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Tuesday, 7 February 2023

British fast minelayer HMS Latona (M76) 1939-1941

Based on German Second World War drawing

Part of Abdiel or Manxman-class fast minelayers 1938 group. Laid down by John I. Thornycroft&Company, Woolston, England on 4 April 1939, launched on 20 August 1940, commissioned on 4 May 1941 and lost after being damaged in a German air attack north of Bardia, Libya on 25 October 1941.

Displacement 2,650 (standard)-3,415 (full load) tons and as dimensions 122.07 (between perpendiculars)-127.0 (over all) x 12 x 3.43-4.50 (full load) metres or 400.6-418 x 40 x 11.3-14.9 feet. Propulsion consisted Parsons geared steam turbines and 4 Admiralty 3-drum water tube boilers supplying via 2 shafts 72,000 shp allowing a speed of 38 (full load)-40 (normal) knots and a range of 1,000 nautical miles.38 knots. Crew numbered 242 men. Armament 3x2-10cm/4” Mark XVI guns, 4x1-4cm/2pd MK VIII quick firing guns, 2x4-12.7mm/0.50” Vickers machine guns (later 12x1 and 2-2cm Oerlikon cannons and 156 mines. 

Enemy surface raiders operating on the South Atlantic Ocean according to the U.S. Joint Intelligence Committee. Daily summary dated 10 August 1942

An item reported that an enemy surface raider was sighted by daylight on 9 August about midway between St. Helena and Rio de Janeiro. She was not identified. In the South Atlantic seemed to surface raiders to be active.

Source

Map Room Papers (Roosevelt Administration), 1942 - 1945. U.S. Joint Intelligence Committee. Daily summary No. 243 dated 10 August 1942

Allied Trans-Atlantic continuous attacked by enemy submarines according to the U.S. Joint Intelligence Committee. Daily summary dated 10 August 1942

An item reported that a fourth freighter of the Trans-Atlantic convoy mentioned in the summary of 9 August was sunk by an enemy submarine. The four ships and the damaged one were on 9 August by daylight attacked by minimum 2 submarines probably when the visibility conditions were low. A corvette escorting the convoy managed to ram and sunk one of the two sighted submarines. This eastbound convoy was earlier attacked on 5 August and followed by the submarines since according to the summaries Nos. 239-250. The attacks in the nights of 7-8 and 8-9 August were fruitless. The convoy lost 6 ships and the enemy two submarines which were rammed by the escorting warships. The number of locations of the enemy submarines in the western part of the Atlantic theater seemed tot to have changed. The escort which sunk a submarine off Wilmington, N.S. was an anti-submarine trawler and not a corvette as mentioned in Summary No. 242.

Source

Map Room Papers (Roosevelt Administration), 1942 - 1945. U.S. Joint Intelligence Committee. Daily summary No. 243 dated 10 August 1942.

Japanese passenger-cargo ship (ex-Mifune Maru 1928-1931) Mikage Maru No. 3 1931-1942

Laid down by Kobeseikosho K.K. Harima Zosen Kojo shipyard, Aioi, Japan on 8 August 1927, launched on 24 February 1928, completed on 11 April 1928, renamed Mikage Maru No. 3 on 14 July 1931, requisitioned by the Imperial Japanese Navy on 3 September 1940 as an auxiliary transport, lost in a collision on 13 July 1942 and stricken on 10 August 1942. Gross tonnage 3,111 tons, under deck 2,775 tons, net tonnage 1,848 tons and as dimensions 331 x 47 x 7.7 (light)-21.3 (loaded) feet, Coal fuelled triple expansion steam propulsion, 1 screw, 241 nhp, coal bunker capacity 642 tons, range 6,700 nautical miles/10 knots and speed 10 (cruising)-11 (maximum) knots.

