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Wednesday, 20 October 2021

Argentinean full rigged tall ship ARA Libertad 1953-




Harbour of Amsterdam, Netherlands 6 June 2009

Her building at the Rio Santiago Shipyard, Buenos Aires Province, Argentina was ordered on 12 November 1953 although already as far in 1946 plans were made to built her, laid down on 11 December, launched on 30 May 1956 and commissioned on 28 May 1963. Steel built with a displacement of 3.765 metric tonnes and as dimensions 91,7 (hull)-103,75 metres x 14,31 x 6,60 metres. She is also fitted out with 2 MAN 6-cylinders diesel engines providing 960 kW at 900rpm allowing a speed of 13,5 knots and with a speed of 8 knots she had a range of 12.000 nautical miles. Armed with 4-4,7cm quick firing (3pd) guns. Her crew consisted of 24 officers and 187 sailors excluded the 150 cadets.

The French navy in the South American area and in the Mediterranean according to the Nederlandsche Staatscourant dated 13 June 1838

According to tidings from Toulon dated until 5 June was it still quite busy in the harbour. A few smaller war vessels already left for Mexico to strengthen the French blockade squadron. They were to be followed by others which perhaps were also destined for service off the coast of the Argentinean Republic. Although there were none official French announcements via England was it confirmed that the French rear admiral Leblanc blockaded since end March the harbour of Buenos Aires and the mouth of the Plata river caused by difficulties with the Argentinean government. According to rumours at Toulon were also the ships of the line Montebello and Diademe to be fitted out and to join admiral Laland which was with the ship of the line Jena off Tunis. He was apparently ordered to prevent the Turkish fleet entering the narrow of Goletta and captured Tunis.

Argentinean government tug Gobernador Freyre arrived in Argentina according to the Dutch newspaper Schiedamsche Courant dated 16 December 1905

An item reported that the Argentinean government tug Gobernador Freyre built at the shipyard Gusto, (firm A.F. Smulders), Schiedam, Netherlands arrived at Santa Fé, Argentina. Everything was well on board. She sailed under captain C. Spaanderman towards her destination. (1)


Note
1. Yard number 303. Horsepower 250 hp.

Argentinean aspirant midshipmen first practically schooled before theoretical study begun according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1907-1908 dated no.5

An item referred to the Tribune reporting that Argentinean aspirant midshipmen were stationed for five years to become acquainted with all activities on board of a ship, before the 4 years theoretical study at the naval academy stated.

Brazil and Argentina ordered battleships by British shipyards according to the magazine Mitteilungen aus dem Gebiete des Seewesens dated 1907 No.7



Rivadavia-class


Minaes Geraes-class

An item reported that often was believed that the four 18.000 tons battleships ordered by British shipyards for Argentina (1) and Brazil (2) probably were not delivered but purchased by England. Despite this was a acceptable possibility it still was not actual.(1)

Note
1. The Rivadavia-class consisting of the Rivadavia (launched on 25 May 1910) and Moreno (launched on 9 July 1910) with a displacement of 27.900 (standard)-30.600 (full load) tons were however not built in England but by Fore River Shipbuilding Company, Quincy. Massachusetts respectively New York Shipbuilding, Camden, New Jersey, USA.
2. The Minaes Geraes-class consisting of the Minas Geraes (laid down by Armstrong Whitworth, United Kingdom on 17 April 1907) and the Sao Paulo (laid down by Vickers, Barrow-in-Furness, United Kingdom on 30 April 1907) with a displacement of 19.105 (standard)-21.370 (full load) tons. 

Argentinean merchant ships not using the convoy system according to the Dutch newspaper Rotterdamsch nieuwsblad dated 11 April 1942

An item referred to tidings from Buenos Aires that officially was announced that Argentinean merchant ships would participate in convoys.(1)

Note
1. Argentine declared not earlier war on Germany as on 27 March 1945.

Argentinean navy got budget for buying diving bell according to the Dutch newspaper Algemeen Handelsblad dated 8 July 1939

An item dated Buenos Aires 7 July reported that the parliament approved the budget of 2.200.000 pesos for buying a diving bell in the USA like the one used during the disaster with the Squalus.

An unknown Belgian steamship used by Paraguayan revolutionaries according to the Dutch newspaper Nieuwe Tilburgsche Courant daily edition dated 10 January 1912

This newspaper published a news item dated Bruxelles 9 January dealing with a Belgian steamship hired by the Paraguayan revolutionaries at Zeebrugge. A Belgian stayed on board when the ship saw action and was afterwards able to tell what happened. When the borders of Paraguay were passed were the guns hidden and came president Gora on board to lead the expedition. The Belgian crew was replaced by a Argentinean. The first day was Pilar captured after just one gunshot. The next two days were in the same manner another four villages captured. After a bombardment of 30 minutes surrendered Vileta near the capital city. New leaders of the revolutionaries came with 200 men on board and the next day was the capital city attacked. The Belgian sailor who told this story was at that moment send to the shore. According to the newspaper Gazette were on board 26 guns, 16 machine guns, 5.500 rifles, 5.500 uniforms and 250 barrels gunpowder. A complaint was to be expected.

