ship Suntis 1985-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 16 September 2016

Germany-flagged, homeport Munstrdor/Itzehoe, IMO 8513314, MMSI 218005000 and call sign DUXS. Built by Peters Schffswerft, Wewelsfleth, Germany in 1985. Owned and managed by Warnecke Luise&Uw, Heiligenstedten, Germany.

Danish oil/chemical tanker (ex-Emilia Theresa 1998-2002) Bitten Theresa 2002-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 16 September 2016

Malta-flagged, homeport Valletta, IMO 9165451, MMSI 248373000 and call sign 9HA2337. Ex-Emilia Theresa renamed September 2002. Built by Tuzla Shipbuilding Industry, Istanbul, Turkey in 1998. Owned and managed by Herning Shipping, Herning. Denmark.

Danish oil/chemical tanker Baltic Swift 2010-

Schelde off Vlissingen, 16 September 2016

Malta-flagged, homeport Valletta, Malta, IMO 9464376, MMSI 229879000 and call sign 9HA3688. Other sources claiming Cyprus-flagged, homeport Limassol, Cyprus and MMSI 212132000. Owned and managed by Norient Product Pool, Hellerup, Denmark. Built at the Hyundai Mipo Dockyard, Ulsan, South Korea in 2010.

England sending warships towards Tangier, Morocco according to the Dutch newspaper Soerabaijasch handelsblad dated 7 June 1904

An item dated London, England 7th reported that the British battleship Prince of Wales (1) would depart the next morning to Tangier, Morocco and a cruiser and 7 other battleships would depart any moment from Gibraltar with the same destination.(2)

Notes
1. Of the Formidable-class, laid down at the Chatham Dockyard on 20 March 1901, launched on 25 March 1903, commissioned on 18 May 1904 and sold to be broken up on 12 April 1920.
2. As a result of the First Moroccan Crisis ot Tangier Crisis March 1905-May 1906 dealing with the status Morocco, with Germany supporting the sovereignty of the Moroccan sultan Abdelaziz against France and United Kingdom.

Japan ordering in the USA steel for her battleships according to the Dutch newspaper Soerabaijasch handelsblad dated 9 September 1904

An item dated London, England 9th reported that the Japanese cabinet ordered in the USA the livery of 75 on nickel steel plates of the best quality needed for her battleships.

French dockworkers still striking at Marseille, France according to the Dutch newspaper Soerabaijasch handelsblad dated 9 September 1904

An item reported that at Marseille, France the harbour workers were working again, but the dockworkers still striking demanding that the agreement of 1903 was still leading.

British Royal Navy intended to condemn large number of ships according to the Dutch newspaper De Sumatra Post dated 19 December 1904

An item dated London, England 14th reported that due to a reorganisation within the British Royal navy 3 battleships, 30 cruisers and 17 gunboats which were useless were to be condemned for naval duties.

Japanese Sea filled with sea mines according to the Dutch newspaper Soerabaijasch handelsblad dated 7 November 1904

An item reported that according to the steamship Formosa which arrived at Marseille, France she off Shanghai, China nearly struck a sea mine. Her master stated that the Japanese Sea was filled with dangerous mines. Further more was chased and stopped by 3 Japanese cruisers who investigated his cargo. Her complained at the consul at Port Said, Egypt about this investigation.(1)

Note
1. The Russo-Japanese war between 8 February 1904-5 September 1905.

Russian steamship Jaralsaw underway for bunkering Russian Baltic Fleet according to the Dutch newspaper Soerabaijasch handelsblad dated 7 November 1904

An item dated London, England 7th reported that the Russian steamship Jaralsaw of the Voluntary Fleet loaded with coal and water passed the Bosporus to join the Russian Baltic Fleet which was underway towards the Far East.(1)

Note
1. The Russo-Japanese war between 8 February 1904-5 September 1905.

Russian destroyers arrived at Algiers, Algeria according to the Dutch newspaper Soerabaijasch handelsblad dated 2 November 1904

An item reported the arrival of 3 Russian destroyers [of the Baltic Fleet underway towards the Far East] arrived at Algiers, Algeria coming from Tangier, Morocco.(1)

Note
1. The Russo-Japanese war between 8 February 1904-5 September 1905.

German and British colliers underway for bunkering Russian Baltic Fleet according to the Dutch newspaper Soerabaijasch handelsblad dated 2 November 1904

An item referred to tidings received from Las Palmas, Canary islands that 4 German colliers loaded coal for the Russian Baltic Fleet [underway towards the Far East] departed towards Cameroon and 3 British steamships also loaded with coal towards Réunion.(1)

Note
1. The Russo-Japanese war between 8 February 1904-5 September 1905.

Location of Russian Baltic Fleet unknown to Russian admiralty according to the Dutch newspaper Soerabaijasch handelsblad dated 27 October 1904

An item reported that the Russian admiralty had no idea of the position of her Baltic Fleet underway towards the Far East.(1) Communication efforts failed until now. A second item reported that 4 of the battleships arrived at Vigo, Spain. The others were still underway.

Note
1. The Russo-Japanese war between 8 February 1904-5 September 1905.

American squadron underway from Guam towards the Philippines according to the Dutch newspaper Bataviaasch nieuwsblad dated 1 February 1904

An item dated Tokyo, Japan 13th reported that an American squadron consisting of 3 battleships and 4 cruisers left Guam, Ladrones Islands ]=Mariana Islands] towards Manila, Philippines.(

Saturday, 24 September 2016

Dutch submarine Hr. Ms. (ex-KXXI) O-21 1937-1957


Became the most successful Dutch submarine during the Second World War. Originally to be named K XXI. Sister ships O22-27. Design of the Royal Netherlands Navy. Supervisor during building was naval chief engineer G. de Rooij. Contract signed on 10/19 June 1937, ordered on 12 April 1937, to be delivered on 10 December 1939, 580 ton steel no. 52 à 203,65 per ton ordered on 3 February 1937, laid down in shed II on the island shipyard of the Kon. Mij. De Schelde, Vlissingen, Netherlands with yard number 207 on 13 July 1938, machinery placed between 8 May-28 September 1939, launched by Mrs. M.W. Kwak-Bout on at 13.15 o’clock 21 October 1939, docked 9-27 December 1939 and 10-12 April 1940, trials while berthed 30 November and 1 December 1939, technical trial 9 January-10 March 1940, torpedo testing off Den Helder, Netherlands 5-20 March 1940, delivered on 12 May 1940, left 12 May 1940 the locks at Vlissingen bound for England under own power, there finished at Rosyth, Scotland and ready on 22 June 1940, de commissioned on 2 November 1957 and sold to the firm G.P. van Beckum, Alkmaar, Netherlands to be broken up on 24 January 1958.