Japanese potential troop transport Korea Maru in December 1921

On 22 May 1922 (!) received the Dutch naval staff at The Hague, Netherlands from the Dutch embassy at Tokyo, Japan a detailed specification of Japanese merchant ships of minimum 1.500 tons tonnage usable for troop transport over sea on 13 December 1921. If the transport was over a short distance for instance Japan-Philippines or Japan-Chinese harbour was the transport capacity increased with 10% and on a distance within 24 hours even doubled. The figures were supplied by non-Japanese experts, partly based on the troop transports between Japan-China and Japan-Siberia. The transports were kept secret. At that moment was Japan already considered as a potential enemy. For each ship was mentioned how many troops included equipment could be transported over a longer distance, for instance to an island belonging to the Dutch East Indies. In February-March 1942 invaded Japan indeed the Dutch East Indies.

Speed 18 miles, net tonnage 6,100 tons, gross tonnage 11,809 tons, transport capacity 3,950 men and owned by T.K.K. Coal-fuelled. Passenger ship.

Source

Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 inventory number 137 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands

Japanese potential troop transport Suwa Maru in December 1921

On 22 May 1922 (!) received the Dutch naval staff at The Hague, Netherlands from the Dutch embassy at Tokyo, Japan a detailed specification of Japanese merchant ships of minimum 1.500 tons tonnage usable for troop transport over sea on 13 December 1921. If the transport was over a short distance for instance Japan-Philippines or Japan-Chinese harbour was the transport capacity increased with 10% and on a distance within 24 hours even doubled. The figures were supplied by non-Japanese experts, partly based on the troop transports between Japan-China and Japan-Siberia. The transports were kept secret. At that moment was Japan already considered as a potential enemy. For each ship was mentioned how many troops included equipment could be transported over a longer distance, for instance to an island belonging to the Dutch East Indies. In February-March 1942 invaded Japan indeed the Dutch East Indies.

Speed 15.5 miles, net tonnage 6,864 tons, gross tonnage 10,927 tons, transport capacity 3,650 men and owned by Nippon Yusen Kaisha. Coal-fuelled. Passenger ship.

Source

Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 inventory number 137 (National Archive at The Hague,

Netherlands

Pre design A Invincible-class battle cruisers 1905

Minotaur-class

Invincible-class predesign A

Invincible-class


Reciprocating propulsion. Speed 25 knots. Dimensions 540 (between perpendiculars) x 77 x 26.5 (mean) feet and a displacement of 17,000 tons. Main armament 4x2-30.5c,/12”guns.

According to the “instructions to be observed in considering the features which should be incorporated by the director of naval construction in the new designs of ships” was for the armoured cruisers a speed needed of 25 knots, an armament consisting of 12” guns and anti-torpedo craft guns but nothing between. The number of the 12” guns depended on the required speed of 25 knots and reasonable proportions. The armour had to be on similar scale of the Minotaur-class. (1) Further more was carefully  attention for the docking facilities asked.

There were several designs drawn. The armoured cruiser in contradistinction to the newly designed battleship (the HMS Dreadnought!) was to be exceptionally strong in end-on gunfire for chasing purposes in stead of broadside gun fire. However the lenth of the engine and boiler rooms combined by the great consequent distance from the centre of gravity where the turrets were mounted resulted into excessive pitching in a seaway making the desired strong end-on gunfire an issue. The alternative to decrease the number of main guns to just 6 was not accepted while the saving in weight with a reduced length was to small and the costs per gun to much increased. After a discussion choose the Committee unanimous for design E. This was an armoured cruiser with a displacement of 16,750 tons and as dimensions 540 x 79 x 26 feet. With a horsepower of 40,000 ihp was het speed to be 25 knots. The armament was to consist of 4x2-12” guns in separate guns mounted on separate redoubts, 20-12pd quick firing anti torpedo boat guns and5 submerged torpedo tubes.