German container ship (ex-Violetta 2007, MOL Drakensberg 2007, CMA CGM Providencia 2007-2008, Violettta 2008, Violetta 2008-2009, DAL Madagascar 2009-2011) Violetta 2011-


Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 13 June 2018

Marshall Islands-flagged, IMO 9344710, MMSI 538090271 and call sign V7LR4. Built at the JJ Sietas Schiffswerft, Hamburg, Germany in 2007. Owned and managed by Dohle Schiffahrt, Hamburg, Germany. Ex-Violetta renamed March 2007, MOL Drakensberg renamed December 2007, CMA CGM Providencia renamed 18 November 2008. Violettta renamed 18 November 2008, Violetta renamed 14 January 2009 and DAL Madagascar renamed 11 March 2011. Now Portugal-flagged, MMSI 255806258 and call sign CQAR8.

Movements of the Dutch E.I.C. ships in the Dutch East Indies in March 1694

The National Archive of Indonesia published on her website tables of contents of the so-called Daghregisters (Daily accounts) of the Castle Batavia, HR no.'s 2512-2513. Unfortunately they are in Dutch. In those tables you can find for instance information about the ships arriving at and departing from Batavia (nowadays Djakarta). I extracted the movements of the ships and vessels owned by the E.I.C. The dates mentioned below in the text are the register dates. See also on this weblog the notes dealing with cargo capacities and individual ships.

Belois, fluyt, destined via Siam towards Japan 26 March 1694
Bije, frigate, arrived at Batavia coming from Ceylon 13 March 1694, destined towards Mallabaar 19 March 1694
Blauwenberg, yacht, arrived at Batavia coming from the West Coast of Sumatra 14 March 1694
Boswijk, yacht, ordered to fit out for war purposes 2 March 1694
Bovencaspel, fluyt, arrived at Batavia coming from Bengal 29 March 1694
Bronste, small fluyt, departed Batavia towards Ambon 12 March 1694
Casteel Batavia, ship, ordered to fit out for war purposes 2 March 1694
Clipvis, pantjalang, departed Batavia towards the Sunda Strait for patrolling for the coming ships 18 March 1694
Coning William, ship, ordered to fit out for war purposes 2 March 1694
Couverden, ship, decided to sent her towards Japara with 50 soldiers destined for Japara and another 40 for Cheribon 7 March 1694, departed Batavia via Cheribon towards Japara 10 March 1694
Craanvogel, departed Batavia towards Banda to serve in that territory 20 March 1694
Crab, pantjalang, departed Batavia towards the Sunda Strait for patrolling for the coming ships 18 March 1694
Eemland, yacht, news of her coming back from Mauritius due to heavy leaking 3 March 1684, arrived at Batavia 4 March 1684, presumably fire on board 5 March 1694
Faam, news of her departure from Ceylon towards the Netherlands 13 March 1694
Fortuijn, small yacht, destined for the so-called Vries baaij at the South side of Java with provisions for the Zillida 9 March 1694, departed Batavia 10 March 1694
Lapland, chialoup, arrived at Batavia coming from Palembang 3 March 1694
Nierop, fluyt, within some days towards Japara 7 March 1694, departed Batavia towards Japara 17 March 1694
Stantvastigheijt, small yacht, arrived at Batavia coming from Bantam with a cargo of pepper 10 March 1694, destined towards Mauritius and Madagascar to replaced the returned Eemlant 19 March 1695
Visserij, ship, ordered to fit out for war purposes 2 March 1694
Vliegende Vis, pantjalang mentioned 23 March 1694
Voetboog, news of her departure from Ceylon towards the Netherlands 13 March 1694
Woggelum, ship, chamber Hoorn, arrived at Batavia coming from the Netherlands with almost 80 dead men on the voyage 6 March 1694
Zeehaas, pantjalang, departed Batavia towards Cheribon 30 March 1694
Zillida, yacht, news of her coming from Ceylon in the Sunda Strait and forced to anchor in the so-called Vries baaij at the South side of Java 8 March 1694, news to her that within 1 or 2 days the Fortuijn was sent with victuals 9 March 1694, her captain Adam Slegt arrived at Batavia coming via Cheribon 25 March 1694

The possibility of a French naval base on Madagascar according to the Dutch newspaper Schiedamsche Courant dated 16 August 1921

The correspondent of the newspaper The Times at Cape town, South Africa reported that the French cabinet considered the establishment of a naval base on the South East coast of Madagascar. The French sloop Bellatrix made a survey voyage along the coast between Manajary and Farafangana and it was expected that the base was located between these two points. The base was to be used by the fleet division which was again stationed in the Indian Ocean.

Swedish bark Priam underway from Madagascar towards Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 15 August 1893

An item dated 13th reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer [nowadays Anyer, Indonesia] by the Swedish bark Priam underway from Madagascar towards Anjer.

