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Thursday, 26 May 2016

Standby and safety vessel (ex-Terneuzen 1954-1981, Polaris 1981-1982, Polaris I 1982-1995) Tender 1 1995-




First inner harbour of Vlissingen, Netherlands 26 May 2016

Netherlands-flagged, IMO 8134039, MMSI 244084000 and call sign PHXT. Built at the Haarlemsche Scheepsbouw, Haarlem, Netherlands in 1954. Former pilot vessel. Ex-Terneuzen renamed 1981, Polaris renamed 1982 and Polaris I renamed 1995.

British naval budget 1909 including building six submarines according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1908-1909 no. 5

An item reported that the British submarines asked for the budget year approval of the building of 6-circa 400 ton submersibles. The experiences collected during the building of the recently completed boats was to be used in the new planned ones.

German navy increasing her submarine fleet still with the help of private shipyards according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1908-1909 no. 5

An item reported that a private source denied that the German submarines no longer were to be built by private shipyards but from now on by the naval shipyards. The Germaniawerft at Kiel, Germany received a order to built some submarines.

German navy increasing her submarine fleet rapidly according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1908-1909 no. 5


An item reported that the  submarine U-2 was commissioned at Danzig on 18 July. The building of the other boats was speeded up for their completion in next spring. For new boats were to be commissioned in the end of 1909.

Too large machinery caused problems during building new Russian battleships according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1905-1906 no.8


An item referred to the Army and Naval Journal reporting that the building of the Russian battleships Pawel I (1) and Andrei Perwoswanny (2) was stopped due to the fact that the machinery was too large to be placed inside the hulls. A commissioned was ordered to investigate this problem. According to rumours occurred this same problem by the battleships Ioann Statoust (3) and Iefstafi (4) now being built at Black Sea shipyards.

Notes
1. Imperator Pavel I of the Andrei Pervozvanny-class. Building approved on 16 August 1903, baptized on 26 September 1903, actual building at the Baltic Works, St. Petersburg, Russia started on 14 October 1904, ceremonial laid down was cancelled until her launching on 25 August 1907 and commissioned on 30 October 1911.
2. Andrei Pervozvanny of the Andrei Pervozvanny-class, building approved on 16 August 1903, baptized 22 August 1903, actual building at the Galeryni island Shipyard, St. Petersburg, Russia started on 2 March 1904, ceremonial laid down on 28 April 1905, launched on 7 October 1906, commissioned on 28 February 1911
3. Ioann Zlatoust of the Evstafi-class, laid down at Sevastolpol Shipyard, Sevastopol on 13 November 1904, launched on 13 May 1906 and commissioned on 1 April 1911.
4. Evstafi of the Evstafi-class, laid down at the Nikolayev Admiralty Shipyard, Nikolayev on 23 November 1904, launched on 3 November 1906 and commissioned on 28 May 1911.

Dutch frigate Zr. Ms. Prins van Oranje threatened by burning tar pontoon according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated Thursday 11 October 1855

Model Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, Netherlands. Original url 

Model Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, Netherlands. Original url

An item reported that on last Monday around 12.00 o’clock in the tar pontoon lying in the Marinehaven off the dry dock at Vlissingen, Netherlands fire broke out on that she moment men on board were heating tar. Due to the heavy burning of the tar and a raising wind became the situation dangerous also for the Dutch frigate Zr. Ms. Prins van Oranje (1) lying in the dry dock. A fire engine of the navy yard, one of the municipality and crewmembers armed with extinguishing media coming from the guard ship Zr. Ms. Sambre (2) managed to extinguish the fire before it would be unmanageable.

Notes
1. Former Waal, frigate 1st class, call sign GQSB, on stocks at the navy yard at Rotterdam, Netherlands by P. Glavimans Jz. In August 1828, launched on 16 May 1840, renamed Prins van Oranje in 1844, later guard ship, sold on a public auction at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands at 12.30 o’clock on Thursday 6 Augustus 1896, sold to Mr. M.S. Sprenger, Amsterdam, Netherlands for ƒ 12.263,63, dimensions 54 (load line) x 14 (inner hull) x 5,8-6,3 (aft) x 7,13 (hold below upper deck) metres, 2.481-2.485 tons displacement, 60 (peace:30-30pd guns, 30-30pd carronades, 2-12pd guns))-70 (war) guns and a sail area of 2.170m2.
2. Former Algiers, frigate 2nd class, call sign GQTL, building ordered by decision nr. 16 on 15 April 1816, on stocks at navy yard at Amsterdam, Netherlands in June 1818, launched on 27 August 1821, coppered 1821, commissioned by decision no. 30 of 18 February 1822, renamed Sambre by decision no. 100 dated 5 April 1828, razeed as 28 guns frigate on 1836, guard ship at Willemsoord, Netherlands since 1 May 1850, guard ship at Vlissingen 1851-1 November 1866, stricken in 1867, broken at the navy yard at Vlissingen, Netherland the same year 1461 tons displacement, dimensions 163 x 42 x 22 27/11 feet, an armament of 44 guns and a crew numbering 300 men.
of the government en for this purpose were temporarily 25 labourers hired.

Dutch screw steam corvette Zr. Ms. Prinses Amelia to be launched at Vlissingen, Netherlands according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated Thursday 11 October 1855

Model Prinses Amelia, Rijksmuseum Amsterdam, Netherlands NG-MC-487.  Original url

An item reported the intended launching at the navy yard at Vlissingen, Netherlands on next Friday of the Dutch steam corvette Zr. Ms. Prinses Amelia (1) which was laid down there in 1853. She was to be commissioned in spring 1856 just like the kuil corvette Zr. Ms. Prins Maurits der Nederlanden.(2)

Notes
1. Former ‘kuil’ corvette Borneo, ‘kuil’corvette, on stocks at the navy yard at Rotterdam, Netherlands 30 August 1845, designed by K. Turk, disassembled and transported to the navy yard of Vlissingen, Netherlands in August 1850, laid down by P.A. Bruin 29 July 1853, launched as Princes Amelia as corvette with steam power afternoon Friday 12 October 1855, call sign GQRL, guard ship at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies 1872-1875, condemned and sold on auction at Surabaya for ƒ 20.000 to be broken up on 9 October 1875, dimensions 36,50 x 10,3 x 4,82 metres as Borneo and as Prinses Amelia 49,8 (load line between perpendiculars)-53,6 (foreside prow-aft side rudder stern) x 11 (inner hull) x 4,5(fore)-5,0 (aft) x 5,71 (depth) metres, displacement, 776 (Borneo)-1.350 (Prinses Amelia) tons, 807 tonnage (Prinses Amelia 1874), 16-19 (Prinses Amelia)-28 (Borneo) guns, crew as Prinses Amelia numbering 178 (1874)-207 men, maximum speed under steam 6-7knots and a horsepower of 150 hp. Armament as the Prinses Amelia consisted on gun deck of 12 long 30pd gun no. 2, 4-heavy 2”grenade guns no. 2 and on upper deck 1 long 30pd pivot gun no. 2 and at both sides 1 long 30pd gun no. 2. In 1869 8-long 30 pd guns, 4-20” grenade guns and 4-4pd rifled guns.
2. Former Atalante, ‘kuil’corvette, call sign GQRV, laid down at the navy yard at Vlissingen, Netherlands 9 June 1842 by P.A. Bruijn, launched 21 July 1849, renamed Prins Maurits der Nederlanden 1850, guard ship 1869-1870 Vlissingen and at Amsterdam, Netherlands 1877, decommissioned 1 October 1904, stricken 1905, sold an a public auction 11.00 o’clock for ƒ 16.788 to M.S. Springers at Amsterdam, Netherlands Thursday 10th January1907, sold within some days to a group of persons at Den Helder, Netherlands to break her up, 776 tons displacement, dimensions 36,50 x 10,30 x 4,80 metres, 18 (1869:medium 30pd)-26 guns and a crew of 200 men (1-10-1877).