In the meeting of Thursday 12 January 1905 were the effects of blast discussed and what the most ideal armament was to control this. The designs D and E were in the meantime prepared. Wooden models with moveable parts were made and which could be altered to represent the various arrangements of armament. Designs D and E differs in the disposition of the boradside turrets, D abreast eacht other and in E en enchelon. Favour of E was that the broadside turrets were each capable of firing over a certain limited training of the opposite side of the cruiser. To prevent blast was it impossible to fire on the same time on the same broadside. However was one gun turret out of action, the other one still could fire on the opposite side reducing the broadside fire less than in another disposition. The committee chose for design E but the director of naval construction (2) was asked to substitute for the foremost superstructure (design E) a long forecastle extending aft to the after turret (design E modified). This would improve the seaworthiness and give the broadside guns more command.  On Wednesday 18 January 1905 was design E unanimously adopted for recommendation to the Board and to continue with the design proces.

Notes

1. The Minotaur-class was preceded by the Warrior-class, succeeded by the Invincible-class battle cruisers. Displacement 14,800 tons and as dimensions 149.4 x 158.2 x 22.7 x 7,9 metres or 490 (between perpendiculars)-519 (over all) x 74.5 x 26 feet and a main armament of 2x2-23,4cm/9.2” guns. Described by the British historian R.A. Burt as a cruiser edition of the Lord Nelson-class battleships which had a displacement of 15,604 (normal)-18,106 (deep load) tons and as dimensions 443.6 x 79.6 x 30 feet and a main armament of 2x2-30.5 cm/12” guns. The Invincible-class succeeded by Indefatigable-class, a displacement of 17,530)-20,750 (tons) tons and as dimensions 172.8 (over all) x 23.9 x 9.1 (deep load) metres or 567 x 78.6 x 30 feet, 2 direct steam turbine sets and 31 watertube boilers and a main armament of 4x2-30.5cm/12”. First Sea Lord admiral Fisher suppported this class until 24 November 1911 called armoured cruisers and since then battlecruisers.

2. Sir Philip Watts (30 May 1846 Deptford, England-15 March 1926 Chester, London, England), director of naval construction between 1902-1912 and between 1885-1901 director of the war shipping department pf Armstrong Whitworth, Elswick. Since 1912 advisor to the Admiralty on naval construction and director of Armstrong Whitworth.

Sources

The British Library MS 48989. The Jellicoe Papers. Vol 1 (ff. 88). Report of the Committee on Designs recommending ships such as H.M.S. Dreadnought, 1905. Printed.

Warshipsresearchblogspot.com

 

Completion status of the American destroyer USS Perkins (DD-26) on 30 June 1911

Name superintending constructor L. Bankson, contract signed on 1 October 1908, expiration of contract period on 1 September 1910, lines faired on 17 October 1908, first hull material ordered on 30 October 1908, keel laid down on 22 March 1909, first frame erected on 2 April 1909, first large castings received on 23 March 1909, first large castings erected on 14 March 1909, first compartment tested on 14 September 1909, launched on 9 April 1910, dock trial 21 July 1910, official trail 26-30 September 1910, estimated degree of completion on 30 June 1911, delivered to the government on 15 November 1910 and first commissioned on 18 November 1910.

Note

1. Part of modified Paulding-class, preceded by Smith-class, succeeded by Cassin-class. Built by Newport News Shipbuilding Company, Newport News, Virginia, USA, decommissioned on 5 December 1919, stricken on 8 March 1935 and sold to be broken up on 28 June 1935.

Sources

Annual reports of the Navy Department for the fiscal year 1911. Washington, 1912. Report of Chief Bureau of Construction and Repair dated 24 October 1911. The annual fiscal year ended 30 June 1911.