Dimensions 77,70 (over all) x 6,20-6,55 x 5.851 (hold at thrush no. 70) x 3,940 metres. Draught at launching with a displacement of 836 tons was 3,01 (fore)-3,63 (aft) metres. Displacement 974/990 (surfaced)-1.186/1.208,5 (submerged ) tons. Standard displacement 889,47 tons. Speed 19,5 (surfaced)-9 (submerged) knots. Three screws. Two-7 cylinder Sulzer Diesel engines supplying at 450 rpm totally 5.300 ahp. 70% was welded instead of riveted.

German light cruiser SMS (ex-Ersatz Ariadne) Dresden


Of the Cöln-class consisting of the completed Cöln and Dresden, the launched but never completed Wiesbaden, Magdeburg, Leipzig, Rostock and Frauenlob and the 3 Ersatz Cöln, Ersatz Emden and Ersatz Karlsruhe laid down down but never completed. Preceded by the Königsberg-class. Building ordered under the contract name Ersatz Ariadne. Laid down at Blohm und Voss, Hamburg, Germany with yard number 601in 1916, launched on 25 April 1917, commissioned on 28 March 1919, scuttled by her own crew at Scapa Flow, Orkney Isles on 21 June 1919and her wrecks till remains thee.

Displacement 5.629 (design)-7.486 (full load) tons and as dimensions 155,5 (0ver all) x 14,2 x 6,01 metres or 510 x 47 x 19.7 feet. The two sets of steam turbines and 8 coal fired and six oil fired Marine-type boilers supplied via 2 shafts 31.000 allowing a maximum speed of 27,5 knots and with a speed of 12 knots a range of around 6.000 nautical miles. Her crew numbered 559 men included 17 officers. The armour consisted of an (amidships) 6cm/2.4” thick belt, a 6cm/2.4” thick deck and the conning tower protected by 10cm/3.9“ thick armour. The armament consisted of 8x1-15cm/5,91” L/45 quick firing guns, 3x8,8cm3.5” L/45 anti aircraft guns and 4-6ocm/24” torpedo tubes and she could carry 200 mines with her.

French navy in excellent condition according to minister of navy Pelltan according to the Dutch newspaper Nieuwe Tilburgsche Courant dated 25 February 1904

Victor Hugo

An item dated Paris, France 24th reported that in a meeting of the French naval commissioned the minister of navy Pellestan (1) supplied extensively and satisfying details about the French naval strength. Although he saw none conflict in advance needed France to prepared for any event. The fleet was in excellent condition and now strengthened with armoured cruisers of which performances the navy had huge expectations.(2)  Just like the British Royal Navy possessed France 5 armoured cruisers of a modern type and within short time were another 5 of the same type to be armed. Considered the Far East (3) was it impossible that the French maintained there a squadron equal to the Americans, British and Japanese. However four French destroyers would depart to strengthen the French naval force in the Far East.

Notes
1. Charles Camille Pellet an (28 June 1846 Paris, France-4 June 1915), minister of navy 7 June 1902-24 January 1905, (radical) Republican politician and journalist.
2. The Léon Gambetta-class consisting of the Léon Gambetta, Jules Ferry and Victor Hugo. Further more the Jules Michelet, Ernst Renan and the Edgar Quintet-class consisting of the Edgar Quintet and Waldeck-Rousseau.
3. The Russo-Japanese war between 8 February 1904-5 September 1905.

Italian shipyard Ansaldo building torpedo boats for Turkish navy according to the Dutch newspaper Nieuwe Tilburgsche Courant dated 25 February 1904

An item dated Pera 24th reported that the Turkish navy a day earlier a contract signed for the building of 7 torpedo boats by Ansaldo, Genoa, Italy to be delivered within a year.

Russian gunboat Mandsjoer permitted to seek shelter at Shanghai, China according to the Dutch newspaper Nieuwe Tilburgsche Courant dated 25 February 1904

An item dated Shangahi, China 24th reported that the Russian consul and the commanding officer of the Russian gunboat there an official telegram received reporting that in the night before the Japanese without success Port Arthur attacked.(1) Six ships were to be lost although no one could tell of which nationality. The Chinese department of foreign affairs seemed to have given the Russian gunboat Mandsjoer permission to stay at Shanghai under condition that she was to be armed and her fireplaces cold. The Japanese cruiser lying at Woesoeng left same day to the north.

Note
1. The Russo-Japanese war between 8 February 1904-5 September 1905.

Unsuccessful Japanese attack on Russian fleet at Port Arthur. China according to the Dutch newspaper Nieuwe Tilburgsche Courant dated 25 February 1904

Retsivan

An item dated St. Petersburg, Russia 24th reported that the Japanese attacked without success Port Arthur, loosing 4 battleships and 2 transports.(1) The Russian battleship Retvisan (2) performed extra ordinary. A second dated Paris, France 24th confirmed the unsuccessful Japanese attack and the loss of 4 ships.

Notes
1. The Russo-Japanese war between 8 February 1904-5 September 1905.
2. Battleship. Building at the shipyard of William Cramp&Sons, Philadelphia, USA was ordered in 2 May 1898, to built her was a modified Potemkin design used, she was with yard number 300 laid down on 29 July 1899, launched on 23 October 1900, commissioned on 23 March 1902, building costs 4.360.000 US dollars, and sunk by the Japanese army howitzers in Port Arthur on 6 December 1904, after the capitulation of the Russian forces on 2 January 1905 was nothing don with her until the Japanese salvaged her on 22 September 1905, renamed Hizen on 24 September 1905, repaired at Sasebo, Japan between 27 November 1905 and November 1908, refitted in 1913, stationed at Vladivostok in 1918, reclassified as 1st coast defence ship on 1 September 1921, disarmed at Sasebo, Japan as result of the Washington Naval Treaty in April 1922, stricken on 20 September 1923 and finally sunk in the Bungo channel while used as a target on 25 July 1924.

Unsuccessful Japanese attack on Russian fleet at Port Arthur. China according to the Dutch newspaper Nieuwe Tilburgsche Courant dated 25 February 1904

An item dated St. Petersburg, Russia 24th reported that the Japanese tried to smuggle 4 steamboats loaded with flammable and explosive substances into the harbour of Port Arthur. The Russian fleet lying there was however attentive and prevented that the steamboats could damage anything. Two were destroyed, the other 2 stranded and of the escorting torpedo boats were also 2 destroyed.(1)

Note
1. The Russo-Japanese war between 8 February 1904-5 September 1905.