Dutch screw steam schooner Zr. Ms. Montrado executing trial according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated Tuesday 28 August 1855

Model rijksmuseum Amsterdam, Netherlands. Original url

An item reported the departure on the 23rd in the roads of Nieuwediep, Netherlands by the steam schooner Zr. Ms. Montrado lieutenant 1st class J. Andreae on behalf of a trial on the North Sea and in the Channel.(1)

Note
1. Screw steam schooner Montrado, ex-Vuurpijl renamed 1874, earlier classifed as screw steamship 4th class, laid down by engineer A.E. Tromp at the navy yard of Amsterdam, Netherlands on 13 June 1853, renamed Montrado in 1854, launched on 12 August 1854, commissioned on 1 December 1854, docked at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands 21-27 February 1861 and 16 November 1861-18 February 1862 and 25-27 March 1862, condemned and sold at the naval establishment at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies for ƒ 11.000 to Mr. Nicolaï and her inventory for more as ƒ 1.500 on Saturday 13 April 1867, dimensions  40,0 (between perpendiculars)-42,15 x 8,00-8,16 x 2,7 (aft)-3,30 (aft) x 4,32 (hold) metres, a displacement of 407tons, an armament of 8 (4-12pd, 4-30pd carronades)-10 guns and 70hp horsepower.

Dutch screw steam corvette Zr. Ms. Medusa arrived at Nieuwediep, Netherlands coming from Vlissingen, Netherlands according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated Tuesday 28 August 1855

Model Rijksmuseum Amsterdam, Netherlands. Original url

An item reported the arrival on the 23rd in the roads of Nieuwediep, Netherlands of the steam corvette Zr. Ms. Medusa captain H.J. van Maldeghem coming from Vlissingen, Netherlands. Since the improvements performed she well during the voyage.(1)

Note
1. Laid down at the navy yard of Amsterdam, Netherlands by A.E. Tromp on 25 November 1852, launched on 22 June 1854, departed from the shipyard on 23 November 1854, decommissioned 1 May 1865, converted with small costs into an accommodation ship to serve at the naval establishment at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies ,displacement 1.241 tons and as dimensions 51,50 x 11,14 x 5,00 metres, horsepower of 150 hp, an armament of 19 guns and a crew numbering 240 men.

Dutch frigate Prins Alexander der Nederlanden lacking favourable winds for departure towards the West Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated Tuesday 28 August 1855

An item reported the departure from the roads of Nieuwediep, Netherlands of the Dutch frigate Prins Alexander der Nederlanden captain J.F.E. von Römer while firing gun salutes towards the West Indies. Shortly afterwards was she forced to return due to changing of the wind direction.(1)

Note
1. Former Lek, frigate 2nd class, call sign GQRJ, on stocks at Amsterdam, Netherlands 1832, launched 3 September 1844, renamed Prins Alexander der Nederlanden 1844 , guard ship 1871, condemned, sold on a public auction lying at the naval establishment Onrust, Dutch East Indies on Wednesday 21 May 1873 at 10.00 o’clock by John Price&Co. at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies, 1460 tons displacement, dimensions 46,21 x 12,20 x 6,00 metres and an armament of 22 (as guard ship)-44 guns.

French transport La Marne temporarily lying off Texel, Netherlands underway towards the Baltic according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated 25 August 1855

An item reported the arrival off Texel, Netherlands in the early morning of the 20th of the French frigate with auxiliary steam power also indicated as transport La Marne commanding officer De Barmont coming from Cherbourg, France bound for the Baltic. On board were victuals and ammunition and 200 Russian prisoners who were to be exchanged. Due to lacking enough geographical knowledge sailed she into the direction of the coastal light striking a sandbank although without much damage except for a small damage of the engine. She anchored safely and continued her voyage the same day

Dutch frigate Zr. Ms. Prins Alexander der Nederlanden bound for the West Indies and the Mediterranean according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated 25 August 1855

An item dated Nieuwediep, Netherlands 21th reported that with favourable wind conditions the Dutch frigate Zr. Ms. Prins Aelxander der Nederlanden intended to depart that week towards the West Indies. She was first to deliver ammunition and victuals for the warships lying off Surinam and Curacao and to sail from there towards the Mediterranean with the intention to return to the Netherlands in 1856.(1)

Note
1. Former Lek, frigate 2nd class, call sign GQRJ, on stocks at Amsterdam, Netherlands 1832, launched 3 September 1844, renamed Prins Alexander der Nederlanden 1844 , guard ship 1871, condemned, sold on a public auction lying at the naval establishment Onrust, Dutch East Indies on Wednesday 21 May 1873 at 10.00 o’clock by John Price&Co. at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies, 1460 tons displacement, dimensions 46,21 x 12,20 x 6,00 metres and an armament of 22 (as guard ship)-44 guns.

Wednesday, 25 May 2016

Dutch transport Zr. Ms. Heldin bound for Syria according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated Saturday 25 August 1860

An item reported that the Dutch transport Zr. Ms. Heldin lieutenant 1st class P. Toutenhoofd underway from the Nieuwediep, Netherlands underway towards Alexandria, Egypt and Syria on last Saturday arrived at Portsmouth, England.(1)

Note
1. One-deck flush-decked corvette, call sign GQKL, laid down at the navy yard at Vlissingen, Netherlands 31 July 1839 by C. Soetermeer/A.E. Tromp, launched 26 May 1842, docked at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands 20-28 September 1854 and 15 December 1856-12 April 1858, store ship for projectiles in the harbour of Nieuwediep, Netherlands, training battery until 30 November 1907, accommodation ship for the Hr.Ms. Marnix 1908, accommodation for the ‘vuurwerkmakerij’ with materials transferred from Vlissingen, Netherlands towards Willemsoord, Netherlands January 1915, displacement 775 tons and as dimensions 36,5 (between perpendiculars) x 10,00 (inner hull) x 4,25 (fore)-4,82 (aft) x 5,39 (hold below main deck) and an original armament of 20-12pd guns or 20-30pd carronades, 8-12pd carronades and 2-6pd guns, later reduced to 10 guns (included 12cm guns). Figurehead female torso in roman armour decorated with ribbons.

Dutch screw steamship 3rd class Zr. Ms. Reteh bound for the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated 16 August 1860


An item reported that according to a royal decision of the 10th Dutch screw steamship Zr. Ms. Reteh lying at Amsterdam, Netherlands was to be commissioned on the 16th with as destination the Dutch East Indies. Her etat major consisted of lieutenant 1st class jhr. GH.P. de Kock, commanding officer, lieutenant 2nd class G.W.C. Westenberg, 1st officer, lieutenants 2nd class J.A.P.J. de Roy van Zuidewijn, jhr. T.E. de Brauw and J.C. Joekes and officer of administration 3rd class B.M.E. Crevecoeur.(1)

Note
1. Screw steamship 3rd class, call sign GQSR, laid down at the navy yard at Amsterdam Netherlands as Sprinkhaan on 18 March 1858, launched on 19 April 1860, renamed Reteh in 1859, decommissioned and condemned in 1871, building costs ƒ 329.428,25½. dimensions 43,00 x 9,20 x 4,30 metres, a displacement of 759 tons, horsepower 119nhp/250 ehp speed 7 knots, an armament of 6 guns and a crew numbering 100 men.

Dutch paddle steamship 2nd class Zr. Ms. Cycloop bound for the Mediterranean according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated Tuesday 7 August 1860


Model NG-MC-480 Rijksmuseum Amsterdam, Netherlands. Original url

An item dated Willemsoord, Netherlands 3rd reported the arrival on last Wednesday of the Dutch steamship Zr. Ms. Cycloop (1) with on board the steam engines loaded in France. Her commanding officer captain lieutenant J.P.G. Mulder was dismissed on the 15th. She was then destined towards the Mediterranean to add the Dutch squadron. The Dutch government was interested to hear if the squadron also visited Alexandria, Egypt where the Dutch consul was harassed by an armed crowd who entered his house where a Christian girl seek refuge and who kidnapped her.

Note
1. Paddle steamship 2nd/3rd class, call sign GQHB, on stocks at navy yard at Vlissingen, Netherlands by A.E. Tromp on 23 July 1840, commissioned on 1 June 1843, launched on 13 June, refitted to be used as transport for royalties in 1845, docked at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands 11-14 September 1850, 13-February-2 September and 15 November-1 December 1856 and 29 July-1 August 1861, transferred to the Indische Militaire Marine in 1867, condemned and stricken 1873, dimensions 47,00 (on load lone between perpendiculars) x 8,95 (inner hull) x 3,5 (medium) x 5,36 (hold amidships to main deck) metres, 875 tons displacement, 2 masts,1 funnel, 6 guns (consisting of 1-20cm grenade gun, 1 rifled 16cm gun, 4-30 pd carronades, according to Obreen in wartime 2-20“grenade guns, 4 medium 30pd guns, in peace time 2 long 30pd guns, 2-medium 30pd guns and 10-1pd swivels)), 220 hp horsepower and a crew numbering 90-100 men.