Warshipsresearchblogspot.com

Completion status of the American destroyer USS Terry (DD-25) on 30 June 1911

Name superintending constructor T.G. Roberts, contract signed on 13 October 1908, expiration of contract period on 13 October 1910, lines faired on 26 September 1908, first hull material ordered on 8 October 1908, keel laid down on 8 February 1909, first frame erected on 15 February 1909, first large castings received on 8 March 1909, first large castings erected on 20 March 1909, first compartment tested on 14 July 1909, launched on 21 August 1909, dock trial 3 September 1910, official trail 19 September 1910, estimated degree of completion on 30 June 1911, delivered to the government on 12 October 1910 and first commissioned on 18 October 1910.

Note

1. Part of modified Paulding-class, preceded by Smith-class, succeeded by Cassin-class. Built by Newport News Shipbuilding Company, Newport News, Virginia, USA, decommissioned on 13 November 1919, served within the Coast Guard 1924-1930, sold to be broken up on 2 May 1934 and stricken on 28 June 1934.

Sources

Annual reports of the Navy Department for the fiscal year 1911. Washington, 1912. Report of Chief Bureau of Construction and Repair dated 24 October 1911. The annual fiscal year ended 30 June 1911.

Warshipsresearchblogspot.com

Completion status of the American destroyer USS Roe (DD-24) on 30 June 1911

Name superintending constructor T.G. Roberts, contract signed on 12 October 1908, xpiration of contract period on 13 October 1910, lines faired on26 September 1908, first hull material ordered on 8 October 1908, keel laid down on 18 January 1909, first frame erected on 5 February 1909, first large castings received on 1 March 1909, first large castings erected on 11 March 1909, first compartment tested on 15 May 1909, launched on 24 July 1909, dock trial 26 June 1910, official trail 11 July 1910, estimated degree of completion on 30 June 1911, delivered to the government on 15 September 1910 and first commissioned on 17 September 1910

Note

1. Part of modified Paulding-class, preceded by Smith-class, succeeded by Cassin-class. Built by Newport News Shipbuilding Company, Newport News, Virginia, USA, decommissioned on 1 December 1919, in service of the US Coast Guard 1924-1930, sold to be broken up on 2 May 1934 and stricken on 28 June 1934.

Sources

Annual reports of the Navy Department for the fiscal year 1911. Washington, 1912. Report of Chief Bureau of Construction and Repair dated 24 October 1911. The annual fiscal year ended 30 June 1911.

Warshipsresearchblogspot.com

Monday, 6 February 2023

German oil/chemical tanker Nabucco 2016-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 26 December 2022

Cyprus-flagged, homeport Limassol, MMSI 209219000 and call sign 5BXQ4, 2016-2018 Luxembourg-flagged, IMO 9771999, MMSI 253144000 and call sign LXNB. Built by Tersan Tersanecilik Sanayi ve Ticaret A.S. Tuzla, Turkey with yard number 1056 between 2015-2016. Owned and managed by GEFO Gesellschaft for Oeltransport mbH, Luxembourg, now GEFO Gesellschaft für Oeltransporte mbH, Hamburg, Germany. 

American whaler Peru departed to sea in 1821

Of Nantucket, master Peter Veeder, departed on 4 March 1821 to the Pacifc Ocean, returned on 26 April 1824 1.525 barrels sperm oil.

Source

Catalogue of Nantucket Whalers and their voyages from 1815 to 1870. Hussey&Robinson, Nantucket, 1876.

American whaler Equator departed to sea in 1821

Of Nantucket, master Joseph Barney, departed on 28 February 1821 to the Pacific Ocean, returned on 6 July 1823, 1.443 barrels sperm oil.

Source

Catalogue of Nantucket Whalers and their voyages from 1815 to 1870. Hussey&Robinson, Nantucket, 1876.

American seal hunter William&Nancy departed to sea in 1820

Of Nantucket, master Tristam Folger, departed in 1820 to the Western Islands for seal skins, brig.

Source

Catalogue of Nantucket Whalers and their voyages from 1815 to 1870. Hussey&Robinson, Nantucket, 1876.