Japanese warships passing Wei Hai Wei, China according to the Dutch newspaper Nieuwe Tilburgsche Courant dated 25 February 1904

An item dated Wei Hai Wei, China 24th reported that the same day four Japanese battleships and 9 cruisers passed going eastwards.(1)

Note
1. The Russo-Japanese war between 8 February 1904-5 September 1905.

Unsuccessful Japanese attack on Russian fleet at Port Arthur. China according to the Dutch newspaper Soerabaijasch handelsblad dated 10 February 1904

An item dated The Hague, Netherlands 9th reported that some Japanese torpedo boats attacked (1) Russian battleships lying off Port Arthur (2) and of which three were damaged.

Notes
1. The Russo-Japanese war between 8 February 1904-5 September 1905.
2. Port Arthur nowadays Lüshin City or Lüshunkou, China was leased by the Russian empire since 1897.

Friday, 23 September 2016

Dutch screw steamship 1st class Zr. Ms. Adolf Hertog van Nassau returned from Portugal at Texel, Netherlands according to the Dutch newspaper Nederlandsche staatscourant 7 July 1866

Model NG-MC-1144 Rijksmuseum Amsterdam Netherlands. Original link

An item reported that the Dutch steam frigate Zr. Ms. Adolf Hertog van Nassau rear admiral O.A. Uhlenbeck coming from Lisbon, Portugal arrived in the evening of the 5th in the roads of Texel.(1)

Note
1. Screw steamship 1st class, call sign GQBL, on stocks at the navy yard at Vlissingen, Netherlands on 4 December 1858, launched on Saturday 14.00 o’clock 8 June 1861, guard ship at Willemsoord, Netherlands since 1 October 1877, decommissioned on 27 February 1918, used as accommodation for the army, sold to the city of Den Helder, Netherlands in February 1919 with the intention to be broken up for her timber which was as fuel then distributed to the population, in March 1919 were unemployed busy with breaking her up. Wood-built. Displacement 3.750 tons, dimensions 62,36 (between perpendiculars)-72,86 (over all) x 15,72 x 6,80 metres, horsepower 450 hp, 3 masts, 1 funnel and a crew numbering500 men. Armament 51 guns and as guard ship 6-12cm K.A. guns.

Dutch brig 1st class Zr. Ms. Cachelot served at guard ship at Macassar, Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Nederlandsche staatscourant 7 July 1866

Rijksmuseum Amsterdam, Netherlands. Original url

An item referred to tidings dated 14th May 1866 dealing with the movements of the Dutch squadron in the Dutch East Indies reported that the Dutch brig Zr. Ms. Cachelot captain J.W. de Ruyter de Wildt served as guard ship in the roads of Macassar, Dutch East Indies.(1)

Note
1. Brig 1st class, call sign GQCF, on stocks at navy yard at Vlissingen, Netherlands by A.E. Tromp on 4 September 1844, launched Saturday 28 June 1851, transferred to the Indies Military Navy 1 January 1868, condemned and sold on a public auction at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies for ƒ 8.000 to Mr. Nicolaï on 4 February 1871, dimensions 30,50 (load line between perpendiculars) x 9,50 (inner hull) x 4,0 (fore)-4,3 (aft) x 4,71 (hold) metres, 499,5 tons displacement and an armament of 10-12 (30 pd grenade guns).

Dutch corvette 1st class Zr. Ms. Juno served as guard ship at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Nederlandsche staatscourant 7 July 1866

Model (NG-MC-345) Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, Netherlands. original link

An item referred to tidings dated 14th May 1866 dealing with the movements of the Dutch squadron in the Dutch East Indies reported that the Dutch corvette Zr. Ms. Juno captain J.J. Westerouen van Meeteren served as guard ship in the roads of Surabaya, Dutch East Indies.(1)

Note
1. corvette 1st class, call sign GQLJ, on stocks at the navy yard at Rotterdam, Netherlands by P. Glavimans Jz. on 20 June 1833, launched 14 May 1839, docked at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands 29 March-17 April 1841, part of the Indies Military Navy since1 January 1868, guard ship at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies 18 September 1867-25 January 1870, sold at Surabaya on a public auction to the native Aridin for ƒ 16.700,00 on 2 July, dimensions 39,50 (loadline) x 10,50 (inner hull) x 4,4 (fore)-5,0 9aft) x 5,6 (hold below maindeck) metres, 929 tons displacement, 22 (1869: 14 medium 30pd guns)-32 (24-12pd guns, 8-30pd carronades, 4-8pd guns) guns and a crew numbering 120 (1869) men.

Dutch tug Albert I sunk according to the Dutch newspaper Leeuwarder nieuwsblad dated 30 April 1940

An item dated Urk, Netherlands 2nd reported that the Dutch tug Albert I underway from Genemuiden, Netherlands towards Urk where she served in the land reclamation project sunk on yesterday afternoon just before the harbour entrance despite all efforts done by her crew to keep her floating. Her crew was saved.

German torpedo boat G173 fitted out with Zoelly turbines according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1910-1911 no. 5

An item referred to the Mitteilungen reporting that the at Germaniawerft built German torpedo boat G173 achieved during 2 double runs a medium maximum speed of 32,919 miles. She was the first warship fitted out with Zoelly turbines.

German torpedo boat S166 fastest of her kind according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1910-1911 no. 5

An item referred to the Mitteilungen reporting that the at Schichau built German torpedo boat S166 achieved during some time a maximum speed of 36,3 miles which was the fastest ever and a medium speed during all runs of 35,93 miles. The G171 had been until then the fastest with a maximum speed of 34,72 miles.

British annual gunnery practices with targets further improved according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1910-1911 no. 5

An item reported that the annual target gunnery practices of the Royal British navy was to extended with how to act with defect or failing parts of fire control devices. The diameter of the target of was 9,27 metres again and the weather condition would be considered while awarding points.

Australian destroyers Yarra, Paramatta and Warrego built in England according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1910-1911 no. 5

An item reported that the destroyer Yarra was launched at Dumbarton. The crews for her and the Parramatta already left Australia. Each crew consisted of 1 lieutenant, 1 midshipmen, 1 constable, 1 gunner, 7 petty officers and 50 sailors. The British Admiralty would be asked to increase this crew. The Warrego was to be disassembled, transported to Australia and there to be assembled.(1)

Note
1. All 3 were part of the River class destroyers consisting of the Yarra, Huon, Paramatta, Swan, Torrens and Warrego, during the First World War forming he Australian Destroyer Flotilla. Displacement 700 tons and as dimensions 245’ x 23.3’x 8.6’, a speed of 26 knots and an armament of 1-4” quick firing gun, 3-12pd quick firing guns and 3-18” torpedo tubes.

