Translate

Tuesday, 4 October 2022

The Romanian Navy Museum at Constanta



Our museum opened its gates on August 3, 1969, in the building that still houses it today, itself declared a historical monument due to the importance it has for the naval history.

The works at this building commenced on June 25, 1908 under the coordination of Architect I. Socolescu. Throughout the time, since its inauguration in 1909 and until 1961, this construction housed the Marine School, the Navy School twice, the Commandment of the Romanian Royal Navy, and then for a year it housed a Soviet barrack. It was also the headquarters of the Commandment of the Military Navy, and afterwards, in the last period, until its transformation into a museum, housed several civil institutions.

All Romanian means of navigation such as, monoxylon-boats, fishing vessels, ships or floating bridges, used for crossing the watercourses, were also used for military purposes, when the needs for defence, for obtaining and preserving the independence demanded it.

As an object of interest, you can see in this room an original monoxylon ("mono" - one and "xilos" - wood in Greek language.), unique in the country in terms of its integrity and state of preservation, having a length of 10 meters. It was dated to about 700 years old. The exposed watercraft was discovered in a swampy area in Răpsig, on the Crişul Alb valley, being brought to Constanţa in the '80s. 


The Tuzla Lighthouse was built in 1900 by the Barbier-Berand-Turenne French Company. It has the shape of a metallic tower with lattice, 44 m high, inside which there is a central tower painted with black and white horizontal stripes. The lighthouse's lens in front of you is in the form of an oval dome made of crystal prisms, with a height of 281 cm, a large diameter of 318 cm and about 3 tons in terms of weight. The light source of the lighthouse is inside the lens, consisting of an oil lamp with 6 concentric matches, with a consumption of 80 grams of petroleum per hour. The light pulse transmitted every 10 seconds was visible at 20 nautical miles. The lighthouse had a compressor fog signal, powered by an 11-hp engine, built by the Wolf plants in Bucharest. The engine and the compressor are also in the patrimony of the Romanian Navy Museum. 

Immediately after the recognition of Romania's State Independence by the Great Powers through the San Stefano Peace Congress and the Berlin Peace Congress in 1878, the governments of Bucharest adopted a fair policy of developing the Flotilla, given the fact that, as of that moment, Romania also had to defend the shore line of the Black Sea.

Two of the significant ships of the epoch are replicated in this room by their very elaborately created scale models.

The "Mircea" brigthe first training-sailing ship of the Military Navy (two-shafted), was built in England at the Thames Iron Works dockyards in London under the first Romanian fleet development program (1880) and entered into active service in 1882. It was given the name "Mircea" after the name of the ruler Mircea the Elder, the first Prince who obtained direct access to the Black Sea. The first commander of the brig was Colonel Nicolae Dimitrescu-Maican (1882). Between 1896 and 1899, topographic elevations of the Romanian shore line were made on the "Mircea" brig, on the basis of which the first marine map was produced in Romania, which was awarded in 1900 with the gold medal at the international contest in Paris. In 1931, the ship was taken out of service and got stationed in Galati. In April 1944, the brig was hit by a bomb during a Soviet aviation bombing in Galaţi.

The second scale model is that of the "Elisabeta" cruiser, built in 1888 at the Armstrong Dockyards in Newcastle and which, at the time of its entry into the active service of the Military Navy on November 5th the same year, was the most modern combat ship in the Black Sea. The ship was given, according to the customs of time, the name of the country's queen. It was the most important ship of the Romanian Military Navy until the First World War, remaining the core of the Sea Division for 25 years, serving a double purpose: to protect the shore line and to make the flag of independent Romania known in the Black Sea and beyond the Straits. 


1914 is considered in the universal history as a fateful year, because it marks the outbreak of the greatest conflict known to mankind until then, which the historiography calls the First World War. After two years of neutrality, Romania would enter this war on the side of the Entente on August 14, 1916. The responsibility of the first round in this war belonged to the Romanian navy, who, in the "last night of neutrality and the first night of war", executed a surprise attack with the famous torpedoes over the main Austro-Hungarian naval forces at Rusciuk. A few days later, the whole Navy man power was involved in the defence of the Turtucaia bridgehead. Regarding this great battle from the end of August 1916, in the memory of the heroes who sacrificed to carry out the retreat of many units of the Third Army, we preserve a scale model and a diorama representing the crew on board the famous "
Maior Nicolae Grigore Ioan" ship. They resisted the enemy fire, supporting the withdrawal until the last man of the Romanian land forces that were passing the Danube back to Romanian soil.