Dutch fishing vessel, Zeldenrust (OD6) 1987-



Vlissingen, Netherlands 3 February 2023

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Ouddorp, Netherlands, IMO 8619998, MMSI 245794000 and call sign PIXX. Built by Van Santen Constructie, Sliedrecht, Netherlands in 1987.

American whaler General Pike left Nelson, New Zealand according to the newspaper Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle dated 6 February 1847

An item reported the departure on 6 February of the American whaler General Pike 400 tons master Pearce to the whaling grounds.

American whaler Pocohontas underway to the whaling grounds according to the newspaper Auckland Times dated 20 September 1845

An item reported the departure on 16 September of the American whaler Pocohontas master Manter for the whaling grounds 450 barrels sperm oil 500 barrel black oil 5,000 lbs bone. 

American whaler Mount Vernon arrived at Wellington, New Zealand according to the newspaper Wellington Independent dated 26 November 1845

An item reported the arrival on 16 November of the American whaler Mount Vernon 384 tons master Coleman from the whaling grounds.

Australian whaling barque Carnarvon underway to whaling grounds according to the newspaper New Zealand Spectator and Cook’s Strait Guardian dated 5 July 1845

An item reported the departure [of Wellington?] on 1 July of the whaling barque Carnarvon 300 tons master Irving of Sydney, Australia to the whaling grounds. 

Sunday, 5 February 2023

Dutch general cargo ship (ex-Claudia 1999-2010) Lady Claudia 2010-



Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 28 January 2023

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Delfzijl, IMO 9201798, MMSI 45772000 and call sign PCHE. Owner until 2008 CV Claudia, since the C-Schepen BV., manager Wijnne&Barends, Delfzijl, Netherlands. Built by Royal Niestern Sander, Delfzijl, Netherlands in 1999. 

USA intending to built a nuclear tanker according to the Dutch newspaper Het Rotterdams Parool dated 10 January 1957

An item reported that the USA intended to built a nuclear tanker for which plans and drawings were already in an advanced stage. 

France intended to built nuclear propelled tanker according Provinciale Noord-Brabantsche courant Het huisgezin dated 26 September 1958

An item dated Paris, France 25 September reported that France expected to launch the first nuclear tanker in 1961, measuring 50,000-60,000 tons. That week started experiments with a scaled model of the hull fitted out with control and registration instruments. 

Italy studying nuclear propelled tanker and cargo submarine according to the Dutch newspaper Deventer dagblad dated 18 August 1958

An item reported that in Italy projects for building a 70,000 tons nuclear tanker and a nuclear cargo submarine were studied. 

German general cargo ship (ex-Sunergon 1984-1994, Rachel 1994-2003, Lisa D. 2003-2022) Petra L 2022-



Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 28 January 2023

Antigua&Barbuda-flagged, homeport St. John’s, IMO 8205187, MMSI 304559000 and call sign V2OK3. Owner and manager Mp Shipping GmbH&Co. KG, Hamburg, Germany. Built by Barkmeijer Stroobos, Stroobos, Netherlands in 1984. As Lisa D. owner Drabert Schiffahrt, Oldenburg, Germany and as Sunergon Bruins&Co. Ex-Sunergon rename May 1994, Rachel renamed August 2003 and Lisa D renamed May 2022.

Mitsubishi Heavy Industries designing nuclear propelled tanker and submarine tanker according to the Dutch newspaper Gereformeerd gezinsblad dated 28 August 1957

An item referred to a announcement in January that year that the Mitsubishi Heavy Industries started with designing 2 nuclear tankers, one a submarine tanker of 30,000 tons deadweight, the other a 47,000 tons deadweight tanker with 1-20,000 hp sodium graphite reactor.

Japanese Kawasaki Dockyard Company intended to built nuclear propelled tanker according to the Dutch newspaper Gereformeerd gezinsblad dated 28 August 1957

An item reported that the Kawasaki Dockyard Company Ltd., Kobe, Japan intended to built a 40,000 tons deadweight nuclear tanker with a horsepower of around 20,000 hp.