German squadron visiting Karlskronan, Sweden according to the Dutch newspaper Het Centrum dated 26 July 1923

An item dated Stockholm, Sweden 25th reported the visit of a German squadron consisting of a battleship, a cruiser and 11 torpedo boats at the Swedish harbour Karlskrona.

British Royal Navy building new 35.000 tons battleships according to the Dutch newspaper Bataviaasch nieuwsblad dated 4 January 1937

King George V-class

An item dated London, England 2nd referred to the naval correspondent of the Daily Telegraph who pointed out that except for the fact that a day earlier the keels were laid down of the battleships Kong George V and Prince of Wales in 1938 another 2-35.000 ton battleships were to be laid down. All four ships were to be completed within 3 years which was 1,5 year shorter as the building of the battleships Nelson and Rodney. Their speed was estimated to be 30 miles.(1)

Note
1. King George V-class consisted of the King George V, Prince of Wales, Duke of York, Howe and Anson, preceded by the Nelson-class and succeeded by the Vanguard and by the never realized Lion-class. In 1928 was started designing this class regarded the limitations of the Washington Naval Treaty of 1922 which allowed non building of battleships until 1931. The design-process was for a second time halted due to the London Naval Treaty of 1930 which continued the building stop until 1937/ In 1935 started the Royal British navy again the designing process based on what already was achieved. The Treaty limited the displacement to a maximum of 35.000 tons and further more was the calibre of the main armament discussed. The choice was 14-16” with a first choice for 15” guns, However in October that same year it was decided that the calibre was to be 10-14” guns instead of 15”, a decision heavily protested by First Lord of Admiralty in 1935 Winston Churchill.

Thursday, 22 September 2016

Dutch bucket dredger Marokko 1952-

Model Nationaal Baggermuseum Sliedrecht, Netherlands

Built by Arnhem Shipbuilding Company Ltd., Arnhem, Netherlands with yard number 353 for Hollandsch Aannemersbedrijf Zanen Verstoep N.V., The Hague, Netherlands in 1952. Bucket capacity 700 litres. Dimensions 50,00 x 9,30 x 3,50 metres. Drediging depth 16-20 extended) metres. Broken up.

British bucket dredger Foremost Prince 1933-1971 (Milutinovic 1971-1981)

Model Nationaal Baggermuseum Sliedrecht, Netherlands

Built at Blyth Dry Docks&Shipbuilding Co. Ltd, in England in 1933, sold to Milutinovic, Yugoslavia as Bag 5 Bore in 1981 and broken up in 1981. Two steam Aitchison Blair 1.000 ihp engines. Bucket capacity 600 litres/0,60 cubic metres, dredging depth 12,81-15,86 (extended) metres. Owned by Westminster Dredging Company Limited and managed by Koninklijke Boskalis Westminster NV, Netherlands. Dimensions pontoon 56,43 (between perpendiculars)-59,48 (over all) x 11,84 x 3,81 (loaded) x 4,88 (depth) metres.

Stranded American battleship Rhode Island refloated according to the Dutch newspaper Het nieuws van den dag voor Nederlandsch-Indië dated 8 May 1906


An item dated New York, USA 7th reported that the stranded American battleship Rhode Island was refloated again.(1)

Note
1. Of the Virginia-class with as sister ships the Virginia, Nebraska, Georgia and New Jersey. Ordered by Act dated 7 June 1900, laid down at the Quincy, Fore River, Massachusetts 1 May 1902, launched 17 May 1904, commissioned 19 February 1906, decommissioned 30 June 1920 and sold in November 1923 to be broken up.

American battleship Rhode Island was stranded according to the Dutch newspaper Het nieuws van den dag voor Nederlandsch-Indië dated 7 May 1905


An item dated New York, USA 6th reported that the new 15.000 ton American battleship Rhode Island (1) was stranded in the Chesapeake Bay near Baltimore, USA. All efforts despite were tugs still not able to refloat her.

Note
1. Of the Virginia-class with as sister ships the Virginia, Nebraska, Georgia and New Jersey. Ordered by Act dated 7 June 1900, laid down at the Quincy, Fore River, Massachusetts 1 May 1902, launched 17 May 1904, commissioned 19 February 1906, decommissioned 30 June 1920 and sold in November 1923 to be broken up.

Powder magazine exploded on board of Brazilian armoured turret ship/battleship Aquidaba(n according to the Dutch newspaper Soerabaijasch handelsblad dated 24 January 1906


An item dated London, England 22nd reported that while near Rio de Janeiro the powder magazine of the Brazilian battleship Aquidabar (1)exploded and sunk within 3 minutes. Among the 300 men killed were her commanding officer and 4 rear admirals who accompanied the minister of navy during his inspection journey.

Note
1. Laid down on 18 June 1883 and launched on 17 January 1885 at the British shipyard of Samuda Brothers. On 16 April 1894 sunk after she was torpedoed and two months later salvaged and repaired was she renamed Vinte Quatro de Mayo, in 1897-1898 was she at the German shipyard Vulcan, Stettin and the British Elswick yard rebuilt and rearmed. In 1900 retained she her original name but was again sunk on 22 January 1906 when a powder room exploded.

Powder magazine exploded on board of Brazilian armoured turret ship/battleship Aquidaba(n according to the Dutch newspaper Soerabaijasch handelsblad dated 24 January 1906


An item dated London, England 23rd reported that of the crew of the exploded Brazilian battleship Aquidabar (1) 98 men were rescued and 212 men killed.

Note
1. Laid down on 18 June 1883 and launched on 17 January 1885 at the British shipyard of Samuda Brothers. On 16 April 1894 sunk after she was torpedoed and two months later salvaged and repaired was she renamed Vinte Quatro de Mayo, in 1897-1898 was she at the German shipyard Vulcan, Stettin and the British Elswick yard rebuilt and rearmed. In 1900 retained she her original name but was again sunk on 22 January 1906 when a powder room exploded.

Still hope for salvaging stranded British battleship Montague for sale according to the Dutch newspaper Het nieuws van den dag voor Nederlandsch-Indië dated 13 June 1906

Duncan-class

An item dated London, England 12th reported that the British deputy secretary for navy Robertson (1) the House of Commons informed that there was still hope to salvage the stranded battleship Montague (2) if the good weather conditions continued.

Notes
1. Edmund Robertson, 1st Baron Lochee (28 October 1845-13 September 1911), parliamentary and financial secretary to the Admiralty 1982-1895 and 12 December 1905-12 April 1908. Liberal politician, barrister and academic.
2. Of the Duncan-class, laid down at the Devonport Dockyard on 23 November 1899, launched on 5 March 1901, commissioned on 28 July 1903 and wrecked on 30 May 1905 on Lundy Island. In 1907 was started with breaking her up.