Also, another point of attraction of this room is the showcase where the Romanian and foreign decorations received by the Romanian officers during the battles in the Dobrogea theatre of operations are displayed. By decorating the Romanian Army officers, the Allies recognized their courage and spirit of sacrifice provided that the troops of the Central Powers, more numerous and better armed, exercised a strong pressure on the Romanian troops. Another showcase reminds of the personality of the counter-Admiral Nicholas Negrescu, commander of the Romanian-Russian Operations Fleet on the Danube, in 1916, by presenting a few objects that belonged to him. Here you can admire a "Morse" telegraph, two types of alidades with mirror and counterweight, a hand lantern, and also a gyroscope of the "Schwartzkopff" torpedo boat. 

In this room, another exhibit is the one of a 10-pipe Maxim Nordfelfelt machine gun, but also the original copies of the different types of mines used in those years, such as the "Vislovski" fluvial contact mine, with a mechanical trigger system can be seen, which was used for the construction of the Danube mine dams dating from 1914, the "Lernet" mine, of French fabrication, used at the Danube by units of the Romanian Army whose formation had more than 230 kg of explosive triggered by contact, but also the "Sauter-Harle" mine, also used by the Romanian navy during the First World War. You can also see in this room the first Romanian technical achievement in the field of underwater battle - the "Rădulescu" current mine, used in the actions of the Military Navy against the German and Austro-Hungarian Fleet until 1918. The commemorative plaque presented here reminds of the navy officers who died for the Country in the War for the replenishment of the nation (1916 – 1918)

Finally, along with an impressive collection of modern rifles, among the first ones to use smokeless black powder, in the endowment of the main combating armies of the First World War, you can also admire a few of the old automatic firearms: heavy-duty machine guns, with water-based cooling.


British battle cruiser HMS Renown cruising in the Far East according to the Weekly Intelligence Summary No. 41 dated 15 October 1921


An item reported that the British battle cruiser HMS Renown was to leave Bombay , India on 25 November, visit Muscat 28 November-2 December, Bunda Abbas 2-6 December, Bushiro 8-12 December, Koweit 12-15 December, Bombay 20 December-17 January 1922, Port Dubhol 17-20 January, Ratnagiri 20-25 January, Mangalore 27-31 January, Trincomali 3 February-2 March and again Bombay 6-8 March before arriving at Karachi on 10 March.

Note

1. Of the Renown-class with as sister ship the Repulse. Original laid down as an improved Revenge-class battleships design but when the First World War broke out was her completion delayed and afterwards completed as battle cruisers. Building ordered on 30 December 1914, laid down at Fairfield, Govan, Scotland on 25 January 1915, launched on 4 March 1916, commissioned on 20 September 1915 and sold on 19 March 1948.

Source

The National Archives, Kew Gardens, England CAB-24-129-24

Russian gunboat Khrabi best unit of Russian Baltic Fleet according to the Weekly Intelligence Summary No. 41 dated 15 October 1921

An item reported that despite the Russian gunboat Khivinetz was still lacking her armament she still was mentioned as part of the Russian Gunboat Squadron. The Khrabi (1)was sent into Kopora Bay for gun exercises at the end of August. She seemed to be the most efficient warship in the Russian Baltic Fleet.

Note

1. Laid down on 27 December 1894, launched on 21 November 1895, part of the Soviet navy since 30 December 1922, renamed Krasnoye Znamya, sunk by Finnish motor torpedo boats in the harbour of Lavansaari, Gulf of Finland on 18 November 1942, salvaged on 13 November 1943, decommissioned on 17 September 1944 and stricken in 1960.