German shipyard designed nuclear propelled tanker according to the Dutch newspaper Tubantia dated 4 June 1958

An item reported that a shipyard at Hamburg, Germany completed the plans for building a 45,000 tons nuclear tanker, costs 70-80 million German mark. A group engineers investigated the possibilities of nuclear propulsion and during the building was American experience to be used.

Saturday, 4 February 2023

Russian cargo ship (ex-Lake Farber 1919-1929, Commercial Navigator 1929-1937) Chapaiev 1937-

Soviet Union-flagged, call sign UVBO. Completed by American Shipbuilding Co., Cleveland, Ohio, USA in August 1919. Gross tonnage 2,638 tons, under deck 2,278 tons, net tonnage 1,634 tons and as dimensions 251.0 x 43.6 x 26.2 feet.

Sources

Lloyds Register of Shipping 1939-1940.

The Belgian Shiplover No. 95, September-October 1963,. N.L. McKellar, Steel Shipbuilding under the U.S. Shipping Board, 1917-1921.

Fleetphoto.ru

ONI 208. Russian merchant ships in the Pacific. April 1945.

Register of Ships Owned by United States Shipping Board, August 1, 1920 (https://www.shipscribe.com/)

BGSU University Libraries. Historical Collections of the Great Lakes (https://greatlakes.bgsu.edu/

Japanese passenger cargo ship Asosan Maru 1934-1944

Call sign JWSI. Gross tonnage 8,812 tons, net tonnage 5,296 tons and as dimensions 453.0 (between perpendiculars)-475 (waterline) x 62.0 x 39.5 x 14 (light)-29 (loaded) feet. Laid down by Mitsui Bussan Kaisha Ltd., Tama, Japan on 29 January 1934, launched on 22 October 1934, completed on 20 December 1934, requisitioned by the Japanese Imperial Army on 9 October 1941 as the transport No. 854 and sunk by the American submarine USS Bluegill (SS-242) in the Celebes Sea on 2 May 1944. Diesel propulsion, horsepower 1,230 nhp/7,600 bhp, speed 16 (cruising)-18.5 (maximum) knots, 1 screw, fuel oil bunker capacity included deep tanks 2,793 tons and range 38,000 nautical miles/16 knots.

Dutch trawler (ex-Jan Senior 1992-2002) Joris Senior (ARM-18) 2002-

Vlissingen, Netherlands 3 February 2023

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Arnhem, IMO 9048677, MMSI 246057000 and call sign PFBR. Owned and managed by Meulmeester Visserijbedrijf, Arnemuiden, Netherlands. Ex-Jan Senior renamed 2002. Built by Padmos Scheepswerf, Stellendam, Netherlands in 1992.

Dutch Greenland whaler Rijsbos returned home according to the Dutch newspaper Oprechte Haerlemsche courant dated 26 August 1688

An item dated Amsterdam, Netherlands 25 August reported the arrival of the Dutch Greenland whaler Rijsbos zero catch results. 

Dutch Greenland whaler Brasem returned home according to the Dutch newspaper Oprechte Haerlemsche courant dated 26 August 1688

An item dated Amsterdam, Netherlands 25 August reported the arrival of the Dutch Greenland whaler Brasem 10 (?) whales 345 quardelen blubber and from she sailed to the river Maas. 

Dutch Greenland whaler Het Vlielant returned home according to the Dutch newspaper Oprechte Haerlemsche courant dated 26 August 1688

An item dated Amsterdam, Netherlands 25 August reported the arrival of the Dutch Greenland whaler Het Vlielant master Gerrit Pietersz Tortel 7 whales 308 quardelen blubber. 