Dutch training brig Zr. Ms. Ternate arrived at Willemsoord, Netherlands according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated Saturday 4 August 1860

An item reported the arrival on last Wednesday of the Dutch training brig Zr. Ms. Ternate lieutenant 1st class A.M.J. van Asperen in the roads of Willemsoord, Netherlands.(1)

Note
1. Ternate, brigantine/schooner brig, call sign GQWB, wood-built, on stocks at navy yard at Amsterdam, Netherlands June 1846, launched 1849, docked at the navy yard of Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands 25 October-7 December 1852 and 16-19 May 1859, training ship 1876, stricken 1893, condemned 1904, served also in the Dutch West Indies, dimensions 28,50 x 8,70 x 3,30 metres, 252 tons displacement, an armament of 4 (1877: medium:30-pd guns)-6 guns and a crew numbering 96 men (1 October 1877).

Dutch transport Zr. Ms. Heldin bound for Egypt according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated Saturday 4 August 1860

An item reported the departure on last Wednesday of the Dutch transport Zr. Ms. Heldin captain lieutenant P. Toutenhoofd from Willemsoord, Netherlands via Malta towards Alexandria, Egypt. The edition of the 7th referred to tidings dated Willemsoord 3rd that she was still lying there waiting for the first favourable wind. The edition of the 16th reported that she actually left in the morning of the 13th.(1)

Note
1. One-deck flush-decked corvette, call sign GQKL, laid down at the navy yard at Vlissingen, Netherlands 31 July 1839 by C. Soetermeer/A.E. Tromp, launched 26 May 1842, docked at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands 20-28 September 1854 and 15 December 1856-12 April 1858, store ship for projectiles in the harbour of Nieuwediep, Netherlands, training battery until 30 November 1907, accommodation ship for the Hr.Ms. Marnix 1908, accommodation for the ‘vuurwerkmakerij’ with materials transferred from Vlissingen, Netherlands towards Willemsoord, Netherlands January 1915, displacement 775 tons and as dimensions 36,5 (between perpendiculars) x 10,00 (inner hull) x 4,25 (fore)-4,82 (aft) x 5,39 (hold below main deck) and an original armament of 20-12pd guns or 20-30pd carronades, 8-12pd carronades and 2-6pd guns, later reduced to 10 guns (included 12cm guns). Figurehead female torso in roman armour decorated with ribbons.

Dutch steam frigates Zr. Ms. Vice Admiraal Wassenaar, Evertsen and Zeeland serving off Syrua to protect the Christian inhabitans according to the Dutch newspaper Zierikzeesche Courant dated 28 July 1860

Wassenaar as training ship at Amsterdam, Netherlands


Model Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, Netherlands. Original url

An item reported that the Dutch steam frigates Zr. Ms. Vice Admiraal Wassenaar (1), Evertsen (2) and Zeeland (3) after their arrival at Malta were to be ordered to go towards Syria to cooperate with other European countries to protect the Christians there. The Dutch transport Zr. Ms. Heldin (4) lying at Nieuwediep, Netherlands was to depart with all haste towards Malta loaded with victuals and ammunition for the Dutch squadron and then to return immediately to pick up at Willemsoord a second similar cargo for Malta.

Notes
1. Call sign GQBE, wood-built, laid down at the navy yard at Amsterdam, Netherlands as the 74 gun ship of the line Piet Hein on 15 February 1833, disassembled 1850, laid down as a screw steam frigate designed by A.E. Tromp in 1853, launched as the Admiraal van Wassenaar on 6 September1856, commissioned on 16 July 1857, converted into a training ship at the navy yard of Amsterdam 1875, commissioned for training boys and ordinary seaman 11 April 1876, until 1 January 1913 used as training and guard ship at Amsterdam and sold on 28 May at Amsterdam for ƒ 37.781,00 to be broken up, displacement 3.650 tons, dimensions 62,36 (between perpendiculars)-72,86 (over all) x 15,72 x 6,80 metres, horsepower 300 hp, speed maximum 10,67 miles, armament 8 (4 medium 30pd guns, 4-12cm guns, 1877: long 12pd guns)-45 guns and a crew numbering 450 men. On 1 October 1876 were 335 boys trained divided over 4 groups, the youngest (group 1) numbered 108 boys, groups no.2-4 respectively 103, 60 and 64.
2. Call sign GQJK. Laid down at the navy yard at Vlissingen, Netherlands on 16 October 1854, launched, on Monday 21 September 1857, destined for training sea militia 1 May 1877, decommissioned on 15 November 1881, at the navy yard at Willemsoord, Netherlands engines and boilers removed, renamed Neptunus on 11 March 1893, used as accommodation for army personnel September 1914, stricken in 1921. Wood-built. With a displacement of 3.300 ton were her dimensions 63,50 x 15,70 x 6,80 metres. The horsepower of 400 hp allowed a speed of 8 knots. Her crew numbered 500 men. The original armament consisted of 51 guns (1 long 60pd gun, 42 long 30pd guns and 8 rifled 16cm guns) and in 1882 into 4-12cm guns, 8-7,5cm guns and 2-3,7cm guns. Her design of the stern including screw shaft entrance was altered despite protests of the engineers resulting in severe vibrations. The Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated 17 September 1877 reported the intended launching on Saturday 19th between 13.00-14.00 o’clock. The minister of navy was expected to arrival on Friday to attend her launching. She was called a frigate with steam power. The edition of the 22nd reported however that the launching failed when the ship stocked after just 1/3 or ¼ of the slip. Despite all efforts which continued into the evening to remove the obstacles which prevent the further launching process did men not succeeded in doing so. The next day [=Sunday] was the whole day worked to get everything well. She was according to the Nederlandsche Staatscourant dated the 23rd finally launched on Monday 21st.
3. Screw steamship 1st class, call sign GRDC, wood-built, laid down at the navy yard at Vlissingen, Netherlands 28 February 1856, launched 31 July 1859, stricken 1874, guard ship at Batavia, Dutch East Indies 1875, decommissioned 8 December 1883, towed half January 1884 towards the roads of Surabaya, Dutch East Indies, sold on an auction for ƒ 20.600,00 to the Arab Sai Agil bin Hijdroes to be broken up in the morning of 15th March 1884, dimensions 63,5 x 15,7 x 6,7 metres, displacement 3.300 tons, horsepower 400 hp, speed 8 miles, a crew numbering 500 men and an armament of 4 (as guard ship 1-15cm, 3-12cm guns)-51 guns (consisting of 1 long 60pd gun, 30-long 30pd guns, 12-20” grenade guns and 8 rifled 16cm guns).
4. One-deck flush-decked corvette, call sign GQKL, laid down at the navy yard at Vlissingen, Netherlands 31 July 1839 by C. Soetermeer/A.E. Tromp, launched 26 May 1842, docked at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands 20-28 September 1854 and 15 December 1856-12 April 1858, store ship for projectiles in the harbour of Nieuwediep, Netherlands, training battery until 30 November 1907, accommodation ship for the Hr.Ms. Marnix 1908, accommodation for the ‘vuurwerkmakerij’ with materials transferred from Vlissingen, Netherlands towards Willemsoord, Netherlands January 1915, displacement 775 tons and as dimensions 36,5 (between perpendiculars) x 10,00 (inner hull) x 4,25 (fore)-4,82 (aft) x 5,39 (hold below main deck) and an original armament of 20-12pd guns or 20-30pd carronades, 8-12pd carronades and 2-6pd guns, later reduced to 10 guns (included 12cm guns). Figurehead female torso in roman armour decorated with ribbons.