Source

The National Archives, Kew Gardens, England CAB-24-129-24

German lighter 1028 lying at Odessa, Ukraine on 3 March 1943

In his letter dated Bucharest, Romania 3 March 1943 to the Reichskommissar dealing with the position of the tugs and lighters in Russian waters on that same day mentioned the Seetransportchef at Odessa, Ukraine the German lighter 1028.

Source

High Command of the Kriegsmarine (OKM). Case 227.

German lighter 1583 lying at Odessa, Ukraine on 3 March 1943

In his letter dated Bucharest, Romania 3 March 1943 to the Reichskommissar dealing with the position of the tugs and lighters in Russian waters on that same day mentioned the Seetransportchef at Odessa, Ukraine the German lighter 1583.

Source

High Command of the Kriegsmarine (OKM). Case 227.

Italian midget submarine CB 2 left Sevastopol, Ukraine according to the German War Diary of Admiral Black Sea dated 1 September 1943

An item reported the departure at 09:00 o’clock of the Italian midget submarine CB 2 from Sevastopol, Ukraine for anti submarine tasks in the Yevpatoria [Yevpatoria Bay near Yevpatoria, Crimea]. (1)

Note

1. Of the CB-class preceded by CA-class. Displacement 36 (surfaced)-45 (submerged) tons and as dimensions 15 x 3 x 2.10 metres. Crew numbered 4 men including 1 officer. Armament consisted of 2-45cm/17.7 torpedo tubes. Speed 7.5 (surfaced)-7 (submerged) knots. Range surfaced 1.400 nautical miles/5 knots respectively 450/7.5 and submerged 50/3 respectively 7/7. Built by Caproni-Taliedo. Commissioned 27 January 1941, transferred to the Black Sea area, in Romanian hands after the Italian armistice of 3 September 1943. scuttled in August 1944, salvaged by the Soviet Union, commissioned as TM-5, broken up in 1945 and stricken Italian naval list 27 February 1947

Source

German War Diary of Admiral, Black Sea 1-30 September 1943. Published by Department of the Navy. Washington, 1955.

Axis forces pressing forward to the Black Sea harbours according to the U.S. Joint Intelligence Committee. Daily summary dated 19 August 1942

An item referred to a J.I.C. comment reporting that the Axis forces were pressing forward to the Black Sea harbours although less fast than in the past.

Source

Map Room Papers (Roosevelt Administration), 1942 - 1945. U.S. Joint Intelligence Committee. Daily summary No. 252 dated 19 August 1942.

Japanese flying boat attacked Greek cargo ship on the Indian Ocean according to the U.S. Joint Intelligence Committee. Daily summary dated 18 August 1942

An item reported that a Japanese flying boat attacked on 14 August an anonymous Greek cargo ship off Vizagapatam halfway between Calcutta and Madras on the Indian Ocean.

Source

Map Room Papers (Roosevelt Administration), 1942 - 1945. U.S. Joint Intelligence Committee. Daily summary No. 251 dated 18 August 1942.

British warships HMS Vancouver and Yarmouth returning home according to the Weekly Intelligence Summary No. 8 dated 25 February 1922

Weymouth-class

An item reported that the departure from Gibraltar by the British warships HMS Vancouver (1) and Yarmouth (2) on 25 February bound for Portsmouth respectively Sheerness.

Notes

1. Part of V-class destroyers, preceded by S and Parker-classes, succeeded by HMS Ambuscade and Amazon, ordered under the 1916-1917 Emergency program on 30 June 1916, laid down by William Beardmore and Company, Clydebank, Scotland on 15 March 1917, launched on 28 December 1917, commissioned on 19 March 1918 renamed Vimy in April 1928, decommissioned in 1945, sold to be broken up in December 1917 executed in 1948.

2. Part of Town-class Weymouth sub-class light cruisers , succeeded by Arethusa-class, laid down by London&Glasgow Co., United Kingdom on 27 January 1910, launched on 12 April 1911, commissioned in April 1912 and sold to be broken up on 2 July 1929.