Dutch Greenland whaler ‘t witte Paert returned home according to the Dutch newspaper Oprechte Haerlemsche courant dated 26 August 1687

An item dated Amsterdam, Netherlands 25 August reported the arrival 2 days earlier of the Dutch Greenland whaler ‘t witte Paert of Jisp 10 whales 510 barrels blubber. Had been solely active and had no information about other Dutch whalers and their carch results.

Dutch stern trawler Annalijdia (LT-43) 2019-

Inner harbour of Vlissingen, Netherlands 3 February 2023

United Kingdom-flagged,homeport Lowestoft, England, IMO 9828821, MMSI 232015678 and call sign MDDI7. Built by TB Shipyards, Harlingen, Netherlands in 2019. Design of Ove Kristensen of the Danish shipyard Vestvaerftet

Catch results of the German Greenland commandeur Cornelis Riwers according to the Dutch newspaper Amsterdamse courant dated 23 August 1710

An item dated Amsterdam, Netherlands 22 August reported the arrival on the Elbe, Germany of the German Greenland whaler Witte Zee commandeur Riewert Fredriksz bringing with a list with the catch results of the German Greenland commandeur Cornelis Riwers of Hamburg 2 whales. 

Catch results of the German Greenland whaler Adelaer according to the Dutch newspaper Amsterdamse courant dated 23 August 1710

An item dated Amsterdam, Netherlands 22 August reported the arrival on the Elbe, Germany of the German Greenland whaler Witte Zee commandeur Riewert Fredriksz bringing with a list with the catch results of the German Greenland whaler Adelaer of Hamburg 1 whale

Catch results of the German Greenland whaler Stads Welvaren according to the Dutch newspaper Amsterdamse courant dated 23 August 1710

An item dated Amsterdam, Netherlands 22 August reported the arrival on the Elbe, Germany of the German Greenland whaler Witte Zee commandeur Riewert Fredriksz bringing with a list with the catch results of the German Greenland whaler Stads Welvaren of Hamburg 1,5 whale

Catch results of the German Greenland whaler Tempel Salomons according to the Dutch newspaper Amsterdamse courant dated 23 August 1710

An item dated Amsterdam, Netherlands 22 August reported the arrival on the Elbe, Germany of the German Greenland whaler Witte Zee commandeur Riewert Fredriksz bringing with a list with the catch results of the German Greenland whaler Tempel Salomons of Hamburg 1 whale 

Dutch trawler (ex-North Sea 1987-1994, St. Mark 1994-2004) Miranda (P.224) 2004-

Vlissingen, Netherlands 3 February 2023

United Kingdom-flagged, homeport Portsmouth, IMO 8619948, MMSI 232006030 and call sign MHPS3. Owned and managed by Jaczon, The Hague, Netherlands. Built by Scheepswerf Maaskant, Stellendam, Netherlands in 1987. Ex-North Sea renamed January 1994 and St. Mark renamed January 2004.

American whaler Daniel Webster spoken according to the newspaper Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle dated 30 January 1847

An item reported that the American whaler General Pike left Twofold Bay on 27 September 1846 and spoke on 39 latitude 167 longitude the American whaler Daniel Webster of Nantucket 43 months out 1,500 barrels sperm oil.

American whaler Hope spoken according to the newspaper Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle dated 30 January 1847

An item reported that the American whaler General Pike left Twofold Bay on 27 September 1846 and spoke on 39 latitude 167 longitude the American whaler Hope of Provindence 15 months out 1,500 barrels black oil.

American whaler Brokley spoken according to the newspaper Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle dated 30 January 1847

An item reported that the American whaler General Pike left Twofold Bay on 27 September 1846 and spoke on 39 latitude 167 longitude the American whaler Brokley of New Bedford 36 months out 600 barrels sperm oil

American whaler London Packet spoken according to the newspaper Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle dated 30 January 1847

An item reported that the American whaler General Pike left Twofold Bay on 27 September 1846 and spoke on 39 latitude 167 longitude the American whaler London Packet of New Bedford 39 months out 2,200 barrels sperm oil 200 barrels black oil.