Movements of the Dutch E.I.C. ships in the Dutch East Indies in March 1683

The National Archive of Indonesia published on her website tables of contents of the so-called Daghregisters (Daily accounts) of the Castle Batavia; HR no. 2495. Unfortunately they are in Dutch. In those tables you can find for instance information about the ships arriving at and departing from Batavia (nowadays Djakarta). I extracted the movements of the ships and vessels owned by the E.I.C. The dates mentioned below in the text are the register dates. See also on this weblog the notes dealing with cargo capacities and individual ships.

Coevorden, ship, departed Batavia towards Bantam 9 March 1683
Craanvogel, hooker, arrived at Batavia coming from Toncquin 9 March 1683
Delfshaven, fluyt, arrived at Batavia coming from Rembang 19 March 1683
Eemlant, yacht, chamber Amsterdam, arrived at Batavia coming via Cape Madagascar, Couchin and the West Coast from the Netherlands with 52 men 23 March 1683
Geele Beer, fluyt, departed Batavia via Bouton towards Ternate 1 March 1683
Griffioen, chialoup, arrived at Batavia coming from Bantam 23 March 1683
Hellevoetsluijs, ship, returned off Canton from Macao 31 March 1683
Huijs te Bergen, ship, arrived at Batavia coming from Bengal 9 March 1683
Huijs te Cleef, yacht, arrived at Batavia coming from patrolling in Banca Strait 9 March 1683
Janskerck, fluyt, hull of the laid up ship sold for 280 rijksdaalders 27 March 1683
Marcken, small fluyt, arrived at Batavia coming from Cheribon 16 March 1683, departed Batavia towards Bantam 30 March 1683
Naaltwijck, small yacht, departed Batavia towards Bantam 2 March 1683, arrived at Batavia coming from Bantam 15 March 1683
Nederhorst, cat, departed Batavia via Soerabaja towards Banda 1 March 1683
Nieuw Middelburgh, ship, departed Batavia towards Bantam 9 March 1683, arrived at Batavia coming from Bantam 16 March 1683
Quartel, hooker, arrived at Batavia coming from Cheribon 17 March 1683
Roemerswael, ship, departed Batavia towards Bantam 9 March 1683
Rogh, small yacht, arrived at Batavia coming from Bantam 11 March 1683
Sillida, small yacht, arrived at Batavia coming via Bantam from Seringij 15 March 1683
Stadgrave, ship, arrived at Batavia coming from Bengal 9 March 1683
Tijger, frigate, destined with 4 pantjalangs towards Craoangh for patrolling 26 March 1683
Wapen van Tertholen, ship, departed Batavia towards Sunda Strait with fresh water for the homeward bound ships 21 March 1683
't Wout, ship, returned off Canton from Macao 31 March 1683
Zeijst, yacht, arrived at Batavia coming from Sunda Strait 1 March 1683, departed Batavia towards Sunda Strait 20 March 1683
Zirckzee, ship, arrived at Batavia coming from Bantam 15 March 1683

American cruiser USS Chicago underway towards South African and Brazil according to the Dutch newspaper De grondwet dated 4 July 1899


An item reported the departure on Monday of the American cruiser USS Chicago (1) from Tamatatee, Madagascar towards the Delagoa Bay, South Africa and via Cape of Good Hope bound for Brazil. She was however to stay nearby this cape as long as needed for protecting American interests in turbulent Transvaal (2) where Americans were working in the diamond fields of possessed gold mines.

Notes
1. Protected cruiser, ordered on 3 March 1883, building awarded on 26 July 1883, laid down by John Roach&Sons, Chester, Pennsylvania, USA on 29 December 1883, launched on 5 December 1885, commissioned on 17 April 1889, decommissioned on 30 September 1923, renamed Alton on 16 July 1928, sold on 15 May 1936 and foundered while under tow from Hawaii towards San Francisco on 8 July 1936.
2. Between 11 October 1899 and 31 Mau 1902 were the Boer States South African Republic or Republic of Transvaal and the Orange Free State at one side and the United Kingdom an the other side involved in the Second Boer War. 

French navy transport Golo visited the Dutch East Indies in 1936

An item reported that the French transport Golo (1) visited the Dutch East Indies harbour Tandjong Priok between 7-12 November 1936.(2)

Notes
1. Launched by Forges&Chantiers de la Gironde, Bordeux, France on 8 July 1933, scuttled at Toulon, France on 27 November 1942, salvaged on 17 September 1943 was she broken up.
2. The Dutch newpaper Het nieuws van den dag voor Nederlandsch-Indië dated 15 October 1936 reported a non-official visit on 7th November and to stay until the 12th. Displacement 3.690 tons, dimensions 90 x 13,5 x 4,5 metres and an armament of 2-7,5cm/2.9” and 2-3,7cm/1.46” guns. The Soerabaijasch handelsblad dated 5 November 1936 reported that the same day the French transport Golo was to arrived for a stay of some days at Tandjong Priok. The Bataviaasch nieuwsblad dated 6 November reported her arrival at 15:00 o’clock. The edition of the 7h reported that she was commanded by captain M.M. Martin, further more were 7 officers and 97 sailors on board. Homeport was Cherbourg. She looked like a heavy cargo ship although painted grey. She came from Saigon and was bound for Beirut, Lebanon. The Het nieuws van den dag voor Nederlandsch-Indië dated 10 November reported her departure at 13:00 o’clock towards Madagascar.