Dutch Burgemeester Hoffman transporting troops from Netherlands and the Dutch Gold Coast towards the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Zierikzeesche Courant dated 28 July 1860

An item dated Harderwijk, Netherlands 23rd reported that a detachment military for the Dutch army in the Dutch East Indies would embark at Rotterdam, Netherlands on the 28th the merchant ship Burgemeester Hoffman master T.D. de Wit. At St. George d’Elmina was a detachment negro recruits to be picked up and from there to be brought transported towards Java. The 4 petty officers and corporals who were embarked at Rotterdam were temporarily detached at St. George d’Elmina where they would replace the petty officers and corporals there serving. The latter were also destined towards Java.

Dutch screw steamship 2nd class Zr. Ms. Groningen lying at Nagasaki, Japan according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated 12 June 1860

An item referred to tidings dated Nagasaki, Japan 12th April received from the Dutch department of navy from the Dutch screw steam corvette Zr. Ms. Groningen reporting the events over there.(1) On 24th February was the regent for the emperor (2) on the private way of Jedo attacked and heavily wounded, according to some rumours even killed. People feared for a civil war which would be a worse case for the trade. The Groningen suffered from heavy storms and returned at Nagasaki although with little damage was her rudder broken.

Notes
1. Screw steamship 2nd class, on stocks at F. Smit, Kinderdijk, Netherlands 1855, launched 1857, commissioned 25 May or 1 July 1857, served also in the Dutch East Indies, stricken, breaking up started at the navy yard at Amsterdam, Netherlands on 29 July 1863, dimensions 58,82 x 10,74 x 5,00 metres, 1457 tons displacement, an armament of 14 guns, a crew numbering 158 men and 250npk/700epk horsepower.
2. The emperor must be Emperor Meiji (3 November 1852-30 July 1912), which personal name was Mutsuhito.

Dutch paddle steamship 2nd Zr, Ms. Cycloop executing several tasks according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated 12 June 1860



Model Cycloop NG-MC-480 Rijksmuseum Amsterdam, Netherlands. Original url

An item reported that the Dutch steamship Zr. Ms. Cycloop (1) departed Den Helder, Netherlands towards Vlissingen, Netherlands to pick up the schooner Wesp (2) if the sailing conditions were not improved. She was to exercise a voyage with boatswain trainees on the Zuiderzee. Afterwards was the Cycloop bound for Sweden to pick up guns for the Dutch navy.

Notes
1. Cycloop, paddle steamship 2nd/3rd class, call sign GQHB, on stocks at navy yard at Vlissingen, Netherlands by A.E. Tromp on 23 July 1840, commissioned on 1 June 1843, launched on 13 June, refitted to be used as transport for royalties in 1845, docked at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands 11-14 September 1850, 13-February-2 September and 15 November-1 December 1856 and 29 July-1 August 1861, transferred to the Indische Militaire Marine in 1867, condemned and stricken 1873, dimensions 47,00 (on load lone between perpendiculars) x 8,95 (inner hull) x 3,5 (medium) x 5,36 (hold amidships to main deck) metres, 875 tons displacement, 2 masts,1 funnel, 6 guns (consisting of 1-20cm grenade gun, 1 rifled 16cm gun, 4-30 pd carronades, according to Obreen in wartime 2-20“grenade guns, 4 medium 30pd guns, in peace time 2 long 30pd guns, 2-medium 30pd guns and 10-1pd swivels)), 220 hp horsepower and a crew numbering 90-100 men.
2. Schooner, call sign GRCK, on stocks at the navy yard at Rotterdam, Netherlands on 4 September 1843, launched on 21 October 1844, stricken in 1868, dimensions 27,00 x 8,30 x 3,20 metres, displacement 198 tons displacement and an armament of 3 guns. 

Dutch steam flotilla vessel Zr, Ms. Hector executed her trials as sailing ship according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated 12 June 1860

An item referred to a tiding dated Den Helder, Netherlands 8th reporting the arrival that morning at 06.00 o’clock in the roads by the Dutch screw steam flotilla vessel Zr. Ms. Hector entering the harbour some hours later. She was 3 days earlier departed for her trials as sailing vessel. Earlier executed she her trials as steamship which was hardly to be called a success. Even with full power exaggerated her speed not 5 miles. As sailing vessel she performed much better with 7 miles. She swayed quite but on the other hand was the weather rough just like the sea. Her etat major consisted of lieutenant 1st class P.M. van der Haak, commanding officer, lieutenants 2nd class J.W.F. Frucht and E.L. Ehnle, officer of health 3rd class G.J.C. Broers and adjunct administrator J.A. Laghaay.(1)

Note
1. Screw steamship 4th class or steam flotilla vessel, call sign GQKH, on stocks at navy yard at Amsterdam, Netherlands 1 May 1858, launched 26 June 1859, commissioned 16 April 1860, guard ship at Vlissingen >1874<, docked at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands 19-30 November 1861, 8-12 August 1863, 18-25 November 1864, 22-23 September 1865, 12-15 May 1868, 17-21 September 1869, 30 June-7 July 1870 and 7 August-2 September 1874, 12 November wreck sold? and on 30 November was the dock available, building costs ƒ 200.265,39½, dimensions 34,60 x 7,40 x 3,20 metres (Vermeulen) according to Obreen 30,00 (loadline between perpendiculars excluded 2,60 between aft perpendicular aft front rudder) x 7,00 (loadline) x 2,40 (Dutch waters)-3,20 (Dutch East Indies) x 3,40 (hold below main deck) metres, 383 tons displacement, tonnage 230 (in 1874) tons, coal bunker capacity 25 ton or 3 days full speed, her armament consisted of 4 rifled 12cm guns, horsepower 60 hp, maximum speed under steam 5 miles and a crew numbering 50 men.

Dutch screw steamship 1st class Zr. Ms. Evertsen arrived at Plymouth, England according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated 26 May 1860

Model Rijksmuseum Amsterdam, Netherlands. Original url


An item reported that the Dutch steam frigate Zr. Ms. Evertsen captain H. Wipff arrived in the morning of the 23rd at Plymouth, England. Everything was well on board.(1)

Note
1. Screw steamship 1st class, call sign GRDC, wood-built, laid down at the navy yard at Vlissingen, Netherlands 28 February 1856, launched 31 July 1859, stricken 1874, guard ship at Batavia, Dutch East Indies 1875, decommissioned 8 December 1883, towed half January 1884 towards the roads of Surabaya, Dutch East Indies, sold on an auction for ƒ 20.600,00 to the Arab Sai Agil bin Hijdroes to be broken up in the morning of 15th March 1884, dimensions 63,5 x 15,7 x 6,7 metres, displacement 3.300 tons, horsepower 400 hp, speed 8 miles, a crew numbering 500 men and an armament of 4 (as guard ship 1-15cm, 3-12cm guns)-51 guns (consisting of 1 long 60pd gun, 30-long 30pd guns, 12-20” grenade guns and 8 rifled 16cm guns).

Dutch navy yard at Nieuwediep, Netherlands further increased according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated 26 May 1860

An item reported that the intention was to increase the navy yard at Nieuwediep, Netherlands with another two towing slips and a boiler plant. For the boiler plant was already personnel employed.

Etat-major of Dutch transport Zr. Ms. Heldin partly replaced according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated 26 May 1860

An item reported that on board of the Dutch transport Zr. Ms. Heldin lieutenant 1st class A. Jarman was appointed as 1st officer and lieutenant 2nd class W.J.S. de Kanter on 1 June replaced by R.J.A. Bouricious.(1)

Note
1. One-deck flush-decked corvette, call sign GQKL, laid down at the navy yard at Vlissingen, Netherlands 31 July 1839 by C. Soetermeer/A.E. Tromp, launched 26 May 1842, docked at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands 20-28 September 1854 and 15 December 1856-12 April 1858, store ship for projectiles in the harbour of Nieuwediep, Netherlands, training battery until 30 November 1907, accommodation ship for the Hr.Ms. Marnix 1908, accommodation for the ‘vuurwerkmakerij’ with materials transferred from Vlissingen, Netherlands towards Willemsoord, Netherlands January 1915, displacement 775 tons and as dimensions 36,5 (between perpendiculars) x 10,00 (inner hull) x 4,25 (fore)-4,82 (aft) x 5,39 (hold below main deck) and an original armament of 20-12pd guns or 20-30pd carronades, 8-12pd carronades and 2-6pd guns, later reduced to 10 guns (included 12cm guns). Figurehead female torso in roman armour decorated with ribbons.