Source

The National Archives, Kew Gardens, England CAB-24-133-91

Hungary allowed by Allies to have some small vessels for police tasks in the Danube according to the Weekly Intelligence Summary No. 41 dated 15 October 1921

An item reported that at the Conference of Ambassadors the recommendation of the Commission of Control was accepted to allow Hungary for police tasks on the Danube and tributaries 8 patrol boats, 2 large and 10 smaller motor launches.

Source

The National Archives, Kew Gardens, England CAB-24-129-24

Japanese escort Destroyer Tsuta (1944-1947) and Taiwanese destroyer ROCS Hua Yung 1947->1958

Modified Japanese Matsu-class Tachibana sub-class escort destroyer Tsuta, preceded by the Otori-class torpedo boats and the Akizuki-class destroyers, building ordered in 1943, laid down by Yokosuka Naval Arsenal on 31 July 1944, launched on 2 November 1944, completed on 8 February 1945, stricken on 5 October 1945, acquired by Taiwan on 31 July 1947, wrecked in 1949 and in 1958 reported as being beyond economical repair. Displacement 1,580 tons and as dimensions 302.5 (between perpendiculars)-321.5 (waterline)-328 (over all) x 30 2/3 x 11 feet. 

Japanese potential troop transport Texas Maru in December 1921

On 22 May 1922 (!) received the Dutch naval staff at The Hague, Netherlands from the Dutch embassy at Tokyo, Japan a detailed specification of Japanese merchant ships of minimum 1.500 tons tonnage usable for troop transport over sea on 13 December 1921. If the transport was over a short distance for instance Japan-Philippines or Japan-Chinese harbour was the transport capacity increased with 10% and on a distance within 24 hours even doubled. The figures were supplied by non-Japanese experts, partly based on the troop transports between Japan-China and Japan-Siberia. The transports were kept secret. At that moment was Japan already considered as a potential enemy. For each ship was mentioned how many troops included equipment could be transported over a longer distance, for instance to an island belonging to the Dutch East Indies. In February-March 1942 invaded Japan indeed the Dutch East Indies.

Speed probably less then 10 miles, net tonnage 5,077 tons, gross tonnage 6,786 tons, transport capacity 2,250 men and owned by Kokusai K.K. Coal-fuelled.

Source

Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 inventory number 137 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands)

Japanese potential troop transport Shunko Maru in December 1921

On 22 May 1922 (!) received the Dutch naval staff at The Hague, Netherlands from the Dutch embassy at Tokyo, Japan a detailed specification of Japanese merchant ships of minimum 1.500 tons tonnage usable for troop transport over sea on 13 December 1921. If the transport was over a short distance for instance Japan-Philippines or Japan-Chinese harbour was the transport capacity increased with 10% and on a distance within 24 hours even doubled. The figures were supplied by non-Japanese experts, partly based on the troop transports between Japan-China and Japan-Siberia. The transports were kept secret. At that moment was Japan already considered as a potential enemy. For each ship was mentioned how many troops included equipment could be transported over a longer distance, for instance to an island belonging to the Dutch East Indies. In February-March 1942 invaded Japan indeed the Dutch East Indies.

Speed probably less then 10 miles, net tonnage 5,077 tons, gross tonnage 6,786 tons, transport capacity 2,250 men and owned by Goko Shokai Coal-fuelled.

Source

Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 inventory number 137 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands).

American destroyer escort USS Thomas (DE-102) 1943-1948 and Taiwanese frigate ROCS Tai Ho (23) 1948-1972

Part of Cannon-class destroyer escort, preceded by Buckley-class, succeeded by Edsall-class. Laid down by Dravo Corporation, Wilmington, Delaware, USA on 16 January 1943, launched on 31 July 1943, commissioned on 21 November 1943, decommissioned in March 1946, stricken on 22 December 1948, handed over to Taiwan on 14 December 1948 and stricken and broken up in 1972.