Source
Jaarboek van de Koninklijke Nederlandsche Zeemacht 1936-1937. 

Tuesday, 19 October 2021

Nordic sails - History & development of working sail in North & Northwest-Europe

The intention behind creation of this book was to present the reader with a broad outline of the history and development of working sail in Northern and North-western Europe. The vessels depicted represent hundreds of years of evolution in merchant and fishing ship design and construction. Although many tend to believe that the "age of sail" is long gone and destined never to return, it has in fact never faded completely away, merely decreased in presence and, remarkably enough, some of the technologies and inventions of the past are now revealing their potential to become more important in the future.


Throughout human history, ship propulsion has become more and more advanced. In the earliest days it was provided mostly by paddles/oars, followed by sails. Only after the Industrial Revolution did things start to change more and ship propulsion became increasingly diverse over the years that followed, first with the introduction of steam engines, followed by steam turbines, gasoline and diesel engines, electrical motors, nuclear power and even hydrogen-fueled systems, but the development of wind-based methods never stopped. Sailing merchant ships are making a quite unexpected comeback, and their numbers are increasing. These days the family of commercially active sailing ships is becoming more diverse once again, as the vessels carrying 'classic' canvas sails are being joined by ones carrying the so-called mechanical sails, such as rotor sails, dyna sails, wing sails, wind turbines and various other wind powered mechanisms.

The 1973 oil crisis gave birth to many initiatives towards sailing cargo ship revival, but few of them actually came to fruition. Some examples from this "forgotten decade" of ship design are included here, to an extent permitted by the size constraints of this publication and an unfortunate limitation stemming from a limited source base for these often extremely imaginative projects. Yet, many engineers dared to take the challenge of pushing the bounds of sail technology to wholly new levels and they will all be honoured in this publication as a result

The focus is on ships built (or intended to be built) in countries located in Northern & North-western Europe, as well as those vessels built elsewhere but for clients from the aforementioned areas. As mentioned, obvious practical considerations allowed us to present only a limited selection from an immense multitude of ships that potentially could be included, and some tough choices had to be made in order to find a proper balance between the various categories of vessels while keeping this publishing project manageable. The categories of all kinds of sailing merchant and fishing ships were eligible to be included in this book, on the condition that they were originally built for these purposes, even if not necessarily "sailing" ships from the start, merely converted from motor vessels at some point in their service lives:

Each ship has been presented in a number of detailed technical drawings depicting them during key moments of their history, and supported by detailed write-ups of the ship's service record, technical specifications and sail plans. Starting with their original appearance, followed by the modifications made, changes of ownership, changes in purpose and in some cases their change back to a nearly original state.

Countries that will be represented: Åland, Belgium, Denmark, Estonia, Faroe Islands, France , Germany, Ireland, Iceland, Latvia, Lithuania, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Russia/Soviet Union, Sweden, United Kingdom.

American large cruiser USS Puerto Rico (CB5) according to the report of progress of naval construction dated 1 May 1942

American Alaska-class large cruisers

American Baltimore-class heavy cruisers

German admiral Graf Spee pocket battleship of Deutschland-class heavy cruisers

Contractor New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Camden, USA.  

Percentage of completion on 1 May 1942: 1.8 

Percentage of completion gain for April 1942: 0.2 

Number of months between keel laying and completion 29-1/5 

Date of completion as per contract or order: 1 August 1946.  

Date of completion as reported by building yard on 11 January 1941: 1 September 1945. 

Date of completion as last reported by building yard: 15 October 1945.   

Months behind 11 January 1941 prediction: 1.5 

Building ordered on 9 September 1940 and cancelled in June 1943. The concept for a large cruiser dated back from the 1930 when Germany developed the so-called pocket battleships armed with 28cm/11” guns (later classified as heavy cruisers) which were to beat the Washington heacy cruiser armed with 20.3cm/8” guns. End 1930's seemed Japan intending to built the B-65 class which super cruisers armed with 31cm/12.2” were no match for the US heavy cruisers. The result was that the US navy started with designing her super cruiser variant ending in at least 9 preliminary designs, the finally choosing for an increased Baltimore-class heavy cruiser design. General technical specifications. Displacement 30.249 (standard)-34.803 (full load) tons and as dimensions 241.25 (waterline)-246.43 (over all) x 28.0x w 8.26 (mean)-9.68 (maximum) metres or 791.6-808.6 x 91.9 3.75 x 27.1-9.25 feet. The machinery consisted of 4-shaft General Electric double-reduction geared steam turbines and Babcock&Wilcox boilers supplying 150.00 ship allowing a speed of 31.4-33 knots and a range of 12.000 nautical miles/15 knots. Crew numbered 1.517-2.251 men. Armament consisted of x3-30.5cm/12” cal 50 Mark 8 guns, 6x2-12.7cm/5”cal 38 dual purpose guns, 14x4-4cm/1.57” Bofors guns and 34x1-2cm Oerlikon guns and 4 OS2U Kingfisher or SC Seahawk aircraft to be stored in an enclosed hangar amidships. The armour consisted of a main side belt 23cm/9” gradually thinning to 13cm/5” thicknes sloped at 10 degrees. Further more a 9.7cm/ 3.8-10.2cm/4” thick armour deck, a 3.6cm/1.4” thick weather main deck, a 1.59cm/1.4” thick splinter deck. The barbettes were protected by 28cm/11”- 33cm/13” thick armour. The conning tower by 27cm/10.6”and a 13cm/5” thick roof and finally the gun turrets by 33cm/12.8” (front)-13cm/5” (roof)-13cm/5.25”-15.2cn/6” (sides)-13.3cm/5’5” (rear) thick armour.