Royal Netherlands Navy seriously lacking sufficient number of sailors according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated 22 May 1860

Zr. Ms. Bromo

Model Bromo Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, Netherlands. Original url

An item reported that the Royal Netherlands Navy again was lacking enough personnel. To crew the steam frigate Zr. Ms. Zeeland (1) were sailors from all guard ships collected in such a manner that the crews of the same guard ships numbered such low numbers that it was hardly possible to maintain the ships. Lacking sailors was also the reason that the steamship Zr. Ms. Bromo (2) could not be commissioned that year.

Notes
1. Screw steamship 1st class, call sign GRDC, wood-built, laid down at the navy yard at Vlissingen, Netherlands 28 February 1856, launched 31 July 1859, stricken 1874, guard ship at Batavia, Dutch East Indies 1875, decommissioned 8 December 1883, towed half January 1884 towards the roads of Surabaya, Dutch East Indies, sold on an auction for ƒ 20.600,00 to the Arab Sai Agil bin Hijdroes to be broken up in the morning of 15th March 1884, dimensions 63,5 x 15,7 x 6,7 metres, displacement 3.300 tons, horsepower 400 hp, speed 8 miles, a crew numbering 500 men and an armament of 4 (as guard ship 1-15cm, 3-12cm guns)-51 guns (consisting of 1 long 60pd gun, 30-long 30pd guns, 12-20” grenade guns and 8 rifled 16cm guns).
2. Bromo, paddle steamship 2nd class, call sign GQDS, laid down at the navy yard at Rotterdam, Netherlands by C.J. Glavimans on 18 November 1840, launched on 4 May 1842, stricken in 1871, displacement 546 tons dimensions 52,00 (waterline) x 10,00 (inner hull) x 4,4 (fore)-4,80 (aft) x 6,03 (depth) on metres, building costs ƒ 508.960.00. 1 funnel, 3 masts, a horsepower of 220 hp and an armament of 8 guns.

Dutch transport Zr. Ms. Heldin bound for the Mediterranean according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated 22 May 1860

An item dated Middelburg, Netherlands 21st reported that the Dutch transport Zr. Ms. Heldin probably in begin June would depart towards the Mediterranean with victuals for the Dutch squadron there. Her first officer was dismissed, officer of administration 3rd class A.L. Thierens replaced by officer of administration 2nd class A.C. Ruighart and the etat major increased with lieutenant 2nd class jhr. T.E. de Brauw.(1)

Note
1. one-deck flush-decked corvette, call sign GQKL, laid down at the navy yard at Vlissingen, Netherlands 31 July 1839 by C. Soetermeer/A.E. Tromp, launched 26 May 1842, docked at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands 20-28 September 1854 and 15 December 1856-12 April 1858, store ship for projectiles in the harbour of Nieuwediep, Netherlands, training battery until 30 November 1907, accommodation ship for the Hr.Ms. Marnix 1908, accommodation for the ‘vuurwerkmakerij’ with materials transferred from Vlissingen, Netherlands towards Willemsoord, Netherlands January 1915, displacement 775 tons and as dimensions 36,5 (between perpendiculars) x 10,00 (inner hull) x 4,25 (fore)-4,82 (aft) x 5,39 (hold below main deck) and an original armament of 20-12pd guns or 20-30pd carronades, 8-12pd carronades and 2-6pd guns, later reduced to 10 guns (included 12cm guns). Figurehead female torso in roman armour decorated with ribbons.

Dutch screw steamships Zr. Ms. Admiraal van Wassenaar and Evertsen arrived at Lisbon, Portugal according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated 22 May 1860

Admirral van Wassenaar as training ship at Amsterdam, Netherlands

Model NG-MC-104 half stern Amiraal van Wassebaar, Rijksmuseum Amsterdam Netherlands. Original url

.Model Evertsen Rijksmuseum Amsterdam, Netherlands. Original url

Evertsen 

An item dated Middelburg, Netherlands 21st reported that the Dutch steam frigates Zr. Ms. Admiraal van Wassenaer (1) and Evertsen (2) arrived in the roads of Lisbon, Portugal on the 9th.

Notes
1. Call sign GQBE, wood-built, laid down at the navy yard at Amsterdam, Netherlands as the 74 gun ship of the line Piet Hein on 15 February 1833, disassembled 1850, laid down as a screw steam frigate designed by A.E. Tromp in 1853, launched as the Admiraal van Wassenaar on 6 September1856, commissioned on 16 July 1857, converted into a training ship at the navy yard of Amsterdam 1875, commissioned for training boys and ordinary seaman 11 April 1876, until 1 January 1913 used as training and guard ship at Amsterdam and sold on 28 May at Amsterdam for ƒ 37.781,00 to be broken up, displacement 3.650 tons, dimensions 62,36 (between perpendiculars)-72,86 (over all) x 15,72 x 6,80 metres, horsepower 300 hp, speed maximum 10,67 miles, armament 8 (4 medium 30pd guns, 4-12cm guns, 1877: long 12pd guns)-45 guns and a crew numbering 450 men. On 1 October 1876 were 335 boys trained divided over 4 groups, the youngest (group 1) numbered 108 boys, groups no.2-4 respectively 103, 60 and 64.
2. Call sign GQJK. Laid down at the navy yard at Vlissingen, Netherlands on 16 October 1854, launched, on Monday 21 September 1857, destined for training sea militia 1 May 1877, decommissioned on 15 November 1881, at the navy yard at Willemsoord, Netherlands engines and boilers removed, renamed Neptunus on 11 March 1893, used as accommodation for army personnel September 1914, stricken in 1921. Wood-built. With a displacement of 3.300 ton were her dimensions 63,50 x 15,70 x 6,80 metres. The horsepower of 400 hp allowed a speed of 8 knots. Her crew numbered 500 men. The original armament consisted of 51 guns (1 long 60pd gun, 42 long 30pd guns and 8 rifled 16cm guns) and in 1882 into 4-12cm guns, 8-7,5cm guns and 2-3,7cm guns. Her design of the stern including screw shaft entrance was altered despite protests of the engineers resulting in severe vibrations. The Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated 17 September 1877 reported the intended launching on Saturday 19th between 13.00-14.00 o’clock. The minister of navy was expected to arrival on Friday to attend her launching. She was called a frigate with steam power. The edition of the 22nd reported however that the launching failed when the ship stocked after just 1/3 or ¼ of the slip. Despite all efforts which continued into the evening to remove the obstacles which prevent the further launching process did men not succeeded in doing so. The next day [=Sunday] was the whole day worked to get everything well. She was according to the Nederlandsche Staatscourant dated the 23rd finally launched on Monday 21st.

Dutch screw steamship 1st class Zr.Ms. Zeeland underway from the Netherlands towards Portugal according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated 22 May 1860

An item dated Middelburg, Netherlands 21th reported that the Dutch steam frigate Zr. Ms. Zeeland (1) captain H. Wipff left that morning the roads of Vlissingen, Netherlands towards Lisbon, Portugal.

Note
1. Screw steamship 1st class, call sign GRDC, wood-built, laid down at the navy yard at Vlissingen, Netherlands 28 February 1856, launched 31 July 1859, stricken 1874, guard ship at Batavia, Dutch East Indies 1875, decommissioned 8 December 1883, towed half January 1884 towards the roads of Surabaya, Dutch East Indies, sold on an auction for ƒ 20.600,00 to the Arab Sai Agil bin Hijdroes to be broken up in the morning of 15th March 1884, dimensions 63,5 x 15,7 x 6,7 metres, displacement 3.300 tons, horsepower 400 hp, speed 8 miles, a crew numbering 500 men and an armament of 4 (as guard ship 1-15cm, 3-12cm guns)-51 guns (consisting of 1 long 60pd gun, 30-long 30pd guns, 12-20” grenade guns and 8 rifled 16cm guns).