Thursday, 2 February 2023

Oil/chemical tanker STI Galata 2017-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 28 January 2023

Marshall Islands-flagged, homeport Majuro, IMO 9785689, MMSI 538007037 and call sign V7UW2. Registered owner STI Galata Shipping Co. Ltd. Other sources reporting owner Taiping and Sinopec TJ9 Shipping Leasing Co. Ltd., China and operator Zenith Gemi Isletmeciligi A.S., Istanbul, Turkey. Built by Hyundai Mipo Dockyard Co. Ltd., South Korea with hull number 2601 for Scorpio Tankers Inc., Monaco in 2017. 

Japanese potential troop transport Kibi Maru No. 15 in December 1921

On 22 May 1922 (!) received the Dutch naval staff at The Hague, Netherlands from the Dutch embassy at Tokyo, Japan a detailed specification of Japanese merchant ships of minimum 1.500 tons tonnage usable for troop transport over sea on 13 December 1921. If the transport was over a short distance for instance Japan-Philippines or Japan-Chinese harbour was the transport capacity increased with 10% and on a distance within 24 hours even doubled. The figures were supplied by non-Japanese experts, partly based on the troop transports between Japan-China and Japan-Siberia. The transports were kept secret. At that moment was Japan already considered as a potential enemy. For each ship was mentioned how many troops included equipment could be transported over a longer distance, for instance to an island belonging to the Dutch East Indies. In February-March 1942 invaded Japan indeed the Dutch East Indies.

Speed probably less then 10 miles, net tonnage 1,756 tons, gross tonnage 2,843 tons, transport capacity 950 men and owned by Toyosaki K.K. Coal-fuelled.

Source

Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 inventory number 137 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands).

Japanese potential troop transport Kaifuku Maru in December 1921

On 22 May 1922 (!) received the Dutch naval staff at The Hague, Netherlands from the Dutch embassy at Tokyo, Japan a detailed specification of Japanese merchant ships of minimum 1.500 tons tonnage usable for troop transport over sea on 13 December 1921. If the transport was over a short distance for instance Japan-Philippines or Japan-Chinese harbour was the transport capacity increased with 10% and on a distance within 24 hours even doubled. The figures were supplied by non-Japanese experts, partly based on the troop transports between Japan-China and Japan-Siberia. The transports were kept secret. At that moment was Japan already considered as a potential enemy. For each ship was mentioned how many troops included equipment could be transported over a longer distance, for instance to an island belonging to the Dutch East Indies. In February-March 1942 invaded Japan indeed the Dutch East Indies.

Speed probably less then 10 miles, net tonnage 1,989 tons, gross tonnage 3,181 tons, transport capacity 1,050 men and owned by Katusta K.K. Coal-fuelled.

Source

Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 inventory number 137 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands).

Danish chemical/oil products tanker Karine Theresa 2009-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 28 January 2023

Denmark-flagged, homeport Herning, IMO 9428451, MMSI 220648000 and call sign OUPL2. Owned by Herning Sg AS. Technical manager is/was TB Marine Shipmanagement (Riga), Riga, Latvia. Built by Nantong Mingde Heavy Industry Stock Co. Ltd., Nantong, China in 2009.

American whaler Warshanks spoken according to the newspaper Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle dated 30 January 1847

An item reported that the American whaler General Pike left Twofold Bay on 27 September 846 and spoke on 39 latitude 167 longitude the American whaler Warshanks of Falmouth 30 months out 1,100 barrels sperm oil 1,100 barrels black oil.

American whaler Lexington spoken according to the newspaper Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle dated 30 January 1847

An item reported that the American whaler General Pike left Twofold Bay on 27 September 846 and spoke on 39 latitude 167 longitude the American whaler Lexington 30 months out 1,200 barrels sperm oil 1,200 barrels black oil.