Sources

Franklin Roosevelt D. Roosevelt Presidential Library&Museum. Bureau of Ships: reports 1 May 1942 FDR’s President’s Secretary’s Files (psfc000095).  

http://warshipsresearch.blogspot.com/

Dutch screw steam hopper suction dredger Rotterdam 2


Dimensions 45.60 x 8.20 x 3.50 metres, horsepower 225 ihp.

Dutch self emptying hopper suction dredger Noordzee

Dimensions 56.60 x 9.40 x 4.20 metres and 500 ihp horsepower.

Dutch Greenland commandeur Abraham Meyts returned home according to the Dutch newspaper Oprechte Haerlemsche courant dated 3 October 1747

An item dated Amsterdam, Netherlands 2 October reported the arrival on 30 September at Texel, Netherlands of the Dutch Greenland commandeur Abraham Meyts 6 whales 200 quardelen.(1)

Note

1. Abraham Fredriksz Myts, Greenland commandeur between 1727-1758, in 1747 for Klaas Arentsz Bloem, Zaandam, Netherlands 6 whales 200 barrels blubber 325 quardelen oil. Alphabetische naam-lyst van alle de Groenlandsche en Straat-Davidsche Commandeurs die sedert het jaar 1700 op Groenland en sedert het jaar 1719 op de Straat Davis etc. Gerret van Sant. Published by Johannes Enschede, Amsterdam 1770, with hand written note until 1794.

Dutch Greenland commandeur Hendrik Potter returned home according to the Dutch newspaper Oprechte Haerlemsche courant dated 3 October 1747

An item dated Amsterdam, Netherlands 2 October reported the arrival on 30 September at Texel, Netherlands of the Dutch Greenland commandeur Hendrik Potter 4 whales 160 quardelen.(1)

Note

1. Greenland commandeur between 1736-1756 for Hendrik de Haan, Amsterdam, Netherlands 4 whales 140 barrels blubber 250 quardelen oil. Alphabetische naam-lyst van alle de Groenlandsche en Straat-Davidsche Commandeurs die sedert het jaar 1700 op Groenland en sedert het jaar 1719 op de Straat Davis etc. Gerret van Sant. Published by Johannes Enschede, Amsterdam 1770, with hand written note until 1794.

Dutch Greenland commandeur Adriaan Meyts returned home according to the Dutch newspaper Oprechte Haerlemsche courant dated 3 October 1747

An item dated Amsterdam, Netherlands 2 October reported the arrival on 30 September at Texel, Netherlands of the Dutch Greenland commandeur Adriaan Meyts 3,5 whale 140 quardelen.(1)

Note

1. Adriaan Myts, Greenland commandeur between 1736-1761, in 1747 for Arent Arenntsz Bloem, Zaandam, Netherlands 3,5 whale 120 barrels blubber 200 quardelen oil. Alphabetische naam-lyst van alle de Groenlandsche en Straat-Davidsche Commandeurs die sedert het jaar 1700 op Groenland en sedert het jaar 1719 op de Straat Davis etc. Gerret van Sant. Published by Johannes Enschede, Amsterdam 1770, with hand written note until 1794.

Dutch Greenland commandeur Pieter Schooneman returned home according to the Dutch newspaper Oprechte Haerlemsche courant dated 3 October 1747

An item dated Amsterdam, Netherlands 2 October reported the arrival on 1 October at Texel, Netherlands of the Dutch Greenland commandeur P. Schoneman 9 whales 250 quardelen.(1)

Note

1. Pieter Schooneman, Greenland commandeur between 1721-1758, in 1747 for Arent Bruuyn, Monnikendam, Netherlands 8,5 whale 250 barrels blubber 380 quardelen oil. Alphabetische naam-lyst van alle de Groenlandsche en Straat-Davidsche Commandeurs die sedert het jaar 1700 op Groenland en sedert het jaar 1719 op de Straat Davis etc. Gerret van Sant. Published by Johannes Enschede, Amsterdam 1770, with hand written note until 1794.