Dutch transport Zr. Ms. Heldin returned from Bonaire in the Netherlands according to the Dutch newspaper Middelbursche Courant dated 12 May 1860

An item reported that the Dutch transport Zr. Ms. Heldin arrived on the 8th in the roads of Texel, Netherlands returning from Bonaire. Her etat major consisted of lieutenant 1st class P. Toutenhoofd, commanding officer, lieutenant H.B. Kip, 1st officer, lieutenants 2nd class M.O. de Kanter, A.J. Cosijn, J.J. Lefebre de Montigny and jhr. T.E. de Brauw, officer of health 3rd class L.P. Vlaanderen, officer of administration 3rd class A.L. Thierens, shipping clerk C.A.E. Masman and midshipmen 1st class jhr. W.M. de Gyselaar and Q. Hoeufft.(1)

Note
1. Oone-deck flush-decked corvette, call sign GQKL, laid down at the navy yard at Vlissingen, Netherlands 31 July 1839 by C. Soetermeer/A.E. Tromp, launched 26 May 1842, docked at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands 20-28 September 1854 and 15 December 1856-12 April 1858, store ship for projectiles in the harbour of Nieuwediep, Netherlands, training battery until 30 November 1907, accommodation ship for the Hr.Ms. Marnix 1908, accommodation for the ‘vuurwerkmakerij’ with materials transferred from Vlissingen, Netherlands towards Willemsoord, Netherlands January 1915, displacement 775 tons and as dimensions 36,5 (between perpendiculars) x 10,00 (inner hull) x 4,25 (fore)-4,82 (aft) x 5,39 (hold below main deck) and an original armament of 20-12pd guns or 20-30pd carronades, 8-12pd carronades and 2-6pd guns, later reduced to 10 guns (included 12cm guns). Figurehead female torso in roman armour decorated with ribbons.

Dutch steam frigate Zr. Ms. Admiraal van Wassenaer repaired at Cherbourg, France according to the Dutch newspaper Midelburgsche Courant dated 3 January 1860

As training ship at Amsterdam, Netherlands

Model NG-MC-104 half stern Rijksmuseum Amsterdam Netherlands. Original url

An item referred to a tiding from Cherbourg, France reporting that everything was well on board of the Dutch steam frigate Zr. Ms. Wassenaer.(1) She left on the 16th the roads towards the dock where she was to be repaired, estimated time needed for repairs 14 days.

Note
1. Call sign GQBE, wood-built, laid down at the navy yard at Amsterdam, Netherlands as the 74 gun ship of the line Piet Hein on 15 February 1833, disassembled 1850, laid down as a screw steam frigate designed by A.E. Tromp in 1853, launched as the Admiraal van Wassenaar on 6 September1856, commissioned on 16 July 1857, converted into a training ship at the navy yard of Amsterdam 1875, commissioned for training boys and ordinary seaman 11 April 1876, until 1 January 1913 used as training and guard ship at Amsterdam and sold on 28 May at Amsterdam for ƒ 37.781,00 to be broken up, displacement 3.650 tons, dimensions 62,36 (between perpendiculars)-72,86 (over all) x 15,72 x 6,80 metres, horsepower 300 hp, speed maximum 10,67 miles, armament 8 (4 medium 30pd guns, 4-12cm guns, 1877: long 12pd guns)-45 guns and a crew numbering 450 men. On 1 October 1876 were 335 boys trained divided over 4 groups, the youngest (group 1) numbered 108 boys, groups no.2-4 respectively 103, 60 and 64.

Hundreds of Dutch light sailors sent to the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Midelburgsche Courant dated 3 January 1860

An item reported that more as 300 light sailors on board of several Dutch guard ships on short notice were to be transported with merchant shipping towards the Dutch East Indies and there divided over the several warships.

Dutch transport Zr. Ms. Heldin arrived at Lisbon, Portugal according to the Dutch newspaper Midelburgsche Courant dated 3 January 1860

An item reported that the Dutch transport Zr. Ms. Heldin lieutenant 1st class P. Toutenhoofd after a voyage of 6,5 days coming from the roads of Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands arrived on 15 December 1859 at Lisbon, Portugal.(1)

Note
1. One-deck flush-decked corvette, call sign GQKL, laid down at the navy yard at Vlissingen, Netherlands 31 July 1839 by C. Soetermeer/A.E. Tromp, launched 26 May 1842, docked at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands 20-28 September 1854 and 15 December 1856-12 April 1858, store ship for projectiles in the harbour of Nieuwediep, Netherlands, training battery until 30 November 1907, accommodation ship for the Hr.Ms. Marnix 1908, accommodation for the ‘vuurwerkmakerij’ with materials transferred from Vlissingen, Netherlands towards Willemsoord, Netherlands January 1915, displacement 775 tons and as dimensions 36,5 (between perpendiculars) x 10,00 (inner hull) x 4,25 (fore)-4,82 (aft) x 5,39 (hold below main deck) and an original armament of 20-12pd guns or 20-30pd carronades, 8-12pd carronades and 2-6pd guns, later reduced to 10 guns (included 12cm guns). Figurehead female torso in roman armour decorated with ribbons.

Dutch paddle steamship 2nd class Zr. Ms. Cycloop bound for Constantinople, Turkey according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated 11 September 1860


Model NG-MC-480Rijksmuseum Amsterdam, Netherlands. Original url

An item reported that the Dutch steamship Zr. Ms. Cycloop was to depart on the 16th towards Constantinople, Turkey. Her etat major consisted of captain lieutenant F.R. Toe Water (commanding officer), lieutenant 1st class A.A. ‘s Graeuwen (1st officer), lieutenants 2nd class P. Swaan, C.H. Bogaert and J.A. Waldeck, officer of health 3rd class A.M. Grondhout, officer of administration 2nd class W.C. Oliver and shipping clerk H.K.J. van den Bussche.(1)

Note
1. Paddle steamship 2nd/3rd class, call sign GQHB, on stocks at navy yard at Vlissingen, Netherlands by A.E. Tromp on 23 July 1840, commissioned on 1 June 1843, launched on 13 June, refitted to be used as transport for royalties in 1845, docked at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands 11-14 September 1850, 13-February-2 September and 15 November-1 December 1856 and 29 July-1 August 1861, transferred to the Indische Militaire Marine in 1867, condemned and stricken 1873, dimensions 47,00 (on load lone between perpendiculars) x 8,95 (inner hull) x 3,5 (medium) x 5,36 (hold amidships to main deck) metres, 875 tons displacement, 2 masts,1 funnel, 6 guns (consisting of 1-20cm grenade gun, 1 rifled 16cm gun, 4-30 pd carronades, according to Obreen in wartime 2-20“grenade guns, 4 medium 30pd guns, in peace time 2 long 30pd guns, 2-medium 30pd guns and 10-1pd swivels)), 220 hp horsepower and a crew numbering 90-100 men.

Dutch transport Zr. Ms. Heldin underway from England towards Egypt according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated 11 September 1860

An item reported that the Dutch transport Zr. Ms. Heldin lieutenant 1st class P. Toutenhoofd departed on the 3rd Plymouth, England bound for Alexandria, Egypt.(1)

Note
1. One-deck flush-decked corvette, call sign GQKL, laid down at the navy yard at Vlissingen, Netherlands 31 July 1839 by C. Soetermeer/A.E. Tromp, launched 26 May 1842, docked at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands 20-28 September 1854 and 15 December 1856-12 April 1858, store ship for projectiles in the harbour of Nieuwediep, Netherlands, training battery until 30 November 1907, accommodation ship for the Hr.Ms. Marnix 1908, accommodation for the ‘vuurwerkmakerij’ with materials transferred from Vlissingen, Netherlands towards Willemsoord, Netherlands January 1915, displacement 775 tons and as dimensions 36,5 (between perpendiculars) x 10,00 (inner hull) x 4,25 (fore)-4,82 (aft) x 5,39 (hold below main deck) and an original armament of 20-12pd guns or 20-30pd carronades, 8-12pd carronades and 2-6pd guns, later reduced to 10 guns (included 12cm guns). Figurehead female torso in roman armour decorated with ribbons.