Guns of stranded British battleship Montague salvaged according to the Dutch newspaper Het nieuws van den dag voor Nederlandsch-Indië dated 3 October 1906

Duncan-class

An item dated London, England 1st reported that the efforts to salvage the guns of the stranded British battleship Montague were successful.(1)

Note
1. Of the Duncan-class, laid down at the Devonport Dockyard on 23 November 1899, launched on 5 March 1901, commissioned on 28 July 1903 and wrecked on 30 May 1905 on Lundy Island. In 1907 was started with breaking her up.

Stranded British battleship Montague for sale according to the Dutch newspaper Het nieuws van den dag voor Nederlandsch-Indië dated 8 August 1906

Duncan-class

An item dated London, England 6th reported that wreck of the stranded British battleship Montague was to be sold on a public auction.(1)

Note
1. Of the Duncan-class, laid down at the Devonport Dockyard on 23 November 1899, launched on 5 March 1901, commissioned on 28 July 1903 and wrecked on 30 May 1905 on Lundy Island. In 1907 was started with breaking her up.

Stranded British battleship Montague probably not to be salvaged according to the Dutch newspaper Het nieuws van den dag voor Nederlandsch-Indië dated 2 June 1906

Duncan-class

An item dated London, England 1st reported that experts feared that when new efforts were done to refloat the stranded British battleship Montague (1) she would sink in 30 fathoms deep water.

Note
1. Of the Duncan-class, laid down at the Devonport Dockyard on 23 November 1899, launched on 5 March 1901, commissioned on 28 July 1903 and wrecked on 30 May 1905 on Lundy Island. In 1907 was started with breaking her up.

British battleship Montagu stranded according to the Dutch newspaper Het nieuws van den dag voor Nederlandsch-Indië dated 31 June 1906

Duncan-class

An item dated London, England 30th reported that the British 14.000 tons battleship Montagu (1) was stranded in the Channel of Bristol. She lost both screws and had heavy inclination. It was doubted if it was possible to refloat her. Several compartments including the fireplaces were filled with water. Her crew was saved although some men were wounded.

Note
1. Of the Duncan-class, laid down at the Devonport Dockyard on 23 November 1899, launched on 5 March 1901, commissioned on 28 July 1903 and wrecked on 30 May 1905 on Lundy Island. In 1907 was started with breaking her up.

Collision between British torpedo boats Nos. 108 and 81 according to the Dutch newspaper Het nieuws van den dag voor Nederlandsch-Indië dated 31 June 1906

An item dated London, England 30th reported that the British torpedo boats Nos. 108 and 81 collided in the Channel damaging both boats heavily.

British battleships Resolution and Ramillies collided according to the Dutch newspaper Soerabaijasch handelsblad dated 19 June 1906

An item dated London, England 18th reported that during naval manoeuvres the British battleships Resolution (1) and Ramillies (2) collided. The latter ship was with a damaged screw towed towards Chatham, England.

Notes
1. Of the Royal Sovereign-class, laid down by Palmers Shipbuilding and Iron Company, Jarrow, England on 14 June 1890, launched on 28 May 1892, commissioned on 5 December 1893 and sold to be broken up on 2 April 1914.
2. Of the Royal Sovereign-class, laid down by J.&G. Thompson Ltd., Clydebank, Scotland on 17 August 1890, launched on 1 March 1892, commissioned on 17 October 1893 and sold to be broken up in 7 October 1913.

Boiler exploded on board of British battleship Prince of Wales according to the Dutch newspaper Nieuwe Tilburgsche Courant dated 18 April 1906

An item dated Malta 17th reported that during a full power trial on board of the British battleship Prince of Wales (1) a boiler exploded. Three stokers were killed and 4 men wounded. She was expected to arrive at Malta on the 17th.

Note
1. Of the Formidable-class, laid down at the Chatham Dockyard on 20 March 1901, launched on 25 March 1903, commissioned on 18 May 1904 and sold to be broken up on 12 April 1920.

American battleship Wisconsin ordered to go immediately towards Shanghai, China according to the Dutch newspaper Het nieuws van den dag voor Nederlands-Indië dated 27 March 1906

An item dated Manila, Philippines 25th reported that the American battleship Wisconsin (1) received orders to depart at midnight to join the American fleet at Shanghai, China.

Note
1. Of the Illinois-class, laid down by Union Iron Works on 9 February 1897, launched on 26 November 1898, commissioned on 4 February 1901 and sold to be broken up on 26 January 1922.

Wednesday, 21 September 2016

Dutch tug (ex-Beistadfjord 1944-1952, Jasperina 1952-1943. José 1954-1955, Salland IV 1955-1964, Ja-Fo 1964-1985, Infra 1985-1987, V.H. 75 1987-1997. PAES 4 1997-2012) Content 2012-


Sliedrecht, Netherlands 17 September 2016

Dimensions 17,50 x 4,60 x 1,80 metres and a tonnage 15 tons. ENI no. 02202283. Built at Fikkers, Martenshoek, Netherlands in 1944. In 1944 as Beistadfjord of the German Kriegsmarine at The Hague, Netherlands, in 1947 from the Bureau Herstelbetalingen at The Hague, 1949 of B. Fikkers, Martenshoek, in 1952 as Jasperina of G.E. Bijholt, Groningen, Netherlands, as José in 1954 of C.P. Kriesels, Grevenbicht, Netherlands. as Salland IV in 1955 of Salland Sleepboot Maatschappij NV, Zwolle, Netherlands, as Ja-Fo in 1964 of F. Pons, Almelo, Netherlands, in 1970 of Ja-Fo, Spijkenisse, Netherlands, as Infra in 1985 of F.J. van de Spek, Nieuw-Lekkerlands, Netherlands, as V.H. 75 since 1987 of Van Hasselt Baggermaatschappij BV, Ohe en Laak, Netherlands, as PAES 4 since 1997 of H.W. Paes BV, Stevensweert, Netherlands and since 2012 as Content of W. Leenman, Hardinxveld, Netherlands.

Former Dutch fishing vessel nowadays pleasure craft (ex-De Drie Gebroeders 1961-1973, Jacob Douwe 1973) Nova Cura 1973-


In the locks of Vlissingen, Netherlands 17 September 2016

Netherlands-flagged, MMSI 244780810 and call sign PF5155. Built as fishing vessel for fishing on shrimps and flatfish as the De Drie Gebroeders (DZ82) at Scheepswerf Ton Bodewes, Franeker, Netherlands with yard number F9 in 1961. Shortly afterwards renamed Nova Cura (Z82) with as homeport Zeebrugge, Belgium. Since 2000 used as pleasure craft although parts are still original. Renamed Jacob Douwe (HA82) in 1973 for the sale by a shipbroker, renamed Nova Cure (Z88( in 1973, from C. Rammeloo, Zeebrugge and in 1979 Nova Cura (N88) with as homeport Nieuwpoort, Belgium, Since 1989 again Z88, 9n 1996 N88, laid up in 1999, in 2000 Nova Cura (O738) but no longer use as fishing vessel and since 2002 pleasure craft.