Dutch Greenland commandeur Adriaan Pietersz Backer returned home according to the Dutch newspaper Oprechte Haerlemsche courant dated 3 October 1747

An item dated Amsterdam, Netherlands 2 October reported the arrival on 1 October at Texel, Netherlands of the Dutch Greenland commandeur A.P. Bakker 9 whales 200 quardelen.(1)

Note

1. Adriaan Pietersz Backer, Greenland commandeur between 1723-1753, in 1747 for Barent Lubeley, Amsterdam, Netherlands 5 9/10 whal 200 barrels blubber 348 quardelen oil. Alphabetische naam-lyst van alle de Groenlandsche en Straat-Davidsche Commandeurs die sedert het jaar 1700 op Groenland en sedert het jaar 1719 op de Straat Davis etc. Gerret van Sant. Published by Johannes Enschede, Amsterdam 1770, with hand written note until 1794.

Hopper suction dredger Amsterdam

Dimensions 43.50 x 8.70 x 3.50 metres and 200 ihp horsepower.. 

Unknown 20th Century harbor harbour

American whaler Governor Clinton reported according to the newspaper The Inquirer and Mirror dated Saturday Wednesday 4 March 1835

An item referred to the Parker which reported [at Oahu?] on 15 March 1834 the whaler Governor Clinton master Ludlow of Sag Harbor 7 months out 140 barrels oil.

American whaler Levi Starbuck reported according to the newspaper The Inquirer and Mirror dated Saturday Wednesday 4 March 1835

An item referred to the Parker which reported [at Oahu?] on 14 March 1834 the whaler Levi Starbuck master Freeman of Nantucket 7,5 months out 230 barrels oil.

American whaler Franklin reported according to the newspaper The Inquirer and Mirror dated Saturday Wednesday 4 March 1835

An item referred to the Parker which reported [at Oahu?] on 12 March 1834 the whaler Franklin master Griffin of Sag Harbor 7 months out 220 barrels oil. 

American whaler William&Eliza reported according to the newspaper The Inquirer and Mirror dated Saturday 28 February 1835

An item referred to the whaler Bengal which spoke on 3 February 1835 the whaler Wm.&Eliza of New Bedford 900 barrels oil.

American whaler James Munroe reported according to the newspaper The Inquirer and Mirror dated Saturday 28 February 1835

An item referred to the whaler Bengal which heard on 14 January 1835 of the whaler James Munroe master Plaskett on about 20 latitude south 27 longitude west bound for the Indian Ocean no oil.

Ukrainian container ship (ex-Jebsen Southland 1984-1998, Karin S 1988-1989, Emcol Carrier 1989-1991, Atlanta 1991-1992, CCNI Valparaiso 1992-1995, Francoli 1995-1998, Isabela B 1998-1999, Mint Express 1999, Elsa Oldendorff 1999-2000, EWL Colombia 2000-2001, Adria Verde 2001-2005, LT Verde 2005-2006, Ital Verde 2006-2010) Alessandra I -no longer in service

Oristano, Sardinia 24 January 2017

Malta-flagged, homeport Valletta, IMO 8321644, MMSI 9HA2527. Owned and managed by Transyug Shipping, Nikolayev, Ukraine. Built by Nobiskrug Yard, Rendsburg, Germany in 1984. Ex-Jebsen Southland renamed 1988, Karin S renamed December 1989, Emcol Carrier renamed 1991, Atlanta renamed December 1992, CCNI Valparaiso renamed 1995, Francoli renamed June 1998, Isabela B renamed January 1999, Mint Express renamed June 1999, Elsa Oldendorff renamed March 2000, EWL Colombia renamed February 2001, Adria Verde renamed May 2005, LT Verde renamed June 2006 and Ital Verde renamed September 2010. 

Movements of the Greeks and Turkish navies in February-March 1822 according to the Dutch newspaper Goessche Courant dated 29 March 1822

London, 22 March. Tidings from Corfu dated 5 March stated the arrival of the Turkish fleet of 70 ships at Patras and the disembarking of 12.000 soldiers. The Greek fleet with almost the same strength was also appeared in these waters, preparing to attack the Turkish.

The Turkish and Egyptian navies according to the Dutch newspaper Vlissingse Courant dated 10 March 1840

From Frankfurt came 4 March the news that according to a letter dated 6 February sent from Alexandria that there were rumours that Mehemet decided out free will to return the Turkish fleet within some days.

The Greek and Turkish navies in the Levant according to the Nederlandsche Staatscourant dated 14 June 1821

Vienna, 1 June. The ships of Hydra captured a part of the Turkish squadron and blockaded the remaining part in a harbour near Corfu.

Maltese galley San Giovanni de Paula 1664

Owned by the Order of Knights of the Hospital of Saint John of Jerusalem. Mentioned (date commissioned?) 12 September 1664 with as commanding officer Francessco de Brouillar.

Source
Ubaldino Mori Ubaldini. La Marine del Sovrano Militare Ordino de San Giovannni di Gerusalemme di Radi e di Malta. Rome, 1971, p. 566-595. 