Tuesday, 24 May 2016

Dutch former screw steamship 1st class Hr. Ms. Van Speijk (1880-1943) as accommodation ship at Den Helder, Netherlands

Noord-Hollands Archief NL-HlmNHA_162_2519_1775. Source

Screw steamship 1st class, also called frigate, Call sign GRBK, on stocks at the naval yard at Amsterdam, Netherlands on 9 February 1880, launched on 7 June 1882, commissioned on 1 March 1887, decommissioned on 6 September 1897 and stricken, converted into accommodation ship for the shipyard division at Den Helder, Netherlands in 1904, transferred from Den Helder to the Coenhaven, Amsterdam, Netherlands in 1942 and sold to be broken up at Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht begin March 1946. Displacement 3.575 ton, horsepower 2.891 hp, speed 14,25 miles, her crew numbered 280 men and an armament of 6-17cm guns, 8-12cm guns. Iron-built and wood-planked. The engines and boilers were manufactured by the Koninklijke Fabriek van Stoom- en andere werktuigen te Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Dutch flying boat Dornier Wal Do-41 1931-1942

NL-HlmNHA_162_2519_1739. Source

In service of the Royal Netherlands Navy in the Dutch East Indies between 25 August 1931-3 February 1942. Built by Aviolanda, Papendrecht, Netherlands.

Japanese despatch vessel Yodoi (1907) in 1923

Launched in 1907, completed in 1908, displacement 1.250 tons, horsepower 6.500 hp, coal-oil fired reciprocating machinery and an armament of 2-4.7” guns, 4-12pd guns and 2 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

Japanese gunboat Saga (1912) in 1923

Launched and completed in 1913, displacement 785 tons, horsepower 1.600 hp, coal-fired reciprocating machinery and an armament of 1-4.7” guns, 2-12pd guns and 1 machinegun.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

Japanese gunboat Uji 1903) in 1923

Launched and completed in 1923, 620 tons displacement, horsepower 1.000 hp, coal-fired reciprocating machinery and an armament of 4-12pd guns and 3 machineguns.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

Japanese despatch vessel Mogami (1908) in 1923

Launched in 1908, completed in 1909, displacement 1.350 tons, horsepower 8.000 hp, coal-oil fired turbine direct drive machinery and an armament of 2-4.7” guns, 4-12pd guns and 2 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

American gunboat USS Tulsa in 1923

Being built. Displacement 1.575 tons and an armament of 3-4” guns, 2-3” field guns, 2-3pd guns and 4 machineguns.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

American gunboat USS Wilmette (1903) in 1923

Completed in 1923, displacement 1.961 tons, horsepower 460 hp, coal-fired reciprocating machinery and an armament of 1-4” gun and 1-3pd gun.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

American gunboat USS Asheville (1918) in 1923

Launched in 1918, completed in 1920, displacement 15.75 tons, horsepower 800 hp and an armament of 2-4” guns and 8 smaller guns.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

Gunboat USS Paducah (1904) in 1923

Launched in 1904, completed in 1905, displacement 1.085 tons, horsepower 1.000 hp, coal-fired reciprocating machinery and an armament of 1-4” guns and 1-3” gun.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

American gunboat USS Sacramento (1914) in 1923

Launched and completed in 1914, displacement 1.425 ton, horsepower 950 hp, coal-fired reciprocating machinery and an armament of 3-4” guns and 4 smaller guns.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

German Kaiser-class battleships to be fitted out with 35,5cm guns according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1911-1912 no. 3

Kaiser-class

An item reported that the newest German battleships of 1910-1911 (the Ersatz Hagen and so on) were to be armed with 35,5cm guns. This meant again an increase of the calibre while there were hardly any references more that the main armament of the Helgoland-design battleships was to consist of 31cm L/45 guns.(1)

Note
1. Ersatz Hagen was the SMS Kaiserin of the Kaiser-class, laid down at the Howaldtswerke, Kiel, Germany in November 1910, launched on 11 November 1911. Commissioned on 14 May 1913, scuttled in the Gutter Sound, Scapa Flow, Orkney Island on 21 June 1919 and raised and broken up in 1936.

Dutch paddle steamship Zr. Ms. Bromo visited England underway towards the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Vlissingse Courant dated 10 June 1875

Model Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, Netherlands. Original url

Bromo

An item reported that the Dutch paddle steamship Zr. Ms. Bromo (1) captain lieutenant W.J. Scholten van Aschat arrived on the 11th at Plymouth, England with the intention to depart the next day towards Achin, Dutch East Indies. Everything was well on board.

Note
1. Paddle steamship 2nd class, call sign GQDF, iron-built with wood-planked, rigged but very worse sail performance, on stocks at the shipyard of the Kon. Fabriek etc., Amsterdam, Netherlands in 1873, launched in 1874, engines and boilers repaired in 1877, temporarily guard ship at Batavia, Dutch East Indies 27 August-13 November 1883, decommissioned 15 March 1890, needed major repaired and at the same time fitted out as guard ship at Batavia, commissioned as guard ship at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies as replacement of the Surabaya on 1 April 1892, decommissioned and replaced by the Koning der Nederlanden on 1 December 1899, used as store ship for the army during South Celebes-expedition in 1905, fitted out as coal hulk and serving at Merauke in 1910, stricken in in 1914, towed from Merauke towards Surabaya in 1916, sold there in November 1917, dimensions 60 (between perpendiculars) x 9,39-16,17 (over side wheels) x 4 metre, horsepower 200 nhp/950 ehp, an armament of 2 rifled 16cm guns and 4-12cm guns, and a crew numbering 100-134 men (1885: 101 Europeans, 33 natives).

US Navy testing Shearer motor torpedo boat according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1920 no. 6

An item referred to the magazine Schiffbau reporting that on short notice the US Navy tests were to be executed with the Shearer motor torpedo boat. Displacement 8-10 (holds filled) tons and as dimensions 17,7 x 2,9 metres. Armament 3 torpedoes and 5 depth charge launchers. Speed 20 (with filled holds)-30 miles. Two engines. Range 1.000 (slow)-600 (half power)-350 (full speed) miles. The hull was divided into watertight compartments and to decrease the freeboard with 50% was it possible to fill the torpedo holds with water. The building costs were quite low. In peacetime to be used as motor launch while it was no problem to lift them on board of battleships.

French expert supporter of smaller destroyers according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1920 no. 6

An item referred to the magazines Journal del la Marine and le Yacht reporting that was better to retain the 1.000 ton destroyers design in stead of building in 1919 the proposed 1.800-2.000 ton destroyers. The original author claimed that during the First World War served perfect if used as guard vessel, aviso and minesweeper and especially as escort vessel against submarines. He thought that the 1.000 ton destroyer was an excellent design for this tasks. Serving as torpedo boat were the destroyers just disappointing. The necessary increase of the displacement to maintain higher speed, personnel accommodation desires and seagoing qualities resulted that they became better visible due to their larger size decreasing a possible successful attack. The American, British and Italian navies decided for these reasons to built small fast motor vessels to serve as torpedo boat and as anti submarine warfare vessels.

British destroyers making smoke screens in peace time according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1920 no. 6

An item reported that British destroyers also in peacetime were to fitted out with so-called smoke floats to make during exercises smoke screens.

Dutch paddle steamship Zr. Ms. Bromo and Merapi according to the Dutch newspaper Vlissingse Courant dated 28 February 1875

Zr. Ms. Bromo

Model Bromo/Merapi, Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, Netherlands. Original url

An item referred to a decision of the crown dated 24th dealing with the commissioning of the Dutch paddle steamship Zr. Ms. Bromo (1) and Merapi (2), lying respectively at Amsterdam, Netherlands and Fijenoord, Rotterdam, Netherlands on 16 March 1875 with as destination the Dutch East Indies and with as commanding officers respectively captain lieutenants W.J. Scholten van Asch and J. Tromp.