Dutch tug (ex-Smit Bulldog 2009-2015) Sea Bulldog 2015-


Vlissingen, Netherlands 17 September 2016

Netherlands-flagged, IMO 9528299, MMSI 246643000, ENI 9528299/2724117 and call sign PBWD. Gross tonnage 180 tons and as dimensions 25,50 x 10,00 x 2,72 metres. Ex-Smit Buldog of Smit Shipping Singapore Pte. Ldt., Singapore. Built by Damen Shipyard Hardinxveld, Hardinxveld-Giessendam, Netherlands in 2009. In 2015 taken over by Seacontractors BV, Middelburg and owned by Sea Bulldog BV, Middelburg, Netherlands.

The Italian Artigliere-class of destroyers according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1910-1911 no. 5

An item reported that the new Italian destroyers Pontiere and Alpino were part of the Artigliere-class. With the building of ships part of this class was started in 1906 and the original number of 4 was increased to 8 at he moment, namely the Artigliere, Granatiere, Lanciere, Bersagliere, Fuciliere, Carabiniere, Pontiere and Alpino. With a displacement of 375 tons were the dimensions 64,5 x 6,2 x 2 metres. The crew numbered 56 men, speed 29 miles, coal bunker capacity 80 ton and the armament consisted of 4-7,6cm guns en 3 torpedo guns.

Newest German dreadnoughts fitted out with turbine machinery according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1910-1911 no. 5

Siegfriend-class coastal defence ships

Kaiser-class battleships

An item referred to the magazine Army and Naval record reporting that the two newest German dreadnoughts were to be fitted out with turbines. The Heimdal (1) was to be fitted out with 3 screws and a Curtiss turbines and her sister ship with Parsons turbines, both with the same horsepower.

Note
1. Ordered as “U”, laid down at the Kaiserliche Werft Wilhelmshaven with yard number 14 in 1891, launched on 27 July 1892, commissioned on 7 August 1894. De mobilized, crew transferred elsewhere within the navy and barracks ship for submarine crew and coastal defence flotillas on the Ems river since 1915, stricken on 17 June 1919, navy intentions to convert her into a salvage ship cancelled and sold and broken up at Rönnebeck in 1921. Of the Siegfried-class coastal defence consisting of the Siegfried, Beowulf, Frithjof, Heimdall, Hildebrand and Hagen, named after Norse mythological figures. Preceded by the Oldenburg-class and succeeded by the Odin-class. Within short time due the rapid technical evolution was this class outdated and were the Siegfried, Beowulf and Frithjof to be replaced by the Helgoland-class battleships Helgoland, Thüringen and Oldenburg and the Heimdall, Hildebrand and Hagen by the Kaiser (laid down 1909) , Friederich der Grosse (laid down 1910) and Kaiserin (laid down in 1910) of the Kaiser-class battleships. The Kaiser-class was fitted out with turbine machinery.

German battleship Schleswig Holstein modernized according to the Dutch newspaper Het nieuws van den dag voor Nederlandsch-Indië dated 4 February 1926

Deutschland-class

An item dated Berlin, Germany 3th reported that in 1906 launched German battleship Schleswig Holstein and which with such a success participated in the Battle of Jutland was extensively repaired and modernized. She was now commissioned as flagship of the German commander in chief vice admiral Mommsen.

Note
1. Laid down at the Germania Werft under contract name ‘Q’ as the last German pre-dreadnought battleship to be built on 18 August 1905, commissioned on 6 July 1906, modernized in the 1920’s, with her guns firing on Polish positions on 1 September 1939 was the Second World War a fact, sunk by British bombers on 1944, scuttled by her own crew on 21 March 1945, salvaged and beached to be used as a target in 1948 in shallow water off the island of Osmussaar in the Gulf of Finland and apparently nowadays still of her remains are preserved. Of the Deutschland-class consisting of the Deutschland, Hannover, Pommern, Schlesien and Schleswig-Holstein.

Former British ship of the line HMS Impacable to be preserved for eternity according to the Dutch newspaper Het Vaderland dated 2 September 1926

An item dated London, England 2nd reported that the famous old British battleship Implacable (1) was saved from breaking up and arrived safely at Falmouth. She was to be berthed in Carrick Roads near St. Just. Sir Owen Seaman (2) especially mentioned an American navy officer who served during the First World War with the Royal British Navy. He gave 25.000 US dollars, part of the 125.000 until then collected mainly thanks to admiral Beatty.

Notes
1. Launched as the French battleship Duguay-Trouin at Rochefort, France on 24 March 1800, captured on 3 November 1905 by the Royal British Navy but despite heavy protests scuttled on 2 December 1949 for budget reasons.
2. Sir Owen Seaman, 1st Baronet (18 September 186102 February 1936), writer, journalist and poet?
3. David Richard Beatty (17 January 1871 Stapeley, Cheshire, England-12 March 1936 London, England). Dismissed in the rank of Admiral of the Fleet. Commanded the 1st Battle cruiser Squadron 1913-1916 and the Grand Fleet 1916-1918 and First Sea Lord 1 November 1919-30 July 1927.

British battle cruiser HMS Renown preparing to visit Australia and New Zealand in 1927 De Gooi- en Eemlander dated 22 December 1926

An item dated London, England 21th reported that the British battleship Renown would depart on 6 January 1927 towards Australia and New Zealand with on board the duke and duchess of York. Four destroyers and 5 flying boats would escort the ship until Saint Catherine point on the island Wight.(1)

Note
1. Of the Renown-class with as sister ship the Repulse. Original laid down as an improved Revenge-class design but when the First World War broke out was her completion delayed and afterwards completed as battle cruisers. Building ordered on 30 December 1914, laid down at Fairfield, Govan, Scotland on 25 January 1915, launched on 4 March 1916, commissioned on 20 September 1915 and sold on 19 March 1948.

Former German battleship Hessen active as ice breaker according to the Dutch newspaper De Indische courant dated13 January 1926

Braunschweig-class

Hessen as target

An item dated Nauen, Germany 12th reported that the former German battleship Hessen (1) arrived at Reval [nowadays Tallinn, Estonia] and was already preparing the needed measures to free the 25 ships there trapped in the ice. First was an ice free waterway of kilometres length to be created before she could even arrived at the trapped ships.