Displacement 1,240-1,900 (full loaded) tons and as dimensions 306 (over all) x 36.75 x 12 (maximum) feet. Armament by 1958: 4-7.62cm/3” 50 call dual purpose guns, 3/4-4cm anti aircraft guns,9/10-2cm anti aircraft guns, 8 depth charge throwers and 1x3-53.34cm/21” torpedo tube mounting. Diesel electric propulsion supplying via 2 shafts 6,000 bhp allowing a speed of 21 knots in theory, in service 91 knots. With 300 tons oil fuel bunker capacity and 11 knots speed a range of 11,500 nautical miles. Crew numbered 220 men.

American twin screw cargo attack ship with troop accommodation design S4-SE2-BE1in 1946

Steel built, raked stem and cruiser stern. Dimensions 426.0 (over all) x 58.0 (molded) x 37.0 (molded depth) x 16.0 (load draught molded) feet, deadweight 2,994 tons and bale cubic capacity 116,410 cubic feet. The  turbo-electric propulsion supplied 6,000  shp normal horsepower allowing a speed of 17.5 knots. Prewar domestic cost 2,750 US dollars, domestic war cost  4,115.343 US dollars, unadjusted statutory sales price 1,375,000 US dollars and floor price  1,400.370 US dollars. Prices based on bare boat after national defence features were removed and without adding passenger accommodation or additional cargo handling gear. Under the terms of the Ship Sales Act of 1946 was the adjusted statutory sales price not acceptable while Liberty ships excluded dry cargo ships were no tot be sold at less than 35% of the domestic war coast.  

Source

Federal register dated 17 August 1946 vol II, no. 79.

American twin screw transport attack ship design S4-SE2-BD1in 1946

Steel built, raked stem and cruiser stern. Dimensions 426.0 (over all) x 58.0 (molded) x 37.0 (molded depth) x 15.6 (load draught molded) feet, deadweight 2,660 tons and bale cubic capacity 95,320 cubic feet. The turbo-electric propulsion supplied 6,000 shp normal horsepower allowing a speed of 17.5 knots. Prewar domestic cost 2,750 US dollars, domestic war cost 4,115.343 US dollars, unadjusted statutory sales price 1,375,000 US dollars and floor price 1,400.370 US dollars. Prices based on bare boat after national defence features were removed and without adding passenger accommodation or additional cargo handling gear. Under the terms of the Ship Sales Act of 1946 was the adjusted statutory sales price not acceptable while Liberty ships excluded dry cargo ships were no tot be sold at less than 35% of the domestic war coast.  

Source

Federal register dated 17 August 1946 vol II, no. 79. 

Monday, 3 October 2022

Fin whale (Balaenoptera physalus)




Zeedijk, Westkapelle, Netherlands 3 October 2022

Dead body floating in North Sea discovered on 30 September off Belgian coast and driven ashore in the morning of 2 October. Length around 14 metres.

Heavily hunted in the 20th Century with more as 725,000 caught in the Southern Hemisphere in the period 1905-1976 it resulted that by 1977 only 38,000 were still alive. Since then hunting on the fin whale stopped except for Iceland and Japan which started again. Average length adult male and females 18,5 respectively 20 metres (61, 66 feet) with an average weight of 38.5 and 50.5 tons in the Northern Hemisphere with as figures for the Southern Hemisphere 20.5 respectively 22 metres and 52.5 respectively 63 tons.

American whaling barque Antelope visited Lahaina, Hawaii according to the newspaper The Polynesian dated 22 May 1852

An item reported the arrival at Lahaina, Hawaii on 10 May of the American whaling barque Antelope master Potter 5½ months out 25 barrels sperm oil. Cleared on 19 May for cruising. 

American whaler South America visited Honolulu, Hawaii according to the newspaper The Polynesian dated 29 May 1852

An item reported the arrival at Honolulu, Hawaii on 25 May of the American whaler South America master Walker 5 months out. Cleared for cruising on 26 May.

German whaler Republik visited Laihana, Hawaii according to the newspaper The Polynesian dated 22 May 1852

An item reported that at Lahaina, Hawaii on 1 May was cleared the German whaler Republik master Austin of Bremen, bound for Honolulu.