British car carrier CSCC Shanghai 2008-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 6 June 2016

Bahamas-flagged, homeport Nassau, IMO 9361823, MMSI 311003600 and call sign C6XA5. Built at the Uljanik Shipyard, Pula, Croatia in 2008. Owned by Ray Car Carriers, Douglas, Isle of Man, United Kingdom and managed by Stamco Shipmanagement, Athens, Greece.

Finnish oil products tanker Stena Poseidon 2007-2013 (Espada Desgagnes 2013-)

Schelde offVlissingen, Netherlands 20 October 2013

Finland-flagged, homeport Helsinki shipspotting, according to website company United Kingdom-flagged, IMO 9334698, MMSI 230988000 and call sign OJMN. Gross tonnage 42.810 (international) tons, net tonnage 21.990 tons, deadweight 60.400 (at design draught)-74.297 (summer)-74.999 (at scantling draught) tons and as dimensions 220,00 (between perpendiculars)-228,50 (over all) x 3224 (moulded) x 12,20 (design)-15,40 (scantling) x20,45 (moulded depth) metres. Built in 2007 at the Split Shipyard, Split, Croatia. Owned and managed by Neste Oil Shipping, Espoo, Finland. As Espada Desgagnes owned and managed by Northern Marine Management, Clydebank. 

Maltese galley San Luigi 1668

Owned by the Order of Knights of the Hospital of Saint John of Jerusalem. Mentioned (date commissioned?) 20 October 1668 with as commanding officer Simeone Rondinelli.

Source
Ubaldino Mori Ubaldini. La Marine del Sovrano Militare Ordino de San Giovannni di Gerusalemme di Radi e di Malta. Rome, 1971, p. 566-595. 

France and Spain decreasing their numbers of galleys in the Mediterranean according to the Dutch newspaper Oprechte Haerlemsche courant dated 26 February 1701

An item dated Paris, France 21st reported that last week the intendant of the galleys at Marseille, France was ordered to disarm 10 galleys. Spain decided to disarm 12 galleys. From now on France was to keep 30 galleys in the Mediterranean and Spain 20.

Venetian naval movements according to the Dutch newspaper Groninger Courant dated 15 July 1788

Venice, 20 June. The Republic was collecting a considerable naval force at sea. Except for the squadron commanded by admiral Emo all ready at sea and the 42-gun frigate, a 32-gun chebecq and the 16-gun bomb chaloupe departed with admiral Prinsi on 12 June departed on 13 June another 2 galleys each with 350 men and 2 galliots with 8 gun barks. Within short time will a chebecq with two galliots depart and coming month had 3 large frigates to be fitted out for sea duty. At this moment the Republic had 24 ships at sea including 19 ships of the line while the building of another 5 ships of the line was going on. It was not clear what the purpose of this force was, that other countries respected the neutrality of the Republic or that admiral Emo wanted to force an armistice with the Bey of Tunis as soon as he got the needed gun barks. The 8 new gun barks mentioned on 12 June were apparently of a new designed while according to the news item the experiments in the harbours had been quite successful.

British galley Speedwell 1560-1580

Captured from France in 1560, broken up in 1580, a large measurement and a crew numbering 330 men.

Russian galleys preparing for departure according to the Dutch newspaper Amsterdamse courant dated 8 August 1747

An item dated St. Petersburg, Russia 13th reported that the Russian galleys which would depart that year towards sea were lying on the Neva. Until now was just one regiment embarked although on short notice others were to follow. According to official sources were that night some galleys ordered to depart although the destination was unknown. Some claimed the Baltic, other towards the island Oesel.

Russian dry cargo ship Ivan Kotlyarevskiy 1970-1998


Russia-flagged, homeport Vladivostok, IMO 7007875 and call sign UTOL. Of the Far Eastern Shipping Co. Broken up in May 1998. Built by Uljanik Shipyard, Pula, Yugoslavia (Croatia)in 1970. Part of the Pula-class first series consisting of the Pula, Dmitry Gulia, Nazym Khikmet, Arkady Gajdar, Alexandr Grin, Musa Dzhalilj, Demian Bednyi, Alexandr Gertsen, Vissarion Belinsky, Nikolav Ogarev, Nikolay Gogolj, Nikolay Dobroljubov, Anton Chekhov, Novikov-Priboy and Aleksandr Serafimovich. The second series consisted of the Dubrovnik, Alexandr Blok, Sergey Yesenin, Vladimir Maykovskiy, Suleyman Stalskiy, Gavrill Derzhavin, Vladimir Korolenko, Ivan Kotlyarevskiy, Konstantin Paustovskiy and Gamzat Tsadasa.

General technical characteristics. Two-deck and two island, full-scantling and with a closed shelter deck. Deadweight cargo capacity 11.717 tons, deadweight 14.340 tons, gross tonnage 10.401 tons, net tonnage 5.213 tons and as dimensions 148,38 (between perpendiculars)-159,42 (over all) x 21,24 (moulded) x 12,65 (depth to main deck) x 26,30 (height of mast acorn above main deck) x 1,10 (fore light)/9,40 (fore loaded)-3,47 (mean light)-9,72 (mean loaded|)-5,85 (light aft)/10,08 (aft loaded) metres. Speed 18,00 (full load)-20,48 (in ballast). Total bale cargo capacity 20.369 cubic metres and grain cargo capacity 22.276 cubic metres. Original were the first ships of this class for handling cargo fitted out withe 12-5 tons derricks and 2-60 tons derricks, later ships just had one or none 60 ton derricks. 