Note
1. Paddle steamship 2nd class, call sign GQDF, iron-built with wood-planked, rigged but very worse sail performance, on stocks at the shipyard of the Kon. Fabriek etc., Amsterdam, Netherlands in 1873, launched in 1874, engines and boilers repaired in 1877, temporarily guard ship at Batavia, Dutch East Indies 27 August-13 November 1883, decommissioned 15 March 1890, needed major repaired and at the same time fitted out as guard ship at Batavia, commissioned as guard ship at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies as replacement of the Surabaya on 1 April 1892, decommissioned and replaced by the Koning der Nederlanden on 1 December 1899, used as store ship for the army during South Celebes-expedition in 1905, fitted out as coal hulk and serving at Merauke in 1910, stricken in in 1914, towed from Merauke towards Surabaya in 1916, sold there in November 1917, dimensions 60 (between perpendiculars) x 9,39-16,17 (over side wheels) x 4 metre, horsepower 200 nhp/950 ehp, an armament of 2 rifled 16cm guns and 4-12cm guns, and a crew numbering 100-134 men (1885: 101 Europeans, 33 natives).
2. Paddle steamship 2nd class, call sign GQNP,on stocks at the shipyard Ned. Stoomboot Mij. Fijenoord, Rotterdam for account of the department of Colonies with yard number 89 in 1873, launched on 8 or 9 October 1874, composite built (iron with zinc, earlier with wood planked), commissioned on 1 June 1875, departed Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands via Suez towards the Dutch East Indies on 5 June 1875, anchored in the roads of Atjeh, Dutch East Indies on 16 August 1875, decommissioned on 1 October 1896, condemned and sold for ƒ 13.125,00, displacement 1.352 tons, dimensions 65,56 x 9,36 x 4,1 metres. Horsepower 950 ehp., armament 6-10 guns (in advance 2 rifled 16cm, 4-12cm, later added 2-7,5cm, 2-3,7cm) and a crew numbering 140 men (103 Europeans, 37 natives). Rigged, but very worse sailing performances. Was one of the heaviest ships of the Indies Military Navy.

Dutch warships Zr. Ms. Cornelis Dirks, Leeuwarden and Prinses Maria in the West Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Vlissingse Courant dated 28 February 1875

An item reported that the Dutch division commanded by captain jhr. J.H. van Capellen arrived on 11th January 1875 at Martinique, departing day later to Guadeloupe, from there to St. Eustatius and St. Martin, visiting on the 21st St. Thomas with the intention to depart on the 24th towards Curaçao. The division consisted of the screw steamships Zr. Ms. Leeuwarden (1), flagship, Zr. Ms. Cornelis Dirks (2) captain lieutenant J.B.A. de Josselin de Jongh and Zr. Ms. Prinses Maria (3) captain lieutenant H. van Goens.

Notes
1. Screw steamship 1st class, call sign GQMN, on stocks at the navy yard at Vlissingen, Netherlands, Netherlands on 6 December 1859, launched on Saturday 13.30 o’clock 19 October 1861, condemned  1886, decommissioned on 20 September 1885 and sold at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies for ƒ 26.050 on 23 January 1886, dimensions 58,00-62,84 (over all) x 12,25 x 5,50 metres, 2.030 tons displacement, an armament of 10 guns (10 rifled 16cm guns, 1881: 6-12cm guns, 4 rifled 16cm guns), a crew numbering 212-225 men, 8,5 knots speed and 250 hp horsepower.
2. Screw steamship 3rd class, call sign GQFS, on stocks at the shipyard of K. Smit jr, Krimpen aan de Lek, Netherlands 1 May 1858, launched 11 January 1859, docked at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands 23-26 July 1859, 23-27 August 1860, 23 October-8 November 1862, 30 October-4 November 1863, 17 July 1868-7 March 1871, 5-14 June 1872, 11-14 June 1873, 17-19 June 1874, 20-30 October 1874, condemned for service abroad in October 1880, stricken 1881, dimensions 43,00 x 9,20 x 4,30 metres, 759 tons displacement, 6 guns, 100 men, 119nph/250epk horsepower and a speed of 7 knots.
3. Screw steamship 3rd class, call sign GQRN, on stocks at the navy yard at Willemsoord, Netherlands on 17 June 1858, launched on 19 November 1862, commissioned on 1 April 1864, docked at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands 7-21 April 1865, 1-14 August 1867, 28 January-19 March 1868, 27 August-1 September 1869, 10-21 July 1871, 12 March-3 May 1872 and 2-9 September 1874, condemned 1880 and sold, building costs ƒ 349.018,72

Royal British Navy testing 38,1cm guns for battleships according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1911-1912 no. 3

An item referred to the magazine le Yacht reporting that in England 38,1cm/15” guns were tested to be used of the battleships to be built next year. Despite the real calibre were the guns described as 13.5”. Further more were 7,6cm automatic Maxim guns mentioned, which seemed beyond the truth while for anti torpedo boat guns already larger calibres were available. A German magazine mentioned for instance automatic 10,5cm Krupp guns.

Monday, 23 May 2016

Dutch town archive Vlissingen presents unique 19th theoretical naval shipbuilding book on line


Between 1876-1880 wrote Bruno Joannes Tideman (1834-1883), Dutch naval chief engineer and advisor of the minister of navy his magnum opus titled Memoriaal van de Marine. Tideman educated at the navy yard at Vlissingen, Netherlands was experienced in practice and theoretical shipbuilding, involved in transformed wood-built sailing ships into (armoured) floating batteries, the building of the first Dutch ironclads and scientific research dealing with the shape of the hull and water resistance. The navy yard at Vlissingen, Netherlands was despite her short existence probably the most important Dutch navy yard in the first half of the 19th Century. Further more he advices the Dutch king to establish a navy yard at steel plant at Vlissingen. In 1875 was this yard realized, which became known as the Kon. Mij. De Schelde nowadays still existing as part of the Damen concern. As Damen Schelde Naval Shipbuilding she is still responsible for building and designing warships.

Inner harbour Rotterdam, Netherlands 23 December 2012



Den Helder, Netherlands 13 August 2004


Screw steamship 4th class Bonaire in dry dock at former navy yard Den Helder, Netherlands 2014

In his book Tideman supplies details about the warships at that moment serving in the Royal Netherlands Navy like ironclads, monitors, gunboats (of the British Staunch-design) and screw steamships. Details about building costs, the used materials, and so on and so on. There are numerous drawings of ships but also of launches and pulleys.

Of the ships mentioned and described are nowadays at least three still existing, namely the ram turrets Buffel and Schorpioen and the composite built screw steamship Bonaire.

The town archive of Vlissingen made it possible for anybody interested in maritime history world wide to download pages of the book without any further costs. For more details about Tideman FOLLOW THE LINK

The book can be find on  FOLLOW THE LINK 

The text is written in Dutch but follow the next instruction. At the left side you can see the text: 536 Memoriaal van de Marine- Kenmerken- Inventaris. If you push the text Inventaris you will able to read the book and if desired download individual pages.

Russian large landing ships Project 775 Ropucha I-III 1974-







Minsk. Naval Days Den Helder, Netherlands 30 June 2011

Kaliningrad. Naval Days Den Helder, Netherlands 7 July 2012

Kaliningrad

Consisted of the Ropucha I, II and III called by the NATO Ropucha and Ropucha II.
Of the Project 775-I were totally 12 units built at the Stocznia Polnoc Shipyard, Gdansk, Poland built between 1974-1979 namely the SDK 47-48,55 (Alexandr Otrakovsiy), 63, 90, 91 (Olegorskiy gornyak), 119, 181, 182 (Kondopoga), 183 (Kotlas), 197 and 200.
Of the Project 775-II were totally 13 units built at the Stocznia Polnoc Shipyard, Gdansk, Poland built between 1981-1988 with as names BDK 14, 32, 43 (Minsk), 45 Georgiy Pobedonosets), 46 (Novoxherkassk), 56, (Konstantin Olshanskiy), 58 (Kaliningrad), 60 (Alexandr Shabalin), 64 (Tsezar Kunikov), 67 (Yamal), 98 (Admiral Nevelskoy), 101 (Oslyabya) and 105
Of the Project 775-III were totally 13 units built at the Stocznia Polnoc Shipyard, Gdansk, Poland built between 1990-1991 with as names BDK 11 Peresvet), 54 (Azov) and 61 (Korolev).
Displacement 2.768 (standard)-4.012 (full load) tons and as dimensions 112,5 (I-II)-112,63 (III) x 15,01 x 4,26 metres. The 2x9.600hp Zgoda-Sulzer 16ZVB40/48 diesels allowed a speed of 17,59 knots and a varying between 3.400 (with 18 knots)-4.000 (with 12 knots) nautical miles. Crew numbered 17 officers and 81 sailors. The 775/I-II were at least armed with 2x2-5,7cm AK-725’s and the 775-III at least with 1-7,6xm AK-176 M and 2x6 barrels 3cm AK-630M’s. Transport capacity 10 main battle tanks+340 military/12 BTR+340 military/3 main battle tanks+3 2S69 Nona-S+5 MT-LB+4 army trucks+313 military/500 tons cargo.