Belgian fishing vessel (ex-Yvonne K.8 1967-1989) Aquarius (Z-8) 1989-






Inner harbour Vlissingen, Netherlands 18 August 2022

Belgium-flagged, homeport Zeebrugge, MMSI 205264000, Europa register BEL00081967 and call sign OPAH. Built in 1967. Euro cutter

American whaling barque Baltic visited Lahaina, Hawaii according to the newspaper The Polynesian dated 22 May 1852

An item reported the arrival at Lahaina, Hawaii on 29 April of the American whaling barque Baltic master Brooks 5½ months out 100 barrels oil. Cleared on 8 May for cruising.

American whaler Hero visited Lahaina, Hawaii according to the newspaper The Polynesian dated 22 May 1852

An item reported the arrival at Lahaina, Hawaii on 6 May of the American whaler Hero master M ‘Cleave 6 months out 200 barrels sperm oil. Cleared on 15 May for cruising.

American whaler Hobomok visited Honolulu, Hawaii according to the newspaper The Polynesian dated 22 May 1852

An item reported that at Honolulu, Hawaii on 20 May was cleared the American whaler Hobomok master Callott for cruising

Dutch euro cutter (ex-Maris Stella KG.2 1981-1997) Adrianne (OD-3) 1997-






Inner harbour Vlissingen, Netherlands 18 August 2022

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Ouddorp, Netherlands, IMO 8008371, MMSI 245617000 and call sign PFWH. Casco built by Scheepswerf Veldthuis “Groningen’, Zuidbroek, Netherlands and completed by Padmos, Stellendam, Netherlands in 1981. As Maris Stella homeport Kortgene, Netherlands.

Chilean whaler Pescador visited Honolulu, Hawaii according to the newspaper The Polynesian dated 15 May 1852

An item reported that at Honolulu, Hawaii on 10 May was cleared the Chilean whaler Pescador master Heath for cruising. 

American whaler Hobomok visited Honolulu, Hawaii according to the newspaper The Polynesian dated 8 May 1852

An item reported that at [Honolulu, Hawaii] on 1 May arrived the American whaler Hobomok master Calot which lost 2 weeks earlier in a white squall 40 degrees North 166 degrees West all her three topmasts and the head of the mizzen mast within a minute. She departed from Hong Kong on 24 February where 35 whalers tried to get their crews complete but at the same time were shore and ships harassed by the small pox. The disease broke out after some ships gone out to sea but forced to return, one ship  tried even to leave without success two times. Her catch results in the winter time were 310 barrels sperm oil and hails 1,000 barrels sperm oil and 200 barrels whale oil. 

American whaler Charles Frederick visited Honolulu, Hawaii according to the newspaper The Polynesian dated 15 May 1852

An item reported the arrival at Honolulu, Hawaii on 13 May of the American whaler Charles Frederick master Haskins 20 months out. 

Saturday, 1 October 2022

Japanese Second World War landing craft type C variation

Steel built. Displacement 18 tons and as dimensions 49 (over all) x 11.6 x 4 (maximum) feet. Propulsion consisted of 1-350 hp diesel engine. Speed >12-14< knots. Endurance 10 hours. Crew numbered 13-15 men. Armament consisted of 2x1-5.7cm tank guns fitted in armoured shields and 2x2-1.3cm guns in armoured bridge positions. This variation of landing craft type C was to be used for coastal patrols, barge escorting and to destroy shore-based gun and observation posts.

USA feared second Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii according to the U.S. Joint Intelligence Committee. Daily summary dated 11 March 1942

An item referred to a reliable British source which predicted that the Japanese would attack Pearl Harbor again in the near future to destroy the naval base completely as it was an important threat for their targets. Personally the source that Japanese were not afraid of great losses in realizing their objectives and they tend to do the unexpectedly. The initial bombing attempt was not a complete success but they would try to do it again in a combination of flying boats with warships or submarines.

Source

Map Room Papers (Roosevelt Administration), 1942 - 1945. U.S. Joint Intelligence Committee. Daily summary No. 91 dated 11 March 1942.