Turkish squadron stronger then expected according to the Dutch newspaper Oprechte Haerlemsche courant dated 6 August 1722

An item dated Florence 14th July referred to tidings received from Livorno reporting that the Turkish squadron was far more powerful than first believed. It numbered 36 sultanes, 20-25 galleys, some galliots and other vessels with presumable Malta as destination.

German seal hunter Faam Galley in 1730

Homeport Hamburg. Director Pieter Cramer, Faam Galley, commandeur Cornelis Jacobsz, catch results 16 barrels.

Source
Dutch magazine Europische Mercurius of 1730 p. 212-213.

German seal hunter St. Pieter Galley in 1730

Homeport Hamburg. Director Jurgen Christiaan Wuurman, St. Pieter Galley, commandeur Gerrit Jaspersz, catch results 156 barrels.

Source
Dutch magazine Europische Mercurius of 1730 p. 212-213.

Monday, 18 October 2021

Russian ship of the line Lefort 1833-1857

 

The wreck lying on the sea bottom

Laid down in 1833, launched on 9 August 1835 and capsized and sunk underway from Reval [nowadays Tallinn, Estonia] towards Kronstadt in a storm taking with her 826 people. Her wreck was discovered on 4 May 2013. Tonnage 3.500 tons and as dimensions 58.3 x 15.6 x 6,6 metres or 191 x 51 x 22 feet. Her crew numbered 756 men including 13 officers. She was armed with 94 guns. 

A second video showing more of the wreck is published here



Irish general cargo ship (ex-Arklow Femme 2010) Arklow Fern 2010-



Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 30 September 2021

Ireland-flagged, homeport Arklow, IMO 9527661, MMSI 250002173 and call sign EIJWS. Owned by Banco Espanol de Credito SA?.Registered owner Arklow Shipping, Arklow, Ireland and managed by Arklow Shipping, Arklow, Ireland. Ex-Arklow Femme renamed September 2010. Built by Astilleros De Murueta S.A., Vizcaya, Spain in 2010.

American whaler China visited Monganui, New Zealand according to the New Zealand newspaper Daily Southern Cross dated 26 June 1857

An item reported the arrival at Monganui, New Zealand on 14 March of the American whaler China of 370 tons from New Bedford, USA master J.W. Thompson 5 months out 80 barrels sperm cleared for whaling on 23 March.(1)

Sources

1. Whalemen’s Shipping List dated 30 June 1857 shipping agents Wm. Phillips&Son, departed on 15 October 1856.

American whaler Maria Theresia visited Monganui, New Zealand according to the New Zealand newspaper Daily Southern Cross dated 26 June 1857

An item reported the arrival at Monganui, New Zealand on 3 March of the American whaler Maria Theresia of 330 tons from New Bedford, USA master W. Davis jun. 28,5 months out, 1.800 barrels whale cleared for whaling and homeward bound on 11 March.(1)

Sources

1. Whalemen’s Shipping List dated 30 June 1857 shipping agents T.&A.R. Nye, departed on 24 October 1854

American whaler Endeauvour visited Monganui, New Zealand according to the New Zealand newspaper Daily Southern Cross dated 26 June 1857

An item reported the arrival at Monganui, New Zealand on 2 March of the American whaler Endeauvour of 251 tons from New Bedford, USA master J. Horsley 28 months out 1.150 barrels whale 50 barrels sperm cleared for whaling on 7 March.(1)

Sources

1. Whalemen’s Shipping List dated 30 June 1857 bark, 252 tons, shipping agents Abraham Ashley 2nd, departed on 1 November 1854.

American whaler King Fisher visited Monganui, New Zealand according to the New Zealand newspaper Daily Southern Cross dated 26 June 1857

An item reported the arrival at Monganui, New Zealand on 17 February of the American whaler King Fisher of 450 tons from New Bedford, USA master M. Palmer out 5 months 85 barrels whale 700 lbs bone cleared for whaling on 25 February.(1)

Sources

1. Whalemen’s Shipping List dated 30 June 1857 called Kingfisher, bark, shipping agents Jonathan Bourne Jr., 451 tons, departed on 27 September 1856

American whaler W.C. Nye visited Monganui, New Zealand according to the New Zealand newspaper Daily Southern Cross dated 26 June 1857

An item reported the arrival at Monganui, New Zealand on 11 February of the American whaler W.C. Nye of 389 tons from New Bedford, USA master J.M. Soule 1.700 barrels whale oil 400 barrels sperm oil 10.000 lbs bone, cleared homeward bound on 26 February.(1)

Sources

Whalemen’s Shipping List dated 30 June 1857 the William C. Nye, shipping agents C.R. Tucker&Co., arrived at homeport on 13 June 1857.