Note
1. Laid down with the contract name “L” at the Germaniawerft, Kiel with yard number 100 in April 1902, launched by princess Irene von Hessen-Darmstadt on 18 September 1903, commissioned on 19 September 1905,  target in the Baltic Sea in December 1916, decommissioned on 18 January 1917, disarmed and converted into an accommodation for submarine crews at Brunsbüttel, Germany nicknamed SMS Kleinste Fahrt, modernized in 1924, decommissioned on 5 January 1925, replaced by the pocket battleship Admiral Scheer decommissioned on 12 November 1934, converted into a radio-controlled target decommissioned on 1 April 1937, used as target and as icebreaker in the Baltic and North Sea between 1939-1945, ceded to Russia at Libau, Latvia in January 1946, renamed Tsel and finally broken up in 1960. Of the Braunschweig-class consisting of the Braunschweig, Elsass, Hessen, Lotharingen and Preussen. Preceded by the Wittelsbach-class and succeeded by the Deutschland-class.

Dutch tug Lauwerzee with tow Tamara X in the Azores according to the Dutch newspaper Nieuwe Rotterdamsche Courant dated 8 December 1926

An item dated Rotterdam, Netherlands 7th reported that the Dutch tug Lauwerzee arrived a day earlier at Horta, Azores coming from Ponta Delgada, Azores while towing the sailing ship Tamara X.

Dutch tug Oostzee underway from Canary Island towards Rotterdam according to the Dutch newspaper Nieuwe Rotterdamsche Courant dated 8 December 1926

An item dated Rotterdam, Netherlands 7th reported that the Dutch tug Oostzee left that day Las Palmas, Canary islands while towing the coal transporter Rapido towards Rotterdam.

British battleship HMS Ajax underway towards Rosyth, Scotland to be broken up according to the Dutch newspaper Nieuwe Rotterdamsche Courant dated 8 December 1926

King George V-class

An item dated Rotterdam, Netherlands 7th reported that the Dutch tugs Roode Zee and Humber left that same day Portsmouth, England towards Rosyth, Scotland while towing the 23.000 tons battleship Ajax (1) which was to be broken up at Rosyth.

Note
1. Part of the King George V-class consisting of the King George V (ex-Royal George), Audacious, Centurion and Ajax, preceded by the Orion-class and succeeded by the Iron Duke-class. Ordered under the 1910 construction program. Laid down by Scotts Shipbuilding and Engineering Company, Greenock, Scotland on 27 February 1911, launched on 21 March 1912, completed on 31 October 1913, decommissioned in 1924, part of the reserve at Devonport and sold to the Alloa Shipbreaking Company be broken up on 10 December 1926 which started at Rosyth, Scotland from 14 December 1926 on.

Tuesday, 20 September 2016

Dutch fishing vessel (ex-Sola Gratia 2002-2009) Tempus Fugit (ARM-33) 2009-

Tweede Binnenhaven, Vlissingen, Netherlands 17 September 2016

Netherlands-flagged, IMO 8985141, MMSI 245331000 and call sign PBFH. Ex-Sola Gratia renamed November 2009. Built by Padmos Scheepswerf, Stellingdam, Netherlands in 2002.

Dutch euro cutter vessel (ex-Elisabeth 2003-2012) Grietje Cornelia (HD-42) 2012-

Tweede Binnenhaven, Vlissingen, Netherlands 17 September 2016

Netherlands-flagged, MMSI 245795000, registration number NLD200302676 and call sign PBKG. Built by v.d. Werff&Visser, Irnsum, Netherlands with yard number 676 in 2003-2004 as Elisabeth (HD42) for Rederij De Vries BV and renamed Grietje Cornelia in 2012 of Deank Oosterman, both of Den Helder, Netherlands.

Dutch cutter Wilhelmina (YE-78) 1988-

Tweede Binnenhaven, Vlissingen, Netherlands 17 September 2016

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Yerseke, Netherlands. Registration number NLD 198800850 and call sign PIOZ. Built at the shipyard of Kooiman, Zwijndrecht, Netherlands in 1988.

Dutch trailing suction hopper dredger (ex-Banjaard 1983-1992, Breehorn 1992-1993, Fast Wil 1993-1995, Fiducia 1995-1998, Teunie W 1998-2003) Argo 1 2003-

Vlissingen, Netherlands 17 September 2016

IMO 8211617, MMSI 246177000 and call sign PEBK. Ex-Banjaard renamed December 1992, Breehorn renamed May 1993, Fast Wil renamed December 1995, Fiducia renamed December 1998 and Teunie W renamed September 2003. Built 1983 at the shipyard Bijlsma&Zonen, Wartena, Netherlands. Owned and managed by Dranaco, Antwerp, Belgium but Dutch-flagged with as homeport Gouda, Netherlands. Gross tonnage 1.402 tons, summer dead weight 2.284 tons and as dimensions 80 x 11 x 5 metres.
Eerste Binnenhaven, Vlissingen, Netherlands 17 September 2016

British battleship Resolution destined for Egypt according to the Dutch newspaper Algemeen Handelsblad dated 3 June 1926

Revenge-class

An item dated Malta 2nd reported that the British battleship Resolution was ordered to go to Egypt. Other ships were prepared for departure but still received no orders to do.

Note
1. Part of the Revenge-class although often referred to as the Royal Sovereign-class or even ‘R‘-class. There were totally 8 ships planned of which two the Renown and Repulse were built using another design as battle cruisers and the third one the Resistance was cancelled. The 5 sister ships were the Royal Oak, Royal Sovereign, Revenge, Ramillies and Resolution. Preceded by the Queen Elisabeth-class and to be succeeded by the planned but never realized N3 class and the realized Nelson-class. Laid down at Palmers Shipbuilding and Iron Company, Jarrow, England on 29 November 1913, launched on 14 January 1915, commissioned on 30 December 1916, added to the stokers’ training establishment HMS Imperieuse since 1944 and sold to be broken up at Faslane on 5 May 1948. Pennant number 09. Building costs 2.449.680 pound sterling.

Wreck of German battle cruiser Hindenburg sunk again according to the Dutch newspaper Tilburgsche courant dated 28 August 1926


An item dated London, England 26th reported that as a result of the heavy storms the former German battleship Hindenburg which was being salvaged at Scapa Flow again sunk.(1)

Note
1. Battle cruiser. Building ordered under the 1912-1913 Naval Program as a replacement of the protected cruiser Hertha, laid down at the Kaiserliche Werft, Wilhelmshaven, Germany on 1 October 1913, launched on 1 August 1915, commissioned on 10 May 1917, fully operational on 20 October 1917, scuttled by her own crew in Scapa Flow, Orkney Isles, Scotland on 21 June 1919, wreck salvaged on 23 July 1930 and broken up at Rosyth, Scotland between 1930-1932. Part of the Derfflinger-class although with a modified design like improved gun turrets resulting in an increased fire range with 2.5 degrees more elevation (16 degrees).