Position of German aircraft carrier Graf Zeppelin unknown according to the U.S. Joint Intelligence Committee. Daily summary dated 12 March 1942

Schiffbau, Schiffahrt und Hafenbau 15 January 1939

An item reported that according to the press the German aircraft carrier Graf Zeppelin was off the Norwegian west coast, however she seemed to be at Gdynia, Poland.(1)

Note

1. Contracted as the Flugzeugträger A on 16 November 1935, laid down by Deutsche Werke on 28 December 1936 as part of the Graf Zeppelin-class, launched on 8 December 1938, never completed, scuttled at Stettin in March 1945, salvaged by the Soviet Union in March 1946 and finally sunk during weapon tests north of Poland on 16 August 1947. Her wreck was found back on 12 July 2006.

Source

Map Room Papers (Roosevelt Administration), 1942 - 1945. U.S. Joint Intelligence Committee. Daily summary No. 92 dated 12 March 1942.

Japanese Second World War landing craft type C variation

This variation was sighted off Cape Gloucester. Displacement 18 tons and as dimensions 49 (over all) x 11.6 x 4 (maximum) feet. Propulsion consisted of 1-350 hp diesel engine. Speed >12-14< knots. Endurance 10 hours. Crew numbered 13-15 men. Armament consisted od 3x1-1.3cm shielded guns. 

German warships Tirpitz, Admiral Scheer and probably Prinz Eugen lying at Trondheim, Norway according to the U.S. Joint Intelligence Committee. Daily summary dated 19 March 1942


An item reported that the German battleship Tirpitz(1) seemed to have returned at Trondheim, Norway on 13 March and was there five days still lying. Also the German pocket battleship Admiral Scheer (2) and a German heavy Admiral Hipper-class (which seemed to be the Prinz Eugen seriously damaged below the waterline according to reliable sources) were lying there as was reported in Summary No. 92.(3)

Notes

1. Laid down by Kriegsmarinewerft Wilhelmshaven, Germany on 2 November 1936, launched on 1 April 1939, commissioned on 25 February 1941 and sunk by the Royal Air Force on 12 November 1944 at Tromsø, Norway, with her wreck broken up between 1948-1957. Of the Bismarck-class as answer on the French Richelieu-class battleships.

2. Of the Deutschland-class panzerschiffe later classified as heavy cruisers preceded by the Admiral Hipper-class. Main armament 2x3-28cm/11”guns on fore and aft ship one turret. Laid down by Kriegsmarinewerft Wilhelmshaven, Germany on 25 June 1931, launched on 1 April 1933, commissioned on 12 November 1934, sunk during an air attack at Kiel, Germany on 9 April 1945, partly broken up and the remains used of filling up the inner part of the dockyard.

3. Of the Admiral Hipper-class heavy cruisers, preceded by Deutschland-class. Laid down by Germaniawerft, Kiel on 23 April 1936, launched on 22 August 1938, commissioned on 1 August 1940, decommissioned on 7 May 1945, surrendered on 8 May 1945, handed over to the USA and sunk on 22 December 1946 during nuclear tests.

Source

Map Room Papers (Roosevelt Administration), 1942 - 1945. U.S. Joint Intelligence Committee. Daily summary No. 99 dated 19 March 1942

American cargo ship Sea Witch lost according to the U.S. Joint Intelligence Committee. Daily summary dated 19 March 1942

An item referred to an announcement of the British naval authorities in India that the American cargo ship Sea Witch transporting US Army aviation personnel and material from Australia towards India was lost.

Note

1. Identical with C2 motor ship completed by Tampa Shipbuilding&Engineering Company, Tampa, Florida in July 1940, handed over on 30 July 1940, acquired by the War Shipping Administration on 26 January 1942 at Port Pirie, Australia, part of Convoy MS.5 bound for Colombo, Ceylon leaving Freemantle, Australia on 22 February 1942 , but underway ordered to Tjilatjap, Dutch East Indies, unloaded the aircraft and went back to Australia and served during the war, sold in 1947 and became a merchant ship, first American owned than Swedish as Axel Salen, resold in 1951 and renamed Bastasen en in the same year Warszawa

Source

Map Room Papers (Roosevelt Administration), 1942 - 1945. U.S. Joint Intelligence Committee. Daily summary No. 99 dated 19 March 1942