British battleship HMS Ajax ordered to be broken up according to the Dutch newspaper De Gooi- en Eemlander dated 31 August 1926

King George V-class

Nelson-class

An item reported that the British admiralty ordered that the battleship Ajax (1) was to be broken up under the restrictions of the Washington Naval Treaty. The Ajax launched in 1912, participated in the battle of Jutland, was to be replaced by the Rodney.(2)

Notes
1. Part of the King George V-class consisting of the King George V (ex-Royal George), Audacious, Centurion and Ajax, preceded by the Orion-class and succeeded by the Iron Duke-class. Ordered under the 1910 construction program. Laid down by Scotts Shipbuilding and Engineering Company, Greenock, Scotland on 27 February 1911, launched on 21 March 1912, completed on 31 October 1913, decommissioned in 1924, part of the reserve at Devonport and sold to the Alloa Shipbreaking Company be broken up om 10 December 1926 which started at Rosyth, Scotland from 14 December 1926 on.
2. Of the Nelson-class with as sister ship the HMS Nelson, preceded by the never realized N3-class and the realized Revenge-class and succeeded by the King George V-class. Building ordered in 1922, laid down at Cammell Laird, Birkenhead, England on 28 December 1922, launched on 17 December 1925, sponsored y Princess Mary, completed in August 1927, commissioned on 10 November 1927, involved in the battle with the German battleship Bismarck 26-27 May 1941. decommissioned in 1946, stricken in 1947 and started at Inverkeithing, Scotland her breaking up on 26 March 1948. Building costs 7.617.799 pond sterling. Originally intended to be larger but as result of the Washington Naval Treaty of 1922 was her designed displacement limited to just 35.000 tons.

Former German battle cruiser Hindenburg nearly refloated according to the Dutch newspaper Algemeen Handelsblad dated 26 August 1926


An item reported that the efforts to salvage the former German battleship Hindenburg scuttled in 1919 Scape Flow were until now successful. The main part of the ship was already raised above the water.(1)

Note
1. Battle cruiser. Building ordered under the 1912-1913 Naval Program as a replacement of th protected cruiser Hertha, laid down at the Kaiserliche Werft, Wilhelmshaven, Germany on 1 October 1913, launched on 1 August 1915, commissioned on 10 May 1917, fully operational on 20 October 1917, scuttled by her own crew in Scapa Flow, Orkney Isles, Scotland on 21 June 1919, wreck salvaged on 23 July 1930 and broken up at Rosyth, Scotland between 1930-1932. Part of the Derfflinger-class although with a modified design like improved gun turrets resulting in an increased fire range with 2.5 degrees more elevation (16 degrees).

British battleship Ajax, King George V, Thunderer and Centurion to be stricken according to the Dutch newspaper De Telegraaf dated 15 December 1926

King George V-class

Orion-class

HMS Centurion

Nelson-class

An item dated London, England 15th reported that the British battleships Ajax (1), King George V (2) and Thunderer (3) were to be sold and the Centurion (4) to be used as target. This decision was made under the restrictions under the Washington Naval Treaty. The ships were replaced by the Nelson (5) and Rodney (6) which would enter the service over 6 months. This was the last possible replacement under the treaty until 1934.

Notes
1. Part of the King George V-class consisting of the King George V (ex-Royal George), Audacious, Centurion and Ajax, preceded by the Orion-class and succeeded by the Iron Duke-class. Ordered under the 1910 construction program. Laid down by Scotts Shipbuilding and Engineering Company, Greenock, Scotland on 27 February 1911, launched on 21 March 1912, completed on 31 October 1913, decommissioned in 1924, part of the reserve at Devonport and sold to the Alloa Shipbreaking Company be broken up om 10 December 1926 which started at Rosyth, Scotland from 14 December 1926 on.
2. Part of the King George V-class consisting of the King George V (ex-Royal George), Audacious, Centurion and Ajax, preceded by the Orion-class and succeeded by the Iron Duke-class. Laid down at the navy yard Portsmouth, England on 16 January 1911, launched on9 October 1911, completed in November 1912, decommissioned in 1919, part of the reserve at Devonport, England, gunnery training ship 1923-1926 and broken up in 1926.
3. Her building at the yard of Thames Ironworks and Shipbuilding Company at the mouth of the Bow Creek on the west side at Canning Town as part of the Orion-class was ordered in 1909, laid down on 13 April 1910, launched on 1 February 1911, commissioned in May a year later and decommissioned in 1921 to became a year later a seagoing training ship for cadets and finally paid off in November 1926 in December 1926 and grounded off Blythe on her last voyage to the scrap yard. Building costs were 1,892,823 pound sterling. After her completion was the yard bankrupt!
4. Part of the King George V-class consisting of the King George V (ex-Royal George), Audacious, Centurion and Ajax, preceded by the Orion-class and succeeded by the Iron Duke-class. Laid down at the navy yard Portsmouth, England on 16 January 1911, launched in 18 November 1911, completed in May 1913, converted into a target ship in 1924, ideas to used her as block ship in the harbour of Tripoli, Libya declined in April 1941, converted with a false superstructure into a decoy for the HMS Anson in April 1941-1942 and finally sunk as a breakwater off Normandy in June 1944.
5. Of the Nelson-class with as sister ship Rodney. A simplified design of the G3 battle cruisers which was cancelled by the British Royal navy as a result of the Washing Naval Treaty of 1922. She was to able to compete with the USS Colorado and the Japanese Nagato battleship classes. Sister ship HMS Rodney. Her building was ordered in 1922, laid down on 28 December at Armstrong-Whitworth, Newcastle launched on 3 September 1925, commissioned on 15 August 1927, 1941-11942 extensively repairs needed as a result of an Italian torpedo, decommissioned in February 1948 and on 15 March a year begun her breaking up.
6. Of the Nelson-class with as sister ship the HMS Nelson, preceded by the never realized N3-class and the realized Revenge-class and succeeded by the King George V-class. Building ordered in 1922, laid down at Cammell Laird, Birkenhead, England on 28 December 1922, launched on 17 December 1925, sponsored by Princess Mary, completed in August 1927, commissioned on 10 November 1927, involved in the battle with the German battleship Bismarck 26-27 May 1941. decommissioned in 1946, stricken in 1947 and started at Inverkeithing, Scotland her breaking up on 26 March 1948. Building costs 7.617.799 pond sterling. Originally intended to be larger but as result of the Washington Naval Treaty of 1922 was her designed displacement limited to just 35.